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December, 1977 



North 
Carolina 
State 
University 






BULLETIN 




1978-* 



1978-80 Graduate Catalog 





VOLUME 77 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 
DECEMBER 1977 



NUMBER 4 



Published four times a year in February. June. August and December by North Carolina State University, Department of 
Admissions IV, h- Hall, P.O. Box 5126. Raleigh. N.C. 27607. Second class postage paid at Raleigh, N.C. 27611. 

Martha G. Daughtry. University Catalog Editor; Joseph S. Hancock, Assistant Director. Publications; Hardy D. Berry, 
tor, Information Services. 



' 




North Carolina State University 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



Graduate Catalog 

1978-80 



2 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

The University of North Carolina 

Sixteen Constituent Institutions 

WILLIAM CLYDE FRIDAY, B.S., LL.B., LL.D., D.C.L., President 

RAYMOND HOWARD DAWSON, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Vice President— Academic Affairs 

EDGAR WALTON JONES, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Vice President-Research and Public Seme, 

Programs 
L. FELIX JOYNER, A.B., Vice President-Finance 
JOHN L. SANDERS, A.B., J.D., Vice President-Planning 
CLEON FRANKLYN THOMPSON, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Vice President— Student Services and 

Special Programs 
GEORGE ELDRIDGE BAIR, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Director of Educational Television 
HUGH S. BUCHANAN JR., B.A., Associate Vice President— Finance 
CHARLES RAY COBLE JR., B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Vice President— Planning 
KENNIS R. GROGAN, B.S., M.B.A., Associate Vice President— Finance 
JAMES L. JENKINS JR., A.B., Assistant to the President 
JOHN P. KENNEDY JR., S.B., B.A., M.A., J.D., Secretary of the University 
ARNOLD KIMSEY KING, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Assistant to the President 
ROSCOE D. McMILLAN JR., B.S., Assistant to the President for Governmental Affairs 
RICHARD H. ROBINSON JR., A.B., LL.B., Assistant to the President 
ROBERT W. WILLIAMS, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Vice President-Academic Affairs 



The University of North Carolina was chartered in 1789 and opened its doors to students at 
its Chapel Hill campus in 1795. Throughout most of its history, it has been governed by a 
Board of Trustees chosen by the Legislature and presided over by the Governor. During the 
period 1917-1972, the Board consisted of one hundred elected members and a varying number 
of i x-nffn-ii) members. 

By act of the General Assembly of 1931, without change of name, it was merged with The 
North Carolina College for Women at Greensboro and The North Carolina State College of 
Agriculture and Engineering at Raleigh to form a multicampus institution designated The 
University of North Carolina. 

In 1963 the General Assembly changed the name of the campus at Chapel Hill to The Uni- 
versity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and that at Greensboro to The University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro and, in 1965, the name of the campus at Raleigh was changed to 
North Carolina State University at Raleigh. 

Charlotte College was added as The University of North Carolina at Charlotte in 1965, and, 
in 1969, Asheville-Biltmore College and Wilmington College became The University of North 
Carolina at Asheville and The University of North Carolina at Wilmington, respectively. 

A revision of the North Carolina State Constitution adopted in November 1970 included 
the following: "The General Assembly shall maintain a public system of higher education, 
comprising The University of North Carolina and such other institutions of higher education 
as the General Assembly may deem wise. The General Assembly shall provide for the selec- 
tion of trustees of The University of North Carolina. . . ." In slightly different language, this 
provision had been in the Constitution since 1868. 

On October 30, 1971, the General Assembly in special session merged, without changing 
their names, the remaining ten state-supported senior institutions into the University as 
follows: Appalachian State University, East Carolina University, Elizabeth City State Uni- 
versity, Payetteville State University, North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State Uni- 
versity, North Carolina Central University, North Carolina School of the Arts, Pembroke 
State University, Western Carolina University, and Winston-Salem State University. This 
merger, which resulted in a statewide multicampus university of sixteen constituent institu- 
tions, became effective on July 1, 1972. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 3 

The constitutionally authorized Board of Trustees was designated the Board of Governors, 
and the numher was reduced to thirty-two members elected by the General Assembly, with 
authority to choose their own chairman and other officers. The Board is "responsible for the 
general determination, control, supervision, management, and governance of all affairs of 
the constituent institutions." Each constituent institution, however, has its own board of 
trustees of thirteen members, eight of whom are appointed by the Board of Governors, four 
by the Governor, and one of whom, the elected president of the student body, serves ex of- 
ficio. The principal powers of each institutional board are exercised under a delegation from 
the Board of Governors. 

Each institution has its own faculty and student body, and each is headed by a chancellor 
as its chief administrative officer. Unified general policy and appropriate allocation of func- 
tion are effected by the Board of Governors and by the President with the assistance of other 
administrative officers of the University. The General Administration office is located in 
Chapel Hill. 

The chancellors of the constituent institutions are responsible to the President as the chief 
administrative and executive officer of The Universitv of North Carolina. 



CONTENTS 

Administration 5 

The Calendar 6 

North Carolina State University 13 

The Graduate School 15 

The D. H. Hill Library 15 

Institutes 16 

Special Laboratories and Facilities 18 

Special Programs 22 

General Information 24 

Application 24 

Admission 24 

Registration 27 

Tuition and Fees 29 

Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships 33 

Other Financial Aid 35 

Military Education and Training 36 

Health Services 37 

Housing 37 

Graduate Programs 39 

Master's Degrees 39 

Master of Science and Master of Arts 39 

Master's Degree in a Designated Field 43 

Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education Degrees 45 

Fields of Instruction 52 

Board of Trustees and Board of Governors 275 

Graduate Faculty 277 

Index 314 

Campus Map 316 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ADMINISTRATION 

Joab L. Thomas, Chancellor 

Nash N. Winstead, Provost and Vice Chancellor 

Vivian T. Stannett, Vice Provost and Dean of Graduate School 

Earl G. Droessler, Vice Provost and Dean for Research 

George L. Worsley, Vice Chancellor, Finance and Business 

William L. Turner, Vice Chancellor for Extension and Public Service 

Banks C. Talley, Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs 

Jackson A. Rigney, Dean for International Programs 

Deans of Schools 

James E. Legates, Agriculture and Life Sciences 

Claude E. McKinney, Design 

Carl J. Dolce, Education 

Ralph E. Fadum, Engineering 

Eric L. Ellwood, Forest Resources 

Robert 0. Tilman, Humanities and Social Sciences 

Arthur C. Menius, Physical and Mathematical Sciences 

David W. Chaney, Textiles 

Graduate School — Administrative Office 

V. T. Stannett, Dean 

R. J. Peeler, Associate Dean 

Patsy H. Lloyd, Administrative Officer 



Graduate School — Administrative Board 

Term Expires 
V. T. Stannett, Dean 

R. J. Peeler, Associate Dean 

P. Batchelor, Associate Professor of A rchitecture May, 1979 

R. E. Chandler, Professor of Mathematics March, 1979 

D. L. Dean, Professor of Civil Engineering and Head 

of the Department March, 1981 

T. S. Elleman, Professor of Nuclear Engineering and 

Head of the Department December, 1981 

D. A. Emery, Professor of Crop Science and Genetics November, 1981 

R. D. Gilbert, Professor of Textile Chemistry September, 1980 

W. A. Jackson, William Neal Reynolds Professor of 

Soil Science July, 1979 

M. S. Knowles, Professor of Adult and November, 1979 

Community College Education 
J. M. McClain, Associate Professor of Political Science February, 1980 

J. D. Memory, Professor of Physics and Associate Dean, 

School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences September, 1979 

L. C. Saylor, Professor of Genetics and Forestry 

and Associate Dean, School of Forest Resources July, 1979 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



THE CALENDAR* 



FALL SEMESTER, 1977 



August 25 
August 26 
August 29 
September 5 
September 12 


Thurs. 

Fri. 

Mon. 

Mon. 

Mon. 


September 26 


Mon. 


October 14 


Fri. 


October 19 
October 28 


Wed. 
Fri. 


November 11 


Fri. 



November 23 


Wed. 


November 28 


Mon. 


December 9 


Fri. 


December 12-21 


Mon. -Wed. 


SPRING SEMESTER, 1978 


January 9 


Mon. 


January 10 


Tues. 


January 11 


Wed. 


January 25 


Wed. 


February 8 


Wed. 


March 3 


Fri. 


March 13 


Mon. 


March 17 


Fri. 


March 21 


Mon. 



Registration day. 

Change day (late registration, drop/add). 
First day of classes. 
Holiday. 

Last day to add a course. Last day to withdraw 
or drop a course with refund. 
Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 
below without a grade. 

Mid-semester reports due. Fall vacation be- 
gins at 10 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8 a.m. 
Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 
level without a grade. 

Deadline for submission of theses to the Grad- 
uate School in final form as approved by ad- 
visory committees by candidates for master's 
and doctoral degrees in December, 1977. Last 
day for unconditional pass on final oral exam- 
inations by candidates for master's degrees not 
requiring theses. 

Thanksgiving vacation begins at 1 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8 a.m. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



Registration day. 

Change day (late registration, drop/add). 
First day of classes. 

Last day to add a course. Last day to withdraw 
or drop a course with a refund. 
Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 
below without a grade. 

Mid-semester reports due; spring vacation be- 
gins at 10 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8 a.m. 
Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 
level without a grade. 
Holiday. 



'I lates indicated arc subject to change. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



March 31 



Fri. 



April 28 
May 1-10 
May 13 


Fri. 

Mon.-Wed. 

Sat. 


SUMMER SESSIONS, 1978 


First Session 




May 23 
May 24 
May 29 


Tues. 
Wed. 
Mon. 



May 30 



Tues. 



June 2 



June 9 



Fri. 



Fri. 



June 27 


Tues. 


June 28 


Wed. 


Second Session 




July 5 


Wed. 


July 6 


Thurs 


July 11 


Tues. 



July 12 



Wed. 



July 17 
Julv 24 



Mon. 
Mon. 



Deadline for submission of theses to the Grad- 
uate School in final form as approved by ad- 
visory committees by candidates for masters 
and doctoral degrees in May, 1978. Last day 
for unconditional pass on final oral examina- 
tions by candidates for masters degrees not 
requiring theses. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 
Commencement. 



Registration day. 
First day of classes. 

Last day to register; last day to withdraw or 
drop a course with refund. 
Deadline for submission of theses to the Grad- 
uate School in final form as approved by ad- 
visory committees by candidates for master's 
and doctoral degrees in June, 1978. Last day 
for unconditional pass on final oral examina- 
tions by candidates for masters degrees not 
requiring theses. 

Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 
below without a grade. 

Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 
level without a grade. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



Registration day. 
First day of classes. 

Last day to register; last day to withdraw or 
drop a course with refund. 
Deadline for submission of theses to the Grad- 
uate School in final form as approved by ad- 
visory committees by candidates for master's 
and doctoral degrees in August, 1978. Last day 
for unconditional pass on final oral examina- 
tions by candidates for master's degrees not 
requiring theses. 

Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 
below without a grade. 

Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 
level without a grade. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



August 9 
August 10 


Wed. 
Thurs. 


FALL SEMESTER, 1971 


August 24 
August 25 
August 28 
September 4 
September 11 


Thurs. 

Fri. 

Mon. 

Mon. 

Mon. 


September 25 


Mon. 


October 13 


Fri. 


October 18 
October 27 


Wed. 
Fri. 


November 10 


Fri. 



November 22 Wed. 

November 27 Mon. 

December 8 Fri. 

December 11-20 Mon. -Wed. 



Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



Registration day. 

Change day (late registration, drop/add). 
First day of classes. 
Holiday. 

Last day to add a course. Last day to withdraw 
or drop a course with refund. 
Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 
below without a grade. 

Mid-semester reports due. Fall vacation be- 
gins at 10 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8 a.m. 
Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 
level without a grade. 

Deadline for submission of theses to the Grad- 
uate School in final form as approved by ad- 
visory committees by candidates for master's 
and doctoral degrees in December, 1978. Last 
day for unconditional pass on final oral exam- 
inations by candidates for master's degrees not 
requiring theses. 

Thanksgiving vacation begins at 1 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8 a.m. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



SPRING SEMESTER, 1979 


January 8 
January 9 
January 10 
January 24 


Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 
Wed. 


February 7 


Wed. 


March 2 


Fri. 


March 12 
March 16 


Mon. 
Fri. 



March 30 



Fri. 



Registration day. 

Change day (late registration, drop/add). 
First day of classes. 

Last day to add a course. Last day to withdraw 
or drop a course with refund. 
Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 
below without a grade. 

Mid-semester reports due; spring vacation be- 
gins at 10 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8 a.m. 
Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 
level without a grade. 

Deadline for submission of theses to the Grad- 
uate School in final form as approved by ad- 
visory committees by candidates for master's 
and doctoral degrees in May, 1979. Last day 
for unconditional pass on final oral examina- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 







tions by candidates for master's degrees not 






requiring theses. 


April 16 


Mon. 


Holiday. 


April 27 


Fri. 


Last day of classes. 


Apr. 30-May 9 


Mon.-Wed. 


Final examinations. 


May 12 


Sat. 


Commencement. 



SUMMER SESSIONS, 1979 

First Session 



May 22 
May 23 

May 28 

May 29 



Tues. 
Wed. 
Mon. 

Tues. 



June 1 



June 8 



Fri. 



Fri. 



June 26 


Tues. 


June 27 


Wed. 


Secoyid Session 




July 2 


Mon. 


July 3 


Tues. 


July 4 


Wed. 


July 9 


Mon. 



July 10 



Tues. 



July 13 


Fri. 


July 20 


Fri. 


August 7 
August 8 


Tues 
Wed. 



Registration day. 
First day of classes. 

Last day to register; last day to withdraw or 
drop a course with refund. 
Deadline for submission of theses to the Grad- 
uate School in final form as approved by ad- 
visory committees by candidates for master's 
and doctoral degrees in June, 1979. Last day 
for unconditional pass on final oral examina- 
tions by candidates for master's degrees not 
requiring theses. 

Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 
below without a grade. 

Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 
level without a grade. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



Registration day. 
First day of classes. 
Holiday. 

Last day to register; last day to withdraw or 
drop a course with refund. 
Deadline for submission of theses to the Grad- 
uate School in final form as approved by ad- 
visory committees by candidates for master's 
and doctoral degrees in August, 1979. Last day 
for unconditional pass on final oral examina- 
tions by candidates for master's degrees not 
requiring theses. 

Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 
below without a grade. 

Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 
level without a grade. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



10 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



FALL SEMESTER, 1979 



August 23 


Thurs 


August 24 


Fri. 


August 27 


Mon. 


September 3 


Mon. 


September 10 


Mon. 


September 24 


Mon. 


October 12 


Fri. 


October 17 


Wed. 


October 26 


Fri. 


November 9 


Fri. 



November 21 Wed. 

November 26 Mon. 

December 7 Fri. 

December 10-19 Mon. -Wed. 



Registration day. 

Change day (late registration, drop/add). 
First day of classes. 
Holiday. 

Last day to add a course. Last day to withdraw 
or drop a course with refund. 
Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 
below without a grade. 

Mid-semester reports due. Fall vacation be- 
gins at 10 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8 a.m. 
Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 
level without a grade. 

Deadline for submission of theses to the Grad- 
uate School in final form as approved by ad- 
visory committees by cajididates for master's 
and doctoral degrees in December, 1979. Last 
day for unconditional pass on final oral exam- 
inations by candidates for master s degrees not 
requiring theses. 

Thanksgiving vacation begins at 1 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8 a.m. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



SPRING SEMESTER, 1980 


January 7 
January 8 
January 9 
January 23 


Mon. 
Tues. 
Wed. 
Wed. 


February 6 


Wed. 


February 29 


Fri. 


March 10 
March 14 


Mon. 
Fri. 



March 28 



Fri. 



Registration day. 

Change day (late registration, drop/add). 
First day of classes. 

Last day to add a course. Last day to withdraw 
or drop a course with refund. 
Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 
below without a grade. 

Mid-semester reports due. Spring vacation 
begins at 10 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8 a.m. 
Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 
level without a grade. 

Deadline for submission of theses to the Grad- 
uate School in final form as approved by ad- 
visory committees by candidates for masters 
and doctoral degrees in May, 1980. Last day 
for unconditional pass on final oral examina- 
tions by candidates for masters degrees not 
requiring theses. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



11 



April 7 


Mon. 


Holiday. 


April 25 


Fri. 


Last day of classes. 


Apr. 28-May 7 


Mon. -Wed. 


Final examinations 


May 10 


Sat. 


Commencement. 



SUMMER SESSIONS, 1980 

First Session 



May 20 
May 21 
May 26 

May 27 



Tues. 
Wed. 
Mon. 

Tues. 



May 30 


Fri. 


June 6 


Fri. 


June 24 
June 25 


Tues 
Wed. 


Second Session 




June 30 
Julyl 
July 4 
July 7 


Mon. 
Tues 
Fri. 
Mon. 



July 8 



Tues. 



July 11 


Fri. 


July 18 


Fri. 


August 5 
August 6 


Tues 
Wed. 



Registration day. 
First day of classes. 

Last day to register; last day to withdraw or 
drop a course with refund. 
Deadline for submission of theses to the Grad- 
uate School in final form as approved by ad- 
visory committees by candidates for master's 
and doctoral degrees in June, 1980. Last day 
for unconditional pass on final oral examina- 
tions by candidates for master's degrees not 
requiring theses. 

Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 
below without a grade. 

Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 
level without a grade. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



Registration day. 
First day of classes. 
Holiday. 

Last day to register. Last day to withdraw or 
drop a course with refund. 
Deadline for submission of theses to the Grad- 
uate School in final form as approved by ad- 
visory committees by candidates for master's 
and doctoral degrees in August, 1980. Last day 
for unconditional pass on final oral examina- 
tions by candidates for master's degrees not 
requiring theses. 

Last day to drop a course at the 400 level or 
below without a grade. 

Last day to drop a course at the 500 or 600 
level without a grade. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



12 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 









'iVf " ,-w 



NORTH CAROLINA 
STATE UNIVERSITY 

North Carolina State University is a large and complex state university, one of 
the major state universities of the nation. 

It shares the distinctive character of Land-Grant state universities nationally — 
broad academic offerings, extensive public involvement, national and international 
activities, and large-scale extension and research programs. 

State was founded as a Land-Grant state university under terms of the famed 
federal Morrill Act of 1862 which provided for public land endowments to support a 
public institution in each state. 

The Land-Grant heritage of fulfilling three major functions— research, exten- 
sion and academic affairs — is reflected in the large dimensions of these functions 
at North Carolina State University. 

The rich and varied academic program of the University is comprised of some 90 
bachelors of arts and science programs, 71 master's degree fields and 45 doctoral 
degrees. The University offers about 2,300 courses. 

Its research activities span a broad spectrum of about 700 scientific, technologic 
and scholarly endeavors, with a budget of about $20 million annually. 

Extension programs of the University are similarly diverse and include urban af- 
fairs, marine sciences, environmental protection, engineering, industrial and tex- 
tiles extension, agricultural extension and many others. 

The annual University budget is about $100 million. The University has 4,100 
plus employees. There are 1,771 faculty and professional staff, 208 adjunct and 
federal agency faculty, including 1,176 graduate faculty. 

There are 120 campus buildings with an estimated value of about $150,000,000. 
The central campus is 596 acres, though the University has 88,000 acres including 



14 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



once research and endowment forest of 78,000 acres. Research farms; biology and 
ecology sites; genetics and horticulture, and floriculture nurseries; and Carter 
Stadium near the main campus comprise about 2,500 acres. 

North Carolina State University is one of the three Research Triangle Univer- 
sities along with Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill. In the 30-mile triangle formed by the three universities is the 5,000-acre 
Research Triangle Park; the Research Triangle Institute, a subsidiary of the three 
universities; and the Triangle Universities Computation Center, a central facility 
for the extensive computing centers of the institutions. 

The University's total enrollment is about 17,700. There are approximately 14,- 
100 undergraduates and 3,625 graduate students. All 50 states and some 75 foreign 
countries are represented at the University. 

North Carolina State University is organized in eight schools and the Graduate 
School. The eight schools are Agriculture and Life Sciences, Design, Education, 
Engineering, Forest Resources, Humanities and Social Sciences, Physical and 
Mathematical Sciences and Textiles. In addition, a complex of divisions and 
programs provide for a wide range of special programs in academic affairs, 
research and extension. 

State is a member of the National Association of State Universities and Land- 
Grant Colleges. It is also a member of the American Council on Education, the 
College Entrance Examination Board, the Council of Graduate Schools in the Un- 
ited States, the National Commission on Accrediting, and the Southern Association 
of Colleges and Schools. 

The University is accredited by national and regional accrediting agencies ap- 
plicable to the University and its numerous professional fields. 



Harrelson Hall, State's round classroom, stands in the University Plaza with 
Dahney Hall and Williams Hall. 




Ui 



I Hill 



i I I 



ins 



^ «*:♦ 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 15 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Graduate instruction was first offered at North Carolina State University in 
1893, and the first doctoral degree was conferred in 1929. In the ensuing years, the 
Graduate School has grown steadily and now provides instruction and facilities for 
advanced study and research in the fields of agriculture and life sciences, design, 
education, engineering, forest resources, humanities and social sciences, physical 
and mathematical sciences and textiles. In 1976-77, the University granted 102 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees, 23 Doctor of Education degrees and 587 master's 
degrees. 

The Graduate School is currently composed of more than 1,100 graduate faculty 
members within the eight academic schools. Educated at major universities 
throughout the world and established both in advanced teaching and research, 
these scholars guide the University's graduate student body of some 2,550 men and 
women from all areas of the United States and about 70 other countries. 

The faculty and students have available exceptional facilities, including 
libraries, laboratories, modern equipment and special research areas. Additionally, 
a cooperative agreement exists among the Graduate Schools of the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 
Duke University and North Carolina State University which increases the 
educational and research possibilities associated with each. 

The D. H. Hill Library 

Library facilities at North Carolina State University include the main D. H. Hill 
Library and special libraries for the Schools of Design, Textiles, and Forest 
Resources. The collections, totaling more than 800,000 bound volumes and over 1,- 
200,000 microforms, have been carefully assembled to serve the educational and 
research programs of the University. 

The D. H. Hill Library contains particularly strong research holdings in the 
biological and physical sciences, in all fields of engineering, agriculture and 
forestry. The 6,000 volume Friedrich F. Tippmann collection in entomology and 
related biological sciences is one of the outstanding collections in the country. The 
collection of books and journals in the humanities and social sciences is especially 
strong in English and American literature, sociology and economics. 

The library's comprehensive collection of scientific journals emphasizes the ma- 
jor teaching and research interests at State; approximately 7,000 journals are 
received regularly. A large collection of state and federal government publications 
further strenthens the library's research material. The D. H. Hill library is a 
depository for publications of the Energy Research and Development Administra- 
tion (formerly AEC) and the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Na- 
tions, and has been a depository for U. S. federal documents since 1923. 

The Textiles Library, located in Nelson Textile Building, contains holdings in the 
fields of textiles and textile chemistry. It is regarded as one of the best textile 
libraries in the country. The School of Design Library, in Brooks Hall, has a fine 
collection of books, journals and slides in the areas of architecture, landscape 



16 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

architecture and product design. The Forest Resources Library which contains a 
limited collection of specialized literature is located in Biltmore Hall. 

As a further aid to graduate and faculty research, the library participates in an 
interlibrary loan program with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 
Duke University, Research Triangle Institute, IBM, Chemstrand, the Division of 
Environmental Health Services and the N.C. State Library in downtown Raleigh. 
A bus, arriving at the University daily Monday through Friday, makes resources 
from these seven libraries available to State students and faculty. Among the 
materials available are approximately 14,000 scientific periodicals. 

The D. H. Hill Library building has been expanded and remodeled for additional 
library seating and open shelf collections. An 11-story addition provides bookstacks 
for a 1,000,000-volume book collection and greatly expanded research facilities, in- 
cluding carrels and study areas. 

Among the many services offered by the library are orientation tours for faculty 
and graduate students and also lectures on library use to all new students. Com- 
prehensive reference service is available almost all the hours the library is open. A 
variety of microtext readers and printers in the library and an extensive microfilm 
collection provide access to much important research material. A music listening 
room is equipped with listening machines for playing tape recordings. One of the 
most widely used services in the library is the photocopy service. Coin-operated 
machines plus three machines operated by staff provide a wide variety of 
photocopy service, including copy from microfilm. Machines may be used all hours 
the library is open. 

The Curriculum Materials Center, administered by the School of Education, is 
located in Poe Hall. The center maintains a representative collection of secondary 
and university level materials including films, filmstrips, slides, audio tapes and 
simulation games that can be used for teaching in a variety of fields. A special 
collection of materials for teaching reading is a recent acquisition. Audiovisual 
equipment is available for previewing materials in the center and may be borrowed 
for use in Poe Hall classrooms. The center acquires each textbook adopted by the 
State Board of Education for secondary level subjects as well as other textbooks 
and reference materials. 



Institutes 

RESEARCH TRIANGLE 

The unique "Research Triangle" in North Carolina has captured national and in- 
ternational attention in recent years. It is a complex of three major universities 
and a research park. The Triangle area has the highest total of Ph.D. scientists and 
engineers on a per capita basis in the nation. The universities have a subsidiary 
campus— the Research Triangle Institute — in the 5,500-acre park with $26 million 
annual research revenue. 

There are some 25 research organizations employing 12,000 people in the park. 
Some of the larger operations there include the permanent headquarters of the 
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences and the Environmental 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 17 

Protection Agency. The Triangle Universities— Duke University, North Carolina 
State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill— have es- 
tablished a center for advanced studies there and the new National Center for the 
Humanities has located there. Faculty and graduate students from the universities 
work closely with research park activities and scientists there frequently hold ad- 
junct appointments with the Triangle Universities. 

INSTITUTE OF STATISTICS 

The Institute of Statistics is composed of two sections, one at Raleigh and the 
other at Chapel Hill. At North Carolina State University, the Institute provides 
statistical consulting services to all branches of the institution, sponsors research 
in statistical theory and methodology, and coordinates the teaching of statistics at 
the undergraduate and graduate levels. The instructional and other academic func- 
tions are performed by the Department of Statistics, which forms a part of the 
Institute. 

WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 

The Water Resources Research Institute is a unit of the University of North 
Carolina System and is located on the campus of North Carolina State University. 
The deans of the School of Engineering and School of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences, the Dean for Research at North Carolina State University and two 
faculty members from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill serve as a 
board of directors. The Institute was established to promote a multidisciplinary at- 
tack on water problems, to develop and support research in response to the needs of 
North Carolina, to encourage strengthened educational programs in water 
resources, to coordinate research and educational programs dealing with water 
resources, and to provide a link between the state and federal water resources 
agencies and related interests in the University. 

Research and educational activities are conducted through established depart- 
ments and schools of the University System. All senior colleges and universities of 
North Carolina are eligible to participate in the Institute's research program. Basic 
support for the Institute's program is provided by the Office of Water Research and 
Technology, U.S. Department of the Interior, under the Water Resources Research 
Act of 1964, as amended, and appropriations from the State of North Carolina. 

The Institute has sponsored a graduate minor in water resources which offers a 
strong water resources program with the major in any of the basic disciplines con- 
tributing to water resources planning, conservation, development and manage- 
ment. This capitalizes on the combined training resources of the Raleigh and 
Chapel Hill campuses of the University System and offers these in an organized 
way to graduate students seeking interdisciplinary training in this field. Ad- 
ditional information concerning the program is presented elsewhere in this catalog. 

The Institute sponsors research and educational symposia and seminars, en- 
courages the development of specialized training opportunities, and provides a 
means for the continuing evaluation and strengthening of the University System's 
total water resources program. 



18 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Special Laboratories and Facilities 

BIOLOGY FIELD LABORATORY 

The Biology Field Laboratory is located eight miles from the University campus 
and comprises a 20-acre pond, 180 acres of extremely varied vegetation types and a 
modern laboratory building. The latter contains two laboratories, one for class use 
and another principally for research, and quarters for a married graduate student 
who serves as custodian of the property. 

The many unique ecological situations found in this area make it ideal for use by 
advanced classes of most biological science departments. Likewise, the area is well 
adapted to a variety of research projects by faculty, graduate students and un- 
dergraduates because of its habitat diversity. The close proximity of the laboratory 
facility to the campus makes possible many types of behavioral, physiological, 
ecological, taxonomic and limnological studies that could be accomplished only 
with great difficulty at other locations. 

COMPUTING FACILITIES 

The primary computing facility for the University is located at the Triangle Uni- 
versities Computation Center (TUCC) in the Research Triangle Park about 15 miles 
from the campus. This center is jointly owned by North Carolina State University, 
Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. TUCC is 
equipped with two IBM System 370 Model 165 computers with a large variety of 
peripheral equipment and seven million bytes of memory. Data is transmitted to 
and from TUCC via the telephone system from many input/output facilities on the 
campus. 

The main campus facility is an IBM System 370 Model 135 computer with 512 
thousand bytes of storage located in Nelson Textile Building. This machine 
provides both high-speed communications with TUCC and local processing of all 
administrative work. Medium-speed terminals are located in the Schools of 
Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Engineering, and Agriculture and Life 
Sciences, and low-speed terminals are located throughout campus. 

A number of special purpose computing facilities also exist. The University 
Systems Analysis and Control Center provides centralized monitoring of 
laboratory equipment on a time-sharing basis, sharing data acquisition resources, 
and providing computer-based analog and digital data acquisition and analyses for 
laboratory sites. Installed equipment includes an IBM 1130, an IBM System 7, a 
PDP-11/40, and a microprocessor facility. Other facilities in the Schools of Educa- 
tion, Engineering, Physical and Mathematical Sciences and Agriculture and Life 
Sciences provide specialized educational and research computing. 

These extensive computing facilities provide graduate students with computing 
equipment to enhance their education and meet a variety of research requirements. 
Consequently, the University makes this range of computing facilities available for 
all disciplines and specialties. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 19 

ELECTRON MICROSCOPE CENTER 

The facilities of the Electron Microscope Center are available to all graduate stu- 
dents and faculty within the University for research purposes and to those stu- 
dents who wish only to obtain a general knowledge of electron microscope techni- 
ques. A charge is assessed when the Center is used for research by faculty and 
graduate students. 

The Center is located in Gardner Hall in a suite of rooms designed specifically for 
electron microscopy. Facilities of the Center include an ETEC U-l scanning elec- 
tron microscope, two transmission electron microscopes, a Siemens Elmskop 1A 
and a Hitachi HS-8-B, a specimen preparatory laboratory and a completely equip- 
ped darkroom. 

Formal instruction is provided in electron microscopic cytological techniques, 
use of transmission and scanning electron microscopes, photographic techniques 
and interpretation of electron micrographs. Instructional tours are available for 
secondary education groups. 

HIGHLANDS BIOLOGICAL STATION 

North Carolina State University is an institutional member of the Highlands 
Biological Station, Inc., an inland biological field station located at Highlands, 
North Carolina. The town of Highlands is in the heart of the Southern Ap- 
palachians at an elevation of 3,823 feet. The area has an extremely diverse biota 
and the highest rainfall in the eastern United States. 

Facilities are available throughout the year for pre- and post-doctoral research in 
botany, zoology, soils and geology. The laboratory building with research rooms 
and cubicles and the library are well equipped for field-oriented research. Also, 
four cottages and a dining hall are located on the edge of a six-acre lake. In addition 
to 16 acres surrounding the lake, the station owns several tracts of undisturbed 
forested land available for research. Research grants available through the station 
provide stipends for room, board and research expenses. 

LEARNING ASSISTANCE CENTER 

The Learning Assistance Center is an integral part of the research, development 
and service program of the School of Education which sponsors the Center jointly 
with the Division of Student Affairs. 

The Center provides tutorial assistance in coordination with various academic 
departments placing particular, although not exclusive, emphasis on basic 
freshman level courses in English and mathematics. Equipped with a variety of in- 
struments to facilitate or train eye movement for reading skill development, the 
Learning Assistance Center is concerned with remediation of reading problems 
relating to both rate and comprehension, and also assistance in improving study 
techniques and habits. The Center is a primary contact point for students needing 
special assistance due to visual, hearing or motor handicaps. 

Among the objectives of the Center is the development and implementation of 
experimental and demonstration projects which give promise of materially improv- 
ing learning programs. 



20 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CENTER FOR MARINE AND COASTAL STUDIES 

The Center for Marine and Coastal Studies was created to serve as the focal point 
on the N. C. State campus for marine and coastal related activities. The graduate 
program in marine sciences is administered by the Center for Marine and Coastal 
Studies. The goal of the program is to educate graduate students in specialized 
fields of the marine sciences rather than seek a single unified educational program 
that would be suitable for every student regardless of background or interest. It 
functions on an interdisciplinary basis with the botany, civil engineering, food 
science, geosciences, materials engineering, mechanical and aerospace engineering, 
and zoology departments contributing teaching and research support. Areas of 
specialization presently offered are: biological oceanography, geological 
oceanography, meteorological oceanography, ocean engineering, physical 
oceanography and seafood processing. 

The graduate program offers the Master of Science, Master of Marine Sciences 
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Graduate students may also take a minor in 
marine sciences. 

The Center is also active in developing a research effort in marine and coastal 
related activities. Research is performed by a number of research faculty as well as 
members of the marine sciences faculty. Research funding has been provided by 
the Coastal Research Program, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 
Sea Grant Office, N. C. Board of Science and Technology, Water Resources 
Research Institute, Department of Natural and Economic Resources and others. 

NUCLEAR SERVICE FACILITIES 

Specialized nuclear service facilities are available to the University faculty, stu- 
dents, and industry. The purpose of these facilities is to further the use of nuclear 
energy in engineering research and in scientific and public service programs. The 
facilities include: a 1 megawatt steady-state and pulse, pool-type, research reactor 
(PULSTAR), with a variety of test facilities; a 15,000 curie multi-purpose cobalt-60 
gamma irradiation source which includes a controlled environment support unit; 
intermediate level hot laboratories with hoods, junior caves and glove boxes; a 
neutron activation analysis and radioisotope laboratory; Nal and solid-state detec- 
tors; and counting and photographic rooms. The 50,000 sq. ft. Burlington Engineer- 
ing Laboratories complex houses the Department of Nuclear Engineering and the 
Engineering Research Services Division with their associated offices and 
laboratories. All of the facilities including the reactor are on the North Carolina 
State University campus. 

CENTER FOR OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION 

Established as a vocational education research and development center in 1965 
under the provisions of the Vocational Education Act of 1963, the Center for Oc- 
cupational Education is a unit within the School of Education. The Center was 
founded because occupational education problems are so varied that no single field 
of research or single disciplinary orientation is capable of providing all the 
answers. Studies and conferences in occupational education planning, work 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 21 

analysis, evaluation, labor and economics, adult education, personnel and 
leadership development, and education in rural areas have been included in the 
Center's program. 

The major research and development programs of the Center are focused on the 
relationship of occupational education to its context or environment, including its 
relationship to regional economy, political influence, the power structure, and the 
employment or work environment. Currently, the Center's programmatic thrust is 
in the systematic application of information technology to the identification, collec- 
tion, and provision of management information for occupational education 
decision-makers. 

The Center's programs are financed largely by grants and contracts from federal 
and state agencies. A limited number of graduate research assistantships are 
available. 

PESTICIDE RESIDUE RESEARCH LABORATORY 

The Pesticide Residue Research Laboratory is a facility in the School of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences devoted to research on pesticide residues in animals, 
plants, soils, water and other entities of man's environment. Although the 
laboratory is administered through the Department of Entomology, it serves the 
total needs of the School in cooperative research projects requiring assistance on 
pesticide residue analyses. 

The laboratory functions as a focal point for residue research involving inter- 
departmental cooperation, but faculty in the laboratory also conduct independent 
pesticide research on persistence and decomposition in soils and plants, absorption 
and translocation in plants, distribution in environment, and contamination of 
streams, estuaries and ground water. 

The laboratory is equipped with the latest analytical instruments. Graduate 
study can be undertaken in any aspect of pesticide residues either in the Pesticide 
Residue Research Laboratory or in one of the cooperating departments. 

REPRODUCTIVE PHYSIOLOGY RESEARCH LABORATORY 

The Reproductive Physiology Research Laboratory administered through the 
Department of Animal Science includes four environmental control rooms 
designed to provide constant levels of air temperature, humidity and light for 
animals involved in studies on reproduction. Facilities and equipment are available 
for surgery, in vitro growth of embryos, isotope labeling in embryo metabolism and 
transfer of embryos between females. 

Support for research at both the master's and the doctoral levels is available. 
Students may elect a comparative approach to a specific problem in mammalian 
reproduction, working with several species, or they may choose to work with a 
single species. Generally students select a problem associated with the identifica- 
tion of factors influencing early prenatal development, the endocrine control of 
ovarian function or some aspect of elucidation and control of aberrations in mam- 
malian reproduction. 

Cooperative research is possible between the laboratory and the Medical School 
or the Environmental Health Sciences Center at the University of North Carolina 



22 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

at Chapel Hill for those students desiring a broader training in the general area of 
reproductive physiology. 

Students whose work is concentrated in reproductive physiology can major in 
either animal science or physiology with a minor in related disciplines. 

SOUTHEASTERN PLANT ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORIES — 
PHYTOTRONS 

The Southeastern Plant Environment Laboratories operate as a cooperative 
association between North Carolina State University and Duke University with 
one unit, commonly called a phytotron, located on each campus. The laboratory is 
especially designed for research dealing with the response of biological organisms 
to their environment, and the high degree of control makes it possible to duplicate 
any climate from tropical rain forest to arid desert or arctic cold. 

Research in the North Carolina State unit concentrates on agricultural problems 
encountered in the southeastern United States. However, the ability to control all 
phases of the environment allows inclusion of research dealing with space, pollu- 
tion and tropical agriculture as well as basic physiological and biochemical in- 
vestigations. 

The facilities are available to the resident research staff, participants in North 
Carolina State's graduate research program and to domestic and foreign visiting 
scientists. 

TRIANGLE UNIVERSITIES NUCLEAR LABORATORY 

TUNL is a laboratory for research in nuclear structure. It is located on the 
campus of Duke University in Durham and is staffed by faculty members and 
graduate students in the Departments of Physics of Duke University, the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University. The 
principal tools of the laboratory are particle accelerators used to bombard target 
nuclei with an assortment of ions of accurately controlled energy and small energy 
spread. For example, protons can be accelerated to desired energies to within a few 
thousand electron volts and a bit over 30 million electron volts energy. The ac- 
celerators are a 3 MeV and a 4 MeV Van de Graaff generator, and a 15 MeV tandem 
Van de Graaff generator into which ions are injected by a 15 MeV AVG cyclotron 
normally accelerating negative ions. An on-line computer is used for data collection 
and analysis. 

Personnel from NCSU are participating partners in the maintenance and use of 
the laboratory. Collaboration with personnel from the other two participating uni- 
versities is encouraged. 

This laboratory, which began operation in 1968, is the first to combine a 
cyciotron and tandem Van de Graaff generator — the "Cyclo-Graaff." 

Special Programs 

RESEARCH PROGRAM AT THE OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED 
UNIVERSITIES 

North Carolina State University is one of the sponsoring institutions of the Oak 
Ridge Associated Universities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Through this cooperative 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 23 

association, North Carolina State's graduate research program has at its disposal 
the facilities and research staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Extensive 
research programs are underway there on physical and biological effects of radia- 
tion, radioisotope utilization and many other areas of nuclear science and engineer- 
ing. When master's and doctoral candidates have completed their resident work, it 
may be possible, by special arrangement, for them to do their thesis research at 
Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In addition, it is possible for the staff members of 
this University to go to Oak Ridge for advanced study in their particular fields. 

THE TRIANGLE UNIVERSITIES CONSORTIUM ON AIR POLLUTION 

Controlling the quality of the air we breathe is clearly recognized as one of the 
major problems facing man in the decades ahead. This concern has been expressed 
as a statement of national policy. 

The Triangle Universities (North Carolina State University at Raleigh, Univer- 
sity of North Carolina at Gnapel Hill and Duke University at Durham) took a ma- 
jor step in 1970 to make North Carolina an international center for research and 
training in air pollution control with the creation of the Triangle Universities Con- 
sortium on Air Pollution (TUCAP). Adding focus to their efforts was the proximity 
of branches of the two national agencies most immediately concerned — the En- 
vironmental Protection Agency and the National Institute of Environmental 
Health Sciences — in the Research Triangle area. 

At its founding the Consortium was the first of its kind in the country. It has 
brought together institutions with long experience in working together on common 
problems and interests. A pool of talent and resources that could cover all facets of 
the national problem, from biology to ecology, from law to medicine, from 
engineering to economics, has been brought together to provide the research and 
training needed by both the state and the nation. 

Nondiscrimination Statement 

North Carolina State University is dedicated to equality of opportunity within 
its community. Accordingly, North Carolina State University does not practice or 
condone discrimination, in any form, against students, employees, or applicants on 
the grounds of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, or handicap. North 
Carolina State University commits itself to positive action to secure equal oppor- 
tunity regardless of those characteristics. 

North Carolina State University supports the protection available to members of 
its community under all applicable Federal laws, including Titles VI and VII of the 
Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Sections 
799A and 845 of the Public Health Service Act, the Equal Pay and Age Discrimina- 
tion Acts, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Executive Order 11246. For informa- 
tion concerning these provisions, contact: 

Dr. Lawrence M. Clark 

Assistant Provost & Affirmative Officer 

201 Holladay Hall 

North Carolina State University 

Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 

Phone: 919/737-3148. 



24 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

GENERAL INFORMATION* 

Application 

Application for admission must be accompanied by the following: two (2) official 
transcripts from all colleges and universities previously attended, references from 
at least three people who know of the student's academic record and potential for 
graduate study, a non-refundable application fee of $10, and, in some cases, an of- 
ficial statement of the student's Graduate Record Examination scores.* Applica- 
tion and reference forms may be obtained by writing or visiting the Dean of the 
Graduate School, 104 Peele Hall, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N.C. 
27607. When completed, all application materials should be returned to the same 
address and must be on file in the Graduate School office at least 30 days prior to 
the date of intended enrollment unless an earlier date is specified by the major 
department. 

Foreign Students 

Students whose native language is other than English must submit TOEFL (Test 
of English as a Foreign Language) or U.S. Embassy test scores as evidence of 
ability to use English at a level of competence sufficient for graduate work. A 
minimum TOEFL score of 450 or a U. S. Embassy test score of at least 80 is re- 
quired prior to consideration for admission. The test date must be within 12 
months of the date of application. All foreign students must be cleared by the 
Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures during the first two weeks of 
their initial semester in residence and may be required to take additional course 
work in English. In addition, the foreign applicant must provide the University 
with verification that the required funds are available to support the proposed 
program of advanced study. Foreign nationals in the United States at the time ap- 
plication is made must provide information regarding their current visa status. 
The University provides special forms to be used by the applicant in supplying this 
information. 

Admission 

The procedures followed in evaluating an applicant's potential for success in 
graduate work and the criteria used for admissions decisions vary according to 
departments and schools and reflect an evaluation of the applicant's potential to 
engage in graduate work and the capability of the individual departments to ac- 
commodate additional students. Most departments consider applications as they 



•The following departments or school will not act on applications unless accompanied by GRE scores: biomathematics. 
education ( all programs with the exception of the master's program in adult and community college education; psychology 
also requires the Advanced Test and Miller Analogies), English, entomology, history, mathematics, plant pathology, 
political science, sociology, and zoology. 

Many departments, although not normally requiring GRE scores, may in special instances require their submission as ad- 
ditional information to be used in making a judgment of the student's potential for success in a graduate program. 

Information regarding the Graduate Record Examination and registration forms may be obtained from the Educational 
Testing Service, Box 955, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 or Box 1502, Berkeley, California 94701. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 25 

arrive, while others accumulate applications and make recommendations on ad- 
mission at certain times during the year. Generally, requests for admission are 
considered by departmental admissions committees which forward the departmen- 
tal recommendations to the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Students are admitted to full or provisional status in a specific degree program. 
Once the requirements for that degree program have been completed, no further 
registration as a graduate student will be permitted unless admission to a new 
graduate classification has been formally approved. Students with special objec- 
tives may request admission as "Graduate-Unclassified Students" (see below) or 
register in the "Post-Baccalaureate Studies" (see page 26) program through the 
Division of Continuing Education. 

FULL GRADUATE STANDING 

To be considered for admission in full graduate standing, an applicant must have 
a baccalaureate degree from a college or university recognized as standard by a 
regional or general accrediting agency and must have at least a "B" average in the 
undergraduate major. 

PROVISIONAL ADMISSION 

1. Provisional admission may be granted to applicants with bachelor's degrees 
from accredited institutions who lack undergraduate work considered essential for 
graduate study in a major field. Course work, without graduate credit, will be re- 
quired to make up such deficiencies before admission to full status can be granted. 

2. Applicants with bachelor's degrees from nonaccredited institutions may be 
granted provisional admission when their academic records warrant this status. 
Additional course work will be required of such students when deficiencies in 
previous training are apparent. 

3. Students with bachelor's degrees from accredited institutions whose 
scholastic records are below the standards for admission to full graduate standing 
may be admitted provisionally when unavoidable, extenuating circumstances af- 
fected their undergraduate averages or when progressive improvement in their un- 
dergraduate work warrants provisional admission. 

A graduate student admitted to provisional status is not eligible for appointment 
to an assistantship or fellowship. Full graduate standing is granted when the 
deficiencies responsible for the provisional status are corrected, provided the stu- 
dent has maintained a satisfactory academic record (3.0 Grade Point Average) on 
all course work taken in a graduate classification. A change from provisional status 
to full graduate standing is effected only upon the recommendation of the depart- 
ment in which the student is seeking the degree. 

GRADUATE- UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS 

The Graduate-Unclassified status is a temporary classification and students ad- 
mitted to this status are not candidates for degrees. They may take courses for 
graduate credit but may not apply more than 10 credits earned while in this status 
to any program leading to an advanced degree at this institution. Unclassified 



26 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

graduate students are expected to meet the same admissions requirements that ap- 
ply to graduate students in full standing. Any individual having an interest in ap- 
plying for admission as a Graduate-Unclassified Student should correspond with 
the Graduate Dean describing his or her particular interest and objective prior to 
making application. 

POST-BACCALAUREATE STUDIES (PBS) 

The Post-Baccalaureate Studies (PBS) classification is designed for students who 
wish to undertake academic work beyond the baccalaureate degree but who are not 
currently admitted to a degree program. The following policies apply to students 
who wish to register for PBS: 

1. All must have baccalaureate degrees from accredited institutions of higher 
education. 

2. Registration is through the Division of Continuing Education; the submission 
of transcripts is not required. PBS students may register for course work at 
any level. Registration for regular course credit (A, B, C, D, NC or S, U) at the 
500- and 600-levels is limited to a total of nine semester hours. (Hours com- 
pleted in the "Graduate Special" classification which was discontinued at the 
end of the 1974 fall semester or in any other graduate classification at North 
Carolina State University will be included in the nine hours permitted.) PBS 
students may register for further course work at the 500- and 600-levels for 
"Credit Only." 

3. Registration is normally limited to a maximum of two courses per semester. 
Individuals who are employed full-time should limit their PBS registrations 
to one course per semester. 

4. The PBS classification carries with it no implication that the student will be 
admitted to the Graduate School in any degree classification. 

5. A PBS student who is in due course admitted to a graduate degree 
program may request that a maximum of nine hours of course work at 
the 400-level or above taken for regular course credit (A, B, C, D, NC or S, 
U) be considered for graduate degree credit. No course taken for "Credit 
Only" (which is graded "CS" or "CU") may be considered for graduate 
degree credit. All course work accepted for degree credit must be ap- 
proved by the student's advisory committee as being germane to the 
program. Requests for degree credit for courses completed in the PBS 
classification are considered after admission to a graduate degree 
program when the student's Plan of Graduate Work is filed with the 
Graduate School. 
6. PBS students are expected to familiarize themselves with Graduate School 
policies and to seek further advice or clarification as needed. 

Certificate Renewal 

Public school personnel who are primarily interested in "certification credit" 
may enroll in the PBS program through the Division of Continuing Education 
without forwarding transcripts of previous work to the Graduate School. In such 
cases, the School of Education will be responsible for assessing the adequacy of the 
applicant's qualifications for enrollment in the course(s) concerned. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 27 

Registration 

The Office of Registration and Records must have authorization from the Dean 
of the Graduate School before a graduate student in any classification will be per- 
mitted to register for classes. This authorization will be sent to the Office of 
Registration and Records at the time the student is notified of acceptance for 
graduate study. All students attending classes must be registered for credit or 
audit. 

PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS 

All students admitted to degree programs are required to submit a Report of 
Medical History and Health Evaluation prior to completing their initial registra- 
tion. All non-degree students taking eight or more hours of course work are re- 
quired to submit a Report of Medical History and Health Evaluation prior to com- 
pleting registration for the first fall or spring semester during which they enroll in 
such a course load. 

INTERINSTITUTIONAL REGISTRATION 

North Carolina State University participates in an Interinstitutional Registra- 
tion program with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University 
of North Carolina at Greensboro and Duke University. Under this agreement, 
graduate students enrolled at this University may undertake course work on these 
campuses upon the recommendation of their advisory committees. 

Even though taking a course on another campus, the graduate student is ex- 
clusively under the administrative direction of the North Carolina State University 
Graduate School. Enrollment for courses on other campuses will take place on this 
campus, using special forms obtained from the Office of Registration and Records. 
The Graduate School shall consider courses taken on other campuses as a part of 
the student's normal load, and the billing for such work will be through the Office 
of Business Affairs. The procedures followed in the summer sessions are somewhat 
different; detailed instructions are available in the Office of Registration and 
Records. 

When the grading system on the campus being visited is different from the 
North Carolina State University system, grades received under Interinstitutional 
Registration will be converted to the North Carolina State University system. "H," 
"P," "L" and "F" grades earned at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
and "E," "G," "S" and "F" grades earned at Duke University will be converted to 
"A," "B," "C" and "F" grades, respectively. 

COURSE LOAD 

A full-time graduate course load is 9 to 15 credits per semester (including audits) 
and 6 credits per summer session (including audits). Audits in subjects in which the 
student has no previous experience will be evaluated at full credit value in deter- 
mining course load. Audits taken as repetition of work previously accomplished are 
considered at one half of their value in calculating course loads. With the single ex- 
ception of foreign language audits, all audit registrations must fall within the 



28 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

range of maximum permissible course loads. 

Graduate students holding assistantships are restricted to the following max- 
imum semester course loads: full time, 3 hours; three-quarters time, 6 hours; one- 
half time, 9 hours; one-quarter time, 12 hours. Additionally, graduate assistants 
are limited to the following maximum totals of credit hours over the duration of 
their appointments: 

Sennce Obligation Length of Appointment Maximum Credit Hours 

Full time 9 months 6 

Full time 12 months 9 

3/4 time 9 months 12 

3/4 time 12 months 16 

1/2 time 9 months 18 

1/2 time 12 months 24 

1/4 time 9 months 24 

1/4 time 12 months 30 

SENIORS 

A member of the senior class may, with prior approval of the Dean of the 
Graduate School, register for graduate credit in courses at the 500-level as long as 
the combined graduate and undergraduate credit load is not more than 15 hours. 
No more than six hours of graduate credit may be accumulated by an un- 
dergraduate student, and those graduate credits may not be applied toward the re- 
quirements for a baccalaureate degree. Courses at the 600-level are not ordinarily 
open to undergraduates, although occasional exceptions are made for honor stu- 
dents. 

Seniors desiring to take courses for graduate credit should contact their major 
advisors who will forward appropriate requests to the Graduate Dean for approval. 

AUDITS 

Students wishing to audit courses must have the approval of their advisers and 
of the instructors teaching the courses. While auditors receive no course credit, 
they are expected to attend class regularly. The degree to which auditors must par- 
ticipate in class beyond regular attendance is optional with the instructors; any 
such requirements should be clearly explained to the auditors in writing at the 
beginning of the semester. An instructor who feels that an auditor has failed to 
fulfill the stipulated requirements is justified in marking "NR" (no recognition 
given for audit) on the grade report roll. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



29 



Tuition and Fees 

For academic years 1977-78 and 1978-79*: 

SEMESTER RATES 

RESIDENTS OF NORTH CAROLINA*^ 





Tuition and 


Required 




Hours 


Academic Fee 


Fees 


Total 


1-4 


$ 61.00 


$97.15 


$158.15 


5-7 


122.00 


97.15 


219.15 


8 or more 


182.00 


97.15 


279.15 




NONRESIDENTS*** 






Tuition and 


Required 




Hours 


Academic Fee 


Fees 


Total 


1-4 


$ 346.00 


$97.15 


$ 443.15 


5-7 


692.00 


97.15 


789.15 


8 or more 


1,038.00 


97.15 


1,135.15 




REQUIRED FEES 






Medical 


$25.00 






Athletic 


15.00 






Special 


55.15 






School 


2.00 





$97.15 

SUMMER RATES (PER SESSION) 

RESIDENTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 



Hours 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 



Tuition and 


Required 


Academic Fee 


Fees 


$21.00 


$33.00 


34.00 


33.00 


47.00 


33.00 


60.00 


33.00 


73.00 


33.00 


86.00 


33.00 



Total 

$ 54.00 

67.00 

80.00 

93.00 

106.00 

119.00 



'Tuition and fee rates are subject to change. 
**For definition of in-state and out-of-state rates, see pp. 32-33. 

***Under certain conditions, nonresident students who have been solicited for a special talent and have been offered an 
assistantship, traineeship, or fellowship may be eligible for reduced tuition rates. 



30 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



NONRESIDENTS 

Tuition and Required 



Hours 


Academic Fee 


Fees 


1 


$ 63.00 


$33.00 


2 


119.00 


33.00 


3 


175.00 


33.00 


4 


231.00 


33.00 


5 


287.00 


33.00 


6 


343.00 


33.00 




REQUIRED FEES 




Medical 


$10.00 




Student Center 


17.50 




Physical Education 


5.50 



Total 
$ 96.00 
152.00 
208.00 
264.00 
320.00 
376.00 



$33.00 



SPECIAL REGISTRATION AND FEES 



Summer Research (GR 596S or GR 696S) 

For graduate students whose programs of work specify no formal course work 

during a summer session and who will be devoting full time to thesis research. 

Per Summer Session In Residence ($32.00 plus $33.00 fees) $65.00 

*Per Summer Session Not In Residence 32.00 

Examination Only (GR 597) 

For graduate students in master's programs not requiring a thesis who have 
completed all requirements except the final oral examination by the beginning 
of the term in which the degree is to be awarded. 

Per Semester In Residence ($21.00 plus $97.15 fees) $118.15 

*Per Semester Not In Residence 21.00 

Per Summer Session In Residence ($21.00 plus $33.00 fees) 54.00 

*Per Summer Session Not In Residence 21.00 

Thesis Preparation Only (GR 598 or GR 698) 

For graduate students who have completed all course work, research, and 
residence requirements and who are writing a thesis or dissertation. 

Per Semester In Residence ($32.00 plus $97.15 fees) $129.15 

*Per Semester Not In Residence 32.00 

Per Summer Session In Residence ($32.00 plus $33.00 fees) 65.00 

*Per Summer Session Not In Residence 32.00 



*A statement from the employer, department head, or major adviser indicating the student will not be residing in the 
Raleigh area during the term must be submitted to the Office of Business Affairs to qualify for the reduced rate. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 31 

Dissertation Research (GR 697) 

For doctoral students who have scheduled no formal course work during a given 
term, who have passed the preliminary examinations, who have completed at 
least six hours of departmental research on the doctoral program, and who are 
devoting full time to the dissertation. Students so registered are full-time; the 
course carries no credit hour designation. 

Tuition and fees are the same as for Thesis Preparation, above. 

Audits 

During semester when registered and One audit free, each additional 

paying for other course work audit same cost as for credit 

During semester when not registered 

for other course work Same cost as for credit 

During any summer session Same cost as for credit 

Full-time Faculty or Staff $ 7.00 

Microfilming Doctoral Dissertation $27.00 

PART-TIME STUDENTS 

Part-time students are defined as persons registered for seven hours or less 
whose school work is incidental to their primary occupation. Part-time students 
must complete an "Application for Cancellation of Non-academic Fees" each 
semester to qualify for the reduced rates. Any students registered for eight (8) or 
more hours during a semester will be charged full tuition and fees. 

FULL-TIME FACULTY AND EMPLOYEES 

Full-time faculty of instructor rank and above and other full-time employees of 
the University who hold membership in the Teachers' and State Employees' Retire- 
ment System may register for credit or as auditors with free tuition privileges for 
one course in any academic term at any campus of the University of North 
Carolina. Free tuition privileges apply only during the period of employment and 
do not include such charges as registration, laboratory, or other special fees. A 
nine-month employee is not entitled to free tuition in summer terms unless em- 
ployed during the term for which the free tuition is sought. Each applicant for free 
tuition must submit through regular channels a form provided by the University. 



32 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

REFUND OF TUITION AND FEES 

A student who officially withdraws from school during the first two weeks of a 
semester or by the end of the fourth day of a summer session will receive a tuition 
and fees refund of the full amount paid less a registration fee. The withheld fee 
amounts to $15 the first week and $25 the second week. After the two week period, 
no refund will be made. 

In some instances, circumstances justify the waiving of rules regarding refunds. 
An example might be withdrawal because of sickness. Students have the privilege 
of appeal to the Refund of Fees Committee when they feel special consideration is 
merited. Applications for such appeals may be obtained from the Office of Business 
Affairs. 

RESIDENCE STATUS 

Until May of 1973, determination of a student's residence status for tuition pur- 
poses rested upon the easily administered statutory requirement that "a legal resi- 
dent must have maintained his domicile in North Carolina for at least 12 months 
next preceding the date of enrollment or re-enrollment in an institution of higher 
education in this State," with the express proviso that "student status in an institu- 
tion of higher learning in this State shall not constitute eligibility for residence to 
qualify said student for in-state tuition" (G.S. 116-143.1, 1971) (emphasis added). 
The administrative consequence of this law was to make necessary, in most cases, 
only one inquiry concerning residence status for each student, at the outset of the 
higher education experience, since time spent enrolled as a student could not be 
counted in satisfaction of the 12-month eligibility requirement. 

The 1973 Session of the General Assembly amended the applicable law, so as to 
read in pertinent part as follows: 

"(b) To qualify for in-state tuition a legal resident must have maintained his 
domicile in North Carolina for at least the 12 months immediately prior to his 
classification as a resident for tuition purposes. In order to be eligible for such 
classification, the individual must establish that his or her presence in the State 
during such 12-month period was for purposes of maintaining a bona fide domicile 
rather than for purposes of merely temporary residence incident to enrollment in 
an institution of higher education; further, (1) if the parents (or court-appointed 
legal guardian) of the individual seeking resident classification are (is) bona fide 
domiciliaries of this State, this fact shall be prima facie evidence of domiciliary 
status of the individual applicant and (2) if such parents or guardian are not bona 
fide domiciliaries of this State, this fact shall be prima facie evidence of non- 
domiciliary status of the individual." (University regulations concerning the 
classification of students by residence, for purposes of applicable tuition differen- 
tials, are set forth in detail in A Manual to Assist The Public Higher Education In- 
stitutions of North Carolina in the Matter of Student Residence Classification for 
Tuition Purposes. Each enrolled student is responsible for knowing the contents of 
that Manual, which is the controlling administrative statement of policy on this 
subject. Copies of the Manual are available for review on request at the Admissions 
Office, 112 Peele Hall, North Carolina State University.) 

The essential change effected by the 1973 amendment to this statute is that a 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 33 

person who is an enrolled student is no longer necessarily precluded from 
demonstrating during the period of one's enrollment that he or she in fact has 
become a legal resident of North Carolina entitled to the in-state tuition rate. The 
administrative consequences of this modification of the law are substantial. Two 
inquiries are mandated by the statute. First, has the applicant for classification as 
a legal resident in fact resided in North Carolina for a minimum period of 12 
months immediately prior to the proposed effective date of his or her classification 
as a resident for tuition purposes? Second, during the 12-month period in question, 
did the applicant's presence in the State constitute legal residence? Thus, a 
carefully detailed inquiry must be made in each such case concerning the residen- 
tial status of the applicant, as measured by established legal principles which con- 
trol the disposition of questions about the place of legal residence of an individual. 

CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES 

A. Initial Classification — A student admitted to initial enrollment in an institu- 
tion (or permitted to re-enroll following an absence from the institutional program 
which involved a formal withdrawal from enrollment) shall be classified by the ad- 
mitting institution either as a resident or as a nonresident, for tuition purposes, 
prior to actual matriculation. Particular officials or offices of the institution shall 
be designated to evaluate all such initial classification cases and to assign an ap- 
propriate classification consistent with the requirements of State law and the 
provisions of this manual. Basic data on which such assignment shall be based 
shall be collected in accordance with the common informational form prescribed 
herein (see Appendix B of Residence Manual, 1973, as revised 7/74 and 7/75, 
NCSU); additional data or documentation deemed essential to a reliable determina- 
tion may be elicited from the student, as deemed appropriate by the responsible of- 
ficial or office. 

B. Subsequent Classification Inquiries: Reclassification — A residential 
classification once assigned (and confirmed pursuant to any appellate process in- 
voked) may be changed thereafter only at intervals corresponding with the es- 
tablished primary divisions of the academic calendar of the institution, viz., at the 
beginning of a semester, quarter, or otherwise denominated basic interval of the 
academic calendar. No change in residential status for tuition purposes (and thus 
no change in applicable billing rates) shall be effected during such a semester, 
quarter, or term, with resulting increases or decreases in the tuition obligation on a 
pro rata basis for a portion of such semester, quarter, or term. 

The institution shall provide to each student at the time of and in connection 
with the transmission to him or her of each periodic bill for tuition charges a notice 
of the circumstances under which and the time at which a change in classification 
may occur. The notice shall be of the type prescribed in Appendix C of the 
Residence Manual, July, 1973, as revised 7/74 and 7/75, NSCU. 

Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships 

Graduate students may receive financial support through fellowships, 
traineeships, and teaching or research assistantships sponsored by federal, state, 



34 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

and private agencies. Prospective students may request consideration for financial 
assistance by completing the appropriate sections of the admissions application 
form. Applicants for these awards should correspond directly with the department 
of major interest concerning the availability of awards and related information. 
Enrolled students should contact the major department. Prospective and enrolled 
graduate students are encouraged to apply for national, regional and foundation 
fellowships in addition to awards sponsored through the University. 

Stipend levels, dependency allowance and tuition payments for fellowships vary 
among sponsoring agencies. In 1977, one-half time assistantships carried stipends 
ranging from $3,100 to $5,200 per academic year for teaching assistants and sti- 
pends ranging to $6,000 for research assistants per calendar year, depending on ex- 
perience. The University offers approximately 1,000 assistantships each year. 

All awardees are responsible for tuition payments as determined by their 
residence status unless payment is specifically provided for by the terms of the 
fellowship or traineeship grant. Non-resident students solicited for special talent 
and thereby appointed by the University to a fellowship, traineeship or 
assistantship may be considered for a special tuition rate. Further information 
may be obtained by contacting the Graduate School office or the department of ma- 
jor interest. 

A partial listing of sponsoring agencies includes the following: Agency for Inter- 
national Development, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Aluminum Com- 
pany of America, American Chemical Society, American Institute of Architecture, 
American Institute of Industrial Engineers, American Lung Association, 
Amerikan Enka, Associated General Contractors, Association of Synthetic Yarn 
Manufacturers, Inc., Atomic Energy Commission, Blythe Brothers Company, 
Burlington Industries, Carolina Power and Light Company, Carolina Starlite Com- 
pany, Carolina Tractor and Equipment Company, Celanese Corporation, Champion 
International, Chemstrand, Cities Service Foundation, Cotton, Inc., Crown Zeller- 
bach Foundation, Department of Transportation, Douglas Aircraft Company, Dow 
Chemical Company, Dreyfus Foundation, E. I. DuPont de Nemours Company, E. 
Sigurd Johnson, Eastman Kodak Company, Environmental Protection Agency, 
Ford Foundation, Ford Motor Company, General Electric Foundation, General 
Foods Corporation, Gifford-Hill and Company, Goodyear Tire and Rubber Com- 
pany, Hercules, Inc., Hercules Powder Company, International Institute of Educa- 
tion, International Nickel Corporation, International Potato Center (Peru), ITT 
Rayonier Foundation, Lockheed Aircraft, Martin-Marietta Aggregates, Marine 
Science Development Grants, Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing, Monsanto 
Chemical Company, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National In- 
stitutes of Health, National Science Foundation, N. C. Agricultural Foundation, N. 
C. Board of Science and Technology, N. C. Chapter of the Soil Conservation Society 
of America, N. C. Department of Administration, N. C. Department of Human 
Resources, N. C. Department of Natural and Economic Resources, N. C. Grange, N. 
C. State Board of Education, N. C. Textile Foundation, Office of Education 
(Department of Health, Education and Welfare), Owens-Corning Fiberglass Cor- 
poration, Partitions, Inc., Pfizer, Inc., Phillips Petroleum Company, Plastics In- 
stitute of America, Proctor and Gamble, Pulp and Paper Foundation, Inc., R. J. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 35 

Reynolds Tobacco Company, Ready-Mixed Concrete Company, Resources for the 
Future, Reynolds Metals Company, Rockefeller Foundation, Shell Companies 
Foundation, The Sherwin-Williams Company, Southeastern Association of Game 
and Fish Commissions, Southeastern Cooperative Fish and Game Statistics Pro- 
ject, Southeastern Gas Association, Southern Furniture Manufacturers Associa- 
tion, Union Camp Corporation, U. S. Army, U. S. Department of Agriculture, U. S. 
Department of the Interior, U. S. Department of Transportation, U. S. Forest Ser- 
vice, U. S. Office of Education, U. S. Public Health Service, The University of 
North Carolina Sea Grant Program, The W. K. Kellogg Foundation, Walker Mar- 
tin, Water Resources Research Institute, Western Electric Company, 
Weyerhaeuser Company, William A. Pahl Company. 

Other Financial Aid 

NATIONAL DIRECT STUDENT LOANS 
(Formerly National Defense Student Loans) 

Graduate students who are American citizens may apply to the Financial Aid Of- 
fice for consideration for long term, low interest loans. To qualify for loans stu- 
dents must be making satisfactory academic progress and must show financial 
need. Students are expected to apply for and to accept any available assistantships 
before applying for loans. 

Graduate students may borrow up to $10,000 inclusive of any undergraduate 
National Direct Student (National Defense Student) Loans. There is no interest on 
the loan while the borrower is a full- or half-time student at an institution of higher 
education. Nine months after ceasing to be at least a half-time student, interest 
begins at three percent per year. The repayment period begins at the same time. A 
ten year repayment period is possible for large indebtedness; however, a minimum 
payment of $30 per month is required. Interest does not accrue and repayment in- 
stallments may be postponed during any period not in excess of three years during 
which the borrower is a member of the Armed Forces of the United States or is a 
Peace Corps or Vista volunteer. Reduction of obligations to repay may result from 
teaching in schools with high concentrations of low income families or from 
teaching handicapped children. Military service qualifies for cancellation as 
follows: If, after June 30, 1972, the loan maker serves as a member of the Armed 
Forces of the United States, up to 50 per cent of the principal amount of this loan 
shall be reduced at a rate of 12 1/2 per cent of the total principal amount of the 
loan, plus interest thereon, for each complete year of service in an area of 
hostilities that qualifies for special pay under section 310 of Title 37, United States 
Code. 

Institutional Long Term Loans: These loans are made from University funds. In- 
stitutional loans are made and are to be repaid under the same terms as the 
National Direct Student Loans except that there are no forgiveness features. 

Insured Loan Program: This program provides loans from private lenders. 
Procedures are different in each state. Information and applications for 
available loans may be obtained in the Financial Aid Office. Interest is at 



36 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

seven percent per year with the Federal Government paying the interest dur- 
ing the in-school period for students who qualify because of the financial cir- 
cumstances of their families. 

Legal residents of North Carolina who are enrolled in a degree program may 
borrow through College Foundation, Inc. a maximum of $5,000 or the total cost of 
education, whichever is less. A maximum of $15,000 may be borrowed for all un- 
dergraduate and graduate school Guaranteed/Insured Loans. College Foundation 
Loans are insured by the North Carolina Education Assistance Authority or the 
United States Office of Education and under certain conditions the Office of 
Education pays the seven percent interest during the in-school and grace periods. 
Students from other states may obtain information about similar plans. 

PART-TIME JOBS 

The College Work Study Program is a federal program designed to guarantee 
part-time jobs to students who show need of financial assistance. The same ap- 
plication is used to apply for loans and jobs. Effort is made to assign students to 
jobs in keeping with their special interests and skills. 

Other jobs not based on need are listed at the Financial Aid Office, and are open 
to all students. 

SHORT-TERM EMERGENCY LOANS 

Loans, usually in amounts of $100 or less, to meet emergency expenses may be 
obtained on short notice at the Financial Aid Office. These loans, in that they are 
designed for short term, emergency use, should be repaid within about 30 days. A 
loan may not be taken out between semesters or summer sessions. 



Military Education and Training 

The Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) selects interested University stu- 
dents who are to be enrolled in Army ROTC or in Air Force ROTC for officer educa- 
tion and training leading toward a commission. 

The Army and Air Force ROTC departments educate and train University stu- 
dents, graduate and undergraduate, for a commission in their respective military 
services. These students must have four full semesters (undergraduate or 
graduate) remaining at the time they enter the ROTC Program, (exceptions for 
Army ROTC are noted below). Uniforms and books for ROTC are provided. 
Transfer credit is allowed for previous ROTC course work at other institutions. 

Graduate students who will be at NCSU for at least two years may, upon suc- 
cesful completion of a six-weeks summer training period, be enrolled in the Air 
Force ROTC Program. This summer training period is not a requirement for the 
Army ROTC Program. 

Air Force ROTC offers a Flight Training Program for selected cadets which is 
conducted by a local civilian flying school at no expense to the student. Students 
successfully completing ROTC flight training may be selected for further flight 
training as an Air Force pilot. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 37 

Graduate students enrolled in the junior or senior years of ROTC receive $100 
per month. Scholarships which pay all tuition, fees and costs of required textbooks 
in addition to the $100 per month are available on a competitive basis. 

Special provisions for veterans are made in Army ROTC whereby they are gran- 
ted placement credit for their prior service experience and training. Additionally, 
Army ROTC offers the student several points of entry into the ROTC Program, un- 
der a process of granting ROTC placement credit for college courses or other 
worthwhile experiences that contribute to the requisite skills of a second lieute- 
nant. Army ROTC Counselors are available to evaluate the student's prior learning 
experiences and advise him as to where he could be placed in ROTC. 

Additional information on Army ROTC may be obtained from the Professor of 
Military Science, Room 154, Reynolds Coliseum and on Air Force ROTC from the 
Professor of Aerospace Studies, Room 145, Reynolds Coliseum. 



Health Services 

The Student Health Service, located in Clark Hall Infirmary, offers health care 
to students on an outpatient and inpatient basis. The 50-bed facility is fully staffed 
by five full-time physicians, two Family Nurse Practitioners, a pharmacist, 
registered nurses, laboratory technicians, and other support staff. 

During scheduled academic sessions, the Health Service is open 24 hours a day, 
seven days a week. Physicians maintain regular office hours Monday through Fri- 
day and are on call at all times to assist the nurses on duty when the condition of a 
patient warrants immediate attention. 

Only currently enrolled students who have paid the student health fee as part of 
their general University fees are eligible for medical care. The student health fee 
covers professional services both outpatient and inpatient; i.e., visits to M.D., 
laboratory tests and X-rays performed in the Student Health Service and all 
medications available in the student pharmacy. 

The University annually offers students the opportunity to enroll in a student 
group health and accident insurance plan which provides for the cost of referrals to 
off-campus specialists or to local hospitals for surgery and serious illnesses. 

Foreign students are required to enroll in a student health insurance program. 



Housing 

The University operates 16 residence halls for single students with a total 
capacity to accommodate 3,759 men and 1,761 women. Six of the halls are arranged 
in suites of four or five rooms with a common bathroom and the other ten have 
rooms which open onto a central corridor with bathrooms at intervals. All rooms 
are designed for double occupancy and are furnished except for pillows and linen. 
An optional linen rental service is available through the Auxiliary Services Office. 

The rental fee for a residence hall room is $210 per semester for the 1977-78 year 
and may increase in future years. New freshmen and continuing residents have 



38 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

priority for a room assignment over new graduate students. Because of the demand 
for on-campus housing, it is unlikely that new graduate students may obtain a 
residence hall room during a fall semester. Information about off -campus housing 
is available in the Residence Life Office. 

The University also maintains 300 apartments for married students, including 
efficiency, one-bedroom, and two-bedroom units. The monthly rental rates for the 
1977-78 year are $60.00 for efficiencies, $71.00 for one-bedroom apartments, and 
$82.00 for the two-bedroom units. All apartments have built-in dresser drawers, a 
stove, and a refrigerator. Efficiency apartments also include a sofa-bed. 

The University does not operate a trailer park, but there are privately owned 
parks within a reasonable distance of the campus. Food service is available in the 
University Student Center and at several snack bars on campus. 

All inquiries concerning housing and all applications for reservations should be 
directed to the Department of Residence Life, Box 5072, North Carolina State Uni- 
versity, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 (telephone 919/737-2440). 

Additional Information 

If additional information is needed, contact the Graduate School, 104 Peele Hall, 
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N.C. 27607. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 39 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

The Graduate School offers programs of study leading to the master's degree in 
72 fields and the doctorate in 45. Each student's program is planned with an ad- 
visory committee of graduate faculty members to provide the opportunity for gain- 
ing advanced knowledge in the particular field of study. Emphasis is placed upon 
the student's scholarly development through formal course work, seminars, 
research and independent investigation. 

Graduate students are expected to familiarize themselves with the requirements 
for the degrees for which they are candidates and are held responsible for the 
fulfillment of these requirements. 

Master's Degrees 

The Graduate School offers programs of study leading to the Master of Science 
degree, the Master of Arts degree, and the Master's degree in certain designated 
fields. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE AND MASTER OF ARTS 

For all Master of Science and Master of Arts degrees, the programs are planned 
with the objective of making possible a reasonable, comprehensive mastery of the 
subject matter in the chosen field. Training and experience in research are provided 
to familiarize the student with the methods, ideals and goals of independent in- 
vestigation. 

The Master of Science is awarded in the following fields: 

Adult and Community College Education Engineering Science and Mechanics* 

Agricultural Economics Entomology 

Agricultural Education Food Science 

Animal Science Forestry 

Applied Mathematics Genetics 

Biochemistry Geology 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering Guidance and Personnel Services 

Biomathematics Horticultural Science 

Botany Industrial Arts Education 

Chemical Engineering Industrial Engineering 

Chemistry Management 

Civil Engineering Marine Sciences 

Computer Studies Materials Engineering 

Crop Science Mathematics 

Curriculum and Instruction Mathematics Education 

Ecology Mechanical Engineering 

Educational Administration and Supervision Meteorology 

Electrical Engineering Microbiology 



*No new applications being accepted. Students interested in this area should contact the Dean of the School of Engineering. 



40 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Nuclear Engineering Rural Sociology 

Nutrition Science Education 

Occupational Education Soil Science 

Operations Research Special Education 

Physics Statistics 

Physiology Textile Chemistry 

Plant Pathology Textiles 

Poultry Science Vocational Industrial Education 

Psychology Wildlife Biology 

Recreation Resources Wood and Paper Science 

Administration Zoology 

The Master of Arts is offered in Economics, English, History and Political 
Science. 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE AND PLAN OF GRADUATE WORK 

The advisory committee is composed of at least three members of the Graduate 
Faculty, one of whom represents the supporting area. This committee is appointed 
by the Graduate Dean upon the recommendation of the head of the major depart- 
ment. 

The student's program of study is planned so as to provide a comprehensive view 
of the major field of interest and to provide training in research in this field and 
related areas of knowledge. As great a latitude is permitted in the selection of 
courses as is compatible with a well-defined major and supporting courses. In 
general, it is expected that approximately two-thirds of the course work will be in 
the major and one-third in supporting courses. Since there are many possible com- 
binations of course work, a specific Plan of Graduate Work is developed by the ad- 
visory committee with the student. The program of course work to be followed by 
the student and the thesis problem selected must be approved by the student's ad- 
visory committee, the head of the department and the Graduate School. The Plan 
of Graduate Work should be submitted to the Graduate School for approval prior 
to completion of one-half of the program. 

RESIDENCE 

Students engaged in a course of study leading to the Master of Science or Master 
of Arts are required to be in residence, pursuing graduate work, for a minimum of 
one full academic year or its equivalent. 

CREDITS 

A minimum of 30 semester credits is required for the Master of Science or 
Master of Arts; however, the number of credit hours included in a Plan of Graduate 
Work often exceeds this minimum. At least 20 semester hours must come from 
500- and 600-level courses, with no fewer than six credits being at the 600-level. The 
program may include no more than six hours of research and no more than two 
hours of departmental seminar, unless the total program exceeds 30 hours. Courses 
at the 400-level counted toward the minimal 30-hour requirement may not come 
from the major field. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 41 

CREDIT FROM OUTSIDE SOURCES 

1. Generally, no more than six of the required academic credits will be accepted 
from other institutions. A graduate course may be considered for transfer to a 
master's program provided it has been completed in a graduate classification 
at an accredited graduate school with a grade of "B" or better. 

2. No graduate credit will be allowed for excess credits completed in an un- 
dergraduate classification at another institution. 

3. A maximum of six semester credits earned through North Carolina State 
University Extension study may be applied toward degree requirements 
provided the courses are graduate level and are taught by members of the 
University graduate faculty. If a student has been admitted to the Graduate 
School and an approved Plan of Graduate Work has been submitted, six ad- 
ditional semester credits may be obtained in off-campus North Carolina State 
University graduate courses to apply toward the minimal credit hour require- 
ment for the degree. Credit accepted by extension reduces the amount of 
credit which may be transferred from other institutions. 

GRADING AND ACADEMIC STANDING 

Performance in lecture courses is evaluated as "A" (Excellent), "B" (Good), "C" 
(Passing), "D" or "NC" (No Credit). In order to receive graduate degree credit, a 
grade of "C" or higher is required. 

Performance in research, seminar and special problems courses is evaluated as 
either "S" (Satisfactory) or "U" (Unsatisfactory), and these grades are not used in 
computing the Grade Point Average. However, a student who receives a "U" on any 
course will not receive credit for that course and may be required to repeat it. 

The grade of "IN" (Incomplete) may be given in any course at the discretion of 
the instructor. A student who receives an "IN" must complete the unfinished work 
to have the Incomplete converted to a final grade by the end of the next semester in 
residence; otherwise, the "IN" will be automatically converted to "NC". 

Except in the case of Interinstitutional Registration (see p. 27), grades on courses 
transferred from another institution will not be included in computing the Grade 
Point Average. 

Graduate students are placed on academic probation if they accumulate nine or 
more but less than eighteen credit hours at the 400-level or above and have a grade 
point average of less than 3.0 ("B" average). A student's graduate study is ter- 
minated if eighteen or more credit hours at the 400-level or above are accumulated 
with a grade point average of less than 3.0 ("B" average). In the case of program 
termination, no further registration in a graduate classification will be permitted. 
Under extenuating circumstances the student will be reinstated upon the written 
recommendation of the department and approval by the Graduate Dean. (Effective 
Fall 1978 for all graduate students.) Departments do have the prerogative of 
recommending the termination of a student's graduate admission at any time. 

A student on academic probation is not eligible for appointment to a graduate 
fellowship or assistantship. 



42 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS 

A reading knowledge of one modern foreign language (Germanic, Romance or 
Slavic) is required of students pursuing the Master of Arts in English and of stu- 
dents engaged in the Master of Science programs in chemistry and mathematics. 
Students working towards the Master of Arts in history will be expected to 
demonstrate a reading ability in a foreign language appropriate to the field of in- 
terest or, with the approval of their advisory committees, proficiency in an alter- 
nate skill (such as statistics, econometrics or computer science) relevant to their 
research. In the Master of Arts program in politics, competence in a foreign 
language or in research methodology is required. The Departments of Entomology 
and Mathematics and Science Education leave the decision to the student's ad- 
visory committee. 

Proficiency can be demonstrated in one of two ways: 

1. By passing a traditional reading knowledge examination, which can be re- 
quested by the student at any time. 

2. By passing the final examination in a course especially designed for graduate 
students who have no previous knowledge of a foreign language or who wish 
to refresh their knowledge of a language. The Department of Foreign 
Languages and Literatures offers such courses, normally in the fall, for each 
of the three major foreign languages: French (FLF 401), German (FLG 401) 
and Spanish (FLS 401). These courses concentrate exclusively on teaching stu- 
dents to understand the written word and do not provide instruction or testing 
in speaking and original composition. Failure to pass the course carries with it 
no penalty other than the fact that the student's language requirement will 
remain unfulfilled. These courses are neither counted for credit nor used in 
computing Grade Point Average. 

THESIS 

Theses prepared by candidates for the Master of Science or Master of Arts degree 
must represent an original investigation into a subject which has been approved by 
the student's advisory committee and the head of the major department. Three 
copies of the thesis in final form as approved by the advisory committee, each 
signed by the members of the advisory committee, must be submitted to the 
Graduate School at least four weeks before the end of the semester or summer ses- 
sion in which the degree is to be conferred. Detailed information on form and 
organization of the thesis is presented in the University's Guide for the Prepara- 
tion of Theses, which is available in the Graduate School office. 

COMPREHENSIVE WRITTEN EXAMINATIONS 

Written examinations covering the subject matter of the major and supporting 
fields may be required of the candidate. When required, such examinations must 
be successfully completed prior to requesting the comprehensive oral examination. 
Information concerning written examination schedules should be obtained from 
the student's major department. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 43 

COMPREHENSIVE ORAL EXAMINATIONS 

A candidate for the Master of Science or Master of Arts degree must pass a com- 
prehensive oral examination to demonstrate to the advisory committee that he or 
she possesses a reasonable mastery of the subject matter of the major and sup- 
porting fields and that this knowledge can be used with promptness and accuracy. 
This examination may not be held until all other requirements, except completion 
of the course work for the final semester, are satisfied. Application for the ex- 
amination must be filed with the Dean of the Graduate School by the chairman of 
the advisory committee at least two weeks prior to the date on which the examina- 
tion is to be held. 

A unanimous vote of approval by the advisory committee is required for passing 
the oral examination. Approval of the examination may be conditioned, however, 
upon the completion of additional work to the satisfaction of the advisory commit- 
tee. A formal reexamination will not be required in this case. Failure of a student 
to pass the oral examination terminates the student's graduate work at this institu- 
tion unless otherwise unanimously recommended by the advisory committee. Only 
one reexamination will be permitted. All committee actions may be appealed by 
written application to the Graduate Dean. 

TIME LIMIT 

All requirements for the master's degree must be completed within six calendar 
years, beginning with the date the student commences courses carrying graduate 
credit applicable to the degree program, unless a more restrictive time limit has 
been established by the academic school. 



MASTER'S DEGREE IN A DESIGNATED FIELD 

The University offers a number of master's degree programs in designated 
fields. The degree offerings are listed below. These programs vary in requirements 
and persons having an interest in these programs are advised to contact the major 
department for further information including specific prerequisites and degree re- 
quirements. General Graduate School policies as stated on pages 40 through 43 ap- 
ply to these degree programs with the exception of references to the master's 
thesis.* 

Following is a listing of the degrees that may be awarded upon the completion of 
the course of study in a designed field: 

Master of Agriculture Master of Biomathematics 

Master of Architecture Master of Chemical Engineering 

Master of Biological and Master of Civil Engineering 

Agricultural Engineering Master of Computer Studies 



'Students in programs leading to the Master of Education degree may elect a thesis option or they may complete the 
course "Introduction to Educational Inquiry" or a departmental course in research and a problem report. 



44 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Master of Economics 
Master of Education* 
Master of Electrical Engineering 
Master of Engineering** 
Master of Engineering Science 

and Mechanics*** 
Master of Forestry 
Master of Industrial Engineering 
Master of Technology for 

International Development 
Master of Landscape Architecture 



Master of Life Sciences 
Master of Mechanical Engineering 
Master of Product Design 
Master of Public Affairs 
Master of Recreation Resources 
Master of Sociology 
Master of Statistics 
Master of Textiles 
Master of Urban Design*** 
Master of Wildlife Biology 
Master of Wood and Paper Science 



Summary of Procedures for Master's Degrees 

1. Letter of inquiry from prospective student to Graduate School or department 
head. 

2. Mailing of proper forms to student. 

3. Receipt of application materials and required fee by Graduate School. 

4. Referral of application materials to department for review and recommenda- 
tion. 

5. Department forwards recommendation regarding applicant's admissibility to 
Graduate Dean. 

6. The department's recommendation is reviewed and the student is notified of 
the action taken on the request for admission. 

7. Student arrives, reports to the department, is assigned an adviser and makes 
out a roster of courses in consultation with the departmental adviser. 

8. Advisory committee of three or more graduate faculty members, one of whom 
represents the supporting field, appointed by the Graduate Dean upon the 
recommendation of the department head. 

9. Plan of Work prepared by the advisory committee with the student and sub- 
mitted in quadruplicate to the department head and the Graduate School for 
approval prior to completion of one-half of the proposed program. 

10. Three copies of the approved Plan of Work returned to the department. One 
copy is kept in department files, one is returned to the committee chairman 
and one is given to the student. 

11. Student passes language examination (if required by the major department). 

12. Written examination in the major and/or supporting fields may be required of 
the candidate. If required, written examinations must be successfully com- 
pleted prior to requesting the comprehensive oral examination. 

13. A copy of a preliminary draft of the thesis is submitted to the chairman of the 



*The following programs in the School of Education offer courses of study leading to the Master of Education degree: 
adult and community college education, agricultural education, curriculum and instruction, educational administration and 
supervision, guidance and personnel services, industrial arts education, mathematics education, occupational education, 
science education, special education and vocational industrial education. 
"Off-campus only. 
***No new applications for these degrees are being accepted. Students interested in these areas should contact the ap- 
propriate School dean. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 45 

student's advisory committee for review. (Thesis degrees only). 

14. At least two weeks prior to the final oral examination, the chairman of the stu- 
dent's advisory committee submits the thesis to advisory committee members 
for review. (Thesis degrees only). 

15. The final oral examination may be scheduled when all other requirements, ex- 
cept completion of the course work for the final semester, are satisfied. Permis- 
sion for the candidate to take the final oral examination is requested of the 
Graduate School at least two weeks before the examination and, in the case of 
thesis degrees, must be accompanied by a certification that the thesis is com- 
plete except for such revisions as may be necessary as a result of the final ex- 
amination. 

16. The Graduate Dean schedules the examination and notifies the student and ad- 
visory committee of the time and place. The report on the final examination 
should be filed with the Graduate School as soon as the examination has been 
completed. 

17. Three copies of the thesis signed by each member of the student's advisory 
committee must be submitted to the Graduate School at least four weeks 
before the end of the semester or summer session in which the degree is to be 
conferred. (Thesis degrees only). 

18. The thesis is reviewed by the Graduate School to insure that the format con- 
forms with the specifications prescribed in the Guide for the Preparation of 
Theses. (Thesis degrees only). 

19. All degree requirements must be completed within six calendar years, beginn- 
ing with the date the student commences courses carrying graduate credit ap- 
plicable to the degree program, unless a more restrictive time limit has been es- 
tablished by the academic school. 

20. Student must be registered in semester or session in which degree is to be 
awarded unless all requirements for the degree have been completed by the 
first day of classes in the term in which the degree is to be awarded. 

Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education Degrees 

The doctorate symbolizes the ability of the recipient to undertake original 
research and scholarly work at the highest levels without supervision. The degree 
is therefore not granted simply upon the completion of a stated amount of course 
work but rather upon demonstration by the student of a comprehensive knowledge 
and high attainment in scholarship in a specialized field of study. The student must 
demonstrate this ability by writing a dissertation reporting the results of an 
original investigation and by passing a series of comprehensive examinations in the 
field of specialization and related areas of knowledge. 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is offered in the following fields of study: 

Animal Science Biomathematics 

Applied Mathematics Botany 

Biochemistry Chemical Engineering 

Biological and Agricultural Chemistry 

Engineering Civil Engineering 



46 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Crop Science Mechanical Engineering 

Economics Microbiology 

Electrical Engineering Nuclear Engineering 

Engineering Science and Mechanics* Nutrition 

Entomology Operations Research 

Fiber and Polymer Science Physics 

Food Science Physiology 

Forestry Plant Pathology 

Genetics Psychology 

Horticultural Science Science Education 

Industrial Engineering Sociology 

Marine Sciences Soil Science 

Materials Engineering Statistics 

Mathematics Wood and Paper Science 

Mathematics Education Zoology 

The Doctor of Education degree is offered in the following fields: 

Adult and Community College Education Guidance and Personnel Services 

Curriculum and Instruction Industrial Arts Education 

Educational Administration and Supervision Occupational Education 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE AND PLAN OF GRADUATE WORK 

An advisory committee of at least four graduate faculty members will be appoin- 
ted by the Dean of the Graduate School upon the recommendation of the head of 
the major department. The committee which must include at least one represen- 
tative of the minor field will, with the student, prepare a Plan of Graduate Work 
which must be approved by the department head and the Graduate School. In addi- 
tion to the course work to be undertaken, the subject of the student's dissertation 
must appear on the plan; and any subsequent changes in subject or in the overall 
plan must be submitted for approval. 

The program of work must be unified, and all constituent parts must contribute 
to an organized program of study and research. Courses must be selected from 
groups embracing one principal subject of concentration, the major, and from a 
cognate field, the minor. Normally, a student will select the minor work from a 
single discipline or field which, in the judgment of the advisory committee, 
provides relevant support to the major field. However, when the advisory commit- 
tee finds that the needs of the student will best be served by work in an inter- 
disciplinary minor, it has the alternative of developing a special program in lieu of 
the usual minor. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT 

For the Doctor of Philosophy and the Doctor of Education, the student is expec- 
ted to be registered for graduate work at an accredited Graduate School for at least 



•No new applications being accepted. Students interested in this area should contact the Dean of the School of 
Engineering. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 47 

six semesters beyond the baccalaureate degree. 

At least two residence credits, as defined below, must be secured in continuous 
residence (registration in consecutive semesters) as a graduate student at the Un- 
iversity. Failure to take work during the summer does not break continuity; 
however, summer work may be used in partial fulfillment of this requirement. 

Residence credit is determined by the number of semester hours of graduate 
work carried during a given term. During a regular semester, residence credit is 
calculated in the following manner: 

Semester Credits (Hours) Residence Credits 
9 or more 1 

6-8 2/3 

less than 6 (including registration 1/3 

for "Thesis Preparation") 

The residence credit for a six-week summer term is equal to one half of the 
corresponding amount for a regular semester. For example, six semester hours 
carried during a summer session will earn one third of a residence credit; less than 
six credit hours will earn one sixth of a residence credit. 

GRADING AND ACADEMIC STANDING 

The grading system and grade requirements for all doctoral programs are the 
same as those for master's degree programs, as described on page 41. 

LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS 

A reading knowledge of at least one modern foreign language is required by some 
departments for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. The programs in chemistry and 
mathematics require a reading knowledge of two foreign languages or a com- 
prehension in depth of one. For the Doctor of Education degree, the decision as to 
whether or not there will be a language requirement is left to the student's ad- 
visory committee. 

Students who choose to demonstrate a reading knowledge of a language may 
select from any of the Romance, Germanic, or Slavic languages (or any combina- 
tion in those programs requiring two languages). The Department of Foreign 
Languages and Literatures offers courses in French, German and Spanish es- 
pecially designed for graduate students who have no previous knowledge of a 
foreign language or who wish to refresh their knowledge of a language. These 
courses concentrate exclusively on teaching students to understand the written 
word and do not provide instruction or testing in speaking and original composi- 
tion. A passing grade on the final examination in one of these courses is sufficient 
evidence of a reading knowledge of the language. 

To demonstrate comprehension in depth of one language, a student must not 
only prove that one possesses a reading knowledge of the language but also that he 
or she is proficient in the oral and compositional elements of that language. Stu- 
dents desiring to master one language in depth should consult the head of the 
Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures concerning the specific courses 
which will be necessary to achieve this comprehension; specific arrangements will 



48 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

depend upon the student's background in the language. 

Students whose native language is other than English may use English as one of 
the languages when two are required for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. When 
English is submitted in partial fulfillment of the dual language requirement, the 
native language may not be used as the other language. 

When only one language is required in the student's program, certification for 
that language must occur on this campus. 

PRELIMINARY COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

After completing the language requirement but not earlier than the end of the 
second year of graduate study and not later than one semester (four months) before 
the final oral examination, each doctoral student is required to take a preliminary 
comprehensive examination. The examination consists of two parts: written ex- 
aminations and an oral examination. Requirements for written examinations in 
the minor field are left to the discretion of the department in which the student is 
minoring. 

The written portion may be conducted in one of two ways. In the first, each mem- 
ber of the advisory committee prepares a set of questions for the student's 
response, and answers to each set are returned to the appropriate member for 
grading. This procedure is used by departments which have a relatively small num- 
ber of doctoral students. 

Many of the larger departments have developed departmental written examina- 
tions to be used for all students. These examinations are given several times during 
the year, and scheduled dates are announced well in advance. Where written 
departmental examinations of this kind are used, the student will be expected to 
make arrangements to take these examinations. 

Regardless of the method employed, the questions involved may cover any phase 
of the course work taken by the student during graduate study or any subject 
logically related to an understanding of the subject matter in the major and minor 
areas of study. The questions are designed to measure the student's mastery of the 
subject matter and the adequacy of preparation for research. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the written portion of the preliminary examina- 
tion, authorization for the preliminary oral examination is requested from the 
Graduate School. This examination is conducted by the student's advisory commit- 
tee and a representative from the Graduate School and is open to all graduate 
faculty members. The student and the examining committee will be notified by the 
Graduate School of the arranged time and place. The oral examination is designed 
to test the student's ability to relate factual knowledge to specific circumstances, to 
use this knowledge with accuracy and promptness and to demonstrate a com- 
prehensive understanding of the field of specialization and related areas. 

A unanimous vote of approval by the members of the advisory committee is re- 
quired for the student to pass the preliminary oral examination. Approval may be 
conditioned, however, on the successful completion of additional work in some par- 
ticular field(s). All committee actions may be appealed by written application to 
the Graduate Dean. 

Failure to pass the preliminary examination terminates the student's work at 
this institution unless the examining committee recommends a reexamination. No 
reexamination may be given until at least one full semester has elapsed, and only 
one reexamination is permitted. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 49 

CANDIDACY 

A doctoral student is admitted to candidacy upon passing the preliminary ex- 
amination without conditions or after fulfilling any conditions specified by the ad- 
visory committee. 

FINAL ORAL EXAMINATION 

The final oral examination is scheduled after the dissertation is complete except 
for such revisions as may be necessary as a result of the examination, but not 
earlier than one semester or its equivalent after admission to candidacy. The ex- 
amination consists of the candidate's defense of the methodology used and the con- 
clusions reached in the research, as reported in the dissertation. It is conducted by 
an examining committee, which consists of the student's advisory committee and a 
Graduate School representative. This examination is open to the University com- 
munity. 

A unanimous vote of approval of the advisory committee is required for passing 
the final oral examination; failure of a student to pass the examination terminates 
one's work at this institution unless the advisory committee recommends a reex- 
amination. No reexamination may be given until at least one full semester has 
elapsed; only one reexamination is permitted. 

THE DISSERTATION 

The doctoral dissertation presents the results of the student's original investiga- 
tion in the field of major interest. It must represent a contribution to knowledge, be 
adequately supported by data and be written in a manner consistent with the 
highest standards of scholarship. Publication is expected. 

The dissertation will be reviewed by all members of the advisory committee and 
must receive their approval prior to submission to the Graduate School. Two copies 
of the document signed by all members of the student's advisory committee must 
be submitted to the Graduate School not later than four weeks before the date on 
which the degree is to be conferred. Prior to final approval, the dissertation will be 
reviewed by the Graduate School to insure that the format conforms to the 
specifications prescribed in the Guide for the Preparation of Theses. Detailed infor- 
mation on form and organization of the dissertation is presented in the Univer- 
sity's Guide for the Preparation of Theses which is available in the Graduate 
School office. 

The University has a requirement that all doctoral dissertations be microfilmed 
by University Microfilms International, of Ann Arbor, Michigan which includes 
publication of the abstract in Dissertation Abstracts. The student is required to 
pay for the microfilming service. (See "Special Registration and Fees" under "Tui- 
tion and Fees," page 30.) 

TIME LIMIT 

The student must complete all requirements for the doctorate within seven 
calendar years from the date of admission to candidacy unless a more restrictive 
time limit has been established by the academic school. 



50 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Summary of Procedures for the Doctor of Philosophy and 
Doctor of Education Degrees 

1. Letter of inquiry from prospective student to Graduate School or department 
head. 

2. Mailing of proper forms to student. 

3. Receipt of application materials and required fee by Graduate School. 

4. Referral of application materials to department for review and recommenda- 
tion. 

5. Department forwards recommendation regarding applicant's admissibility to 
Graduate Dean. 

6. The department's recommendation is reviewed and the student is notified of 
the action taken on the request for admission. 

7. Student arrives, reports to the department, is assigned an adviser and makes 
out a roster of courses in consultation with the departmental adviser. 

8. Advisory committee of at least four graduate faculty members, one of whom 
represents the minor field, appointed by the Graduate Dean upon the recom- 
mendation of the department head. 

9. A dissertation subject is selected and an outline of the proposed research sub- 
mitted to the student's advisory committee and the department head for 
review and approval. 

10. Plan of Work prepared by the advisory committee with the student and sub- 
mitted in quadruplicate to the department head and the Graduate School for 
approval as soon as feasible after completion of 12 hours of course work. 

11. Three copies of the approved Plan of Work returned to the department. One 
copy is kept in department files, one is returned to the committee chairman 
and one is given to the student. 

12. Student passes language examination(s). (See pages 47-48.) 

13. Written examinations in the major and minor fields may be scheduled no 
earlier than the end of the second year of graduate study and not later than one 
semester before the final oral examination. The results of these examinations 
will be reported to the Graduate School. 

14. When all written examinations have been completed satisfactorily, the chair- 
man requests the scheduling of the preliminary oral examination at least two 
weeks prior to the suggested date. Upon approval of the request, a graduate 
faculty member is selected to represent the Graduate School at the examina- 
tion and the student and examining committee are notified of the time and 
place. The report of the examination is sent to the Graduate School and if the 
examination has been passed without conditions, the student is admitted to 
candidacy. 

15. A copy of the preliminary draft of the dissertation is submitted to the chair- 
man of the student's advisory committee for review. 

16. At least two weeks prior to the final oral examination, the chairman of the stu- 
dent's advisory committee submits the dissertation to advisory committee 
members for review. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 51 

17. One semester after admission to candidacy or later, permission for the can- 
didate to take the final oral examination is requested of the Graduate School by 
the chairman of the candidate's advisory committee. Requests should be filed 
at least two weeks before the date of the examination and must be accompanied 
by a certification that the dissertation is complete except for such revisions as 
may be necessary as a result of the final examination. Upon approval of the re- 
quest, the student and the examining committee, including a Graduate School 
representative, are notified of the time and place of the examination. The 
Graduate School Representative receives a copy of the dissertation at least one 
week prior to the examination. 

18. Two copies of the dissertation signed by each member of the student's advisory 
committee and five copies of the abstract must be submitted to the Graduate 
School at least four weeks before the end of the semester or summer session in 
which the degree is to be conferred. Two copies of the University Microfilms 
Agreement and two copies of the Survey of Earned Doctorates forms are sub- 
mitted with the dissertation. 

19. The dissertation is reviewed by the Graduate School to insure that the format 
conforms with the specifications prescribed in the Guide for the Preparation of 
Theses. 

20. All degree requirements must be completed within seven calendar years from 
date of admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree unless a more restrictive 
time limit has been established by the academic school. 

21. The student must be registered in the term in which the degree is to be awar- 
ded unless all requirements for the degree, including submission of the disser- 
tation to the Graduate School, have been completed by the first day of classes 
in the term in which the degree is to be awarded. 




FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION 



The course descriptions are planned for the academic years 1978-1979 and 1979- 
1980, unless indicated otherwise. Some listed courses may not be taught, however, 
if registration for a course is insufficient, or if faculty or facilities are not available. 

In a typical course description, the semester hours of credit, the number of actual 
lecture and laboratory hours of meeting per week, and the term or terms in which 
the course is offered are shown in this manner: 2(1-2) F,S,Sum. or 1-3 F,S,Sum. 

In the first example, the 2 indicates the number of semester hours credit given 
for satisfactory completion of the course. The (1-2) indicates that the course meets 
for one hour of lecture and two hours of laboratory work each week. In the second 
example, the 1-3 indicates that a maximum of three and a minimum of one 
semester hours credit can be earned. This is to be arranged with the instructor. The 
F designates that the course is to be given in the fall semester. Likewise, the S 
designates spring and the Sum., summer. 

Abbreviations used in the course descriptions are: CI, consent of instructor; 
grad., graduate; undergrad., undergraduate; sr., senior; jr., junior; preq., prere- 
quisite; coreq., corequisite; lab., laboratory; lect., lecture; and alt. years, alternate 
years. 

For 400-level course descriptions, see the Undergraduate Catalog. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 53 

Adult and Community College Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor E. J. Boone, Head 

Professors: M. P. Burt, W. L. Carpenter, M. S. Knowles, R. W. Shearon, C. Trent; 
Extension Professor: J. D. George; Adjunct Professors: B. E. Fountain, I. E. 
Ready; Associate Professors: J. C. Glass, W. L. Gragg, Joan W. Wright; Visiting 
Associate Professor: Estelle E. White; Assistant Professors: J. L. Compton, K. B. 
Segner III; Extension Assistant Professors: L. F. Hawkins, D. R. Proctor. 

The department is a component of both the School of Education and the School of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences. It offers programs of study leading to the Master of 
Education, Master of Science and Doctor of Education degrees with a major in 
adult and community college education. The program is directed toward ad- 
ministrators, supervisors and teachers in university and cooperative extension and 
community colleges and other adult education agencies. 

The department curriculum is interdisciplinary. It is specifically designed to help 
students acquire an integrated conceptual and theoretical framework derived from 
the behavioral and social sciences and education that will equip them to plan, ad- 
minister and effect viable and relevant programs of change with individual learn- 
ers, groups and larger societal aggregates in both formal and informal settings. 

Further, the curriculum provides opportunities for students to acquire a high 
level of competence in identifying and diagnosing problematic situations and in 
proposing alternative courses of action and strategies in seeking solutions to 
problems. Cognate fields of study include anthropology, economics, politics, psy- 
chology and sociology. 

The department is housed in Ricks Hall and Poe Hall. Graduate students on 
assistantships and internships are provided office space and equipment. Other 
graduate students are provided study space when possible. 

For descriptions of the adult and community college education courses listed 
below, see pages 117-129. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 500 The Community College System. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED (SOC) 501 Leadership. 3(3-0) F,S. (See sociology, page 237.) 

ED 503 The Programming Process in Adult and Community College Education. 3(3-0) 

F,S. 

ED 510 Adult Education: History, Philosophy, Contemporary Nature. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED (SOC) 513 Community Organization. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 537 The Extension and Public Service Function in Higher Education. 3(3-0) S,Sum. 



54 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ED 538 Instructional Strategies in Adult and Community College Education. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 539 Educational Gerontology. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 541 Community Education. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 559 Learning Concepts and Theories Applied to Adult and Community College 
Education. 3(3-0) S.Sum. 

ED 567 Concepts and Strategies of Understanding, Motivating and Teaching Disad- 
vantaged Adults. 3(3-0) S,Sum. 

ED 5% Topical Problems in Adult and Community College Education. Credits 
Arranged. F,S,Sum. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 600 Organizational Concepts and Theories Applied to Adult and Community 
College Education. 3(3-0) F.Sum. 

ED 601 Administrative Concepts and Theories Applied to Adult and Community 
College Education. 3(3-0) S.Sum. 

ED 696 Seminar in Adult and Community College Education. 1-3. F,S. 

Agricultural Education 

For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see education 
page 105. 



Air Conservation 

The air conservation faculty includes some 50 faculty members representing 20 
departments in four schools. It is the intent of this faculty and the associated 
program to provide training for students in the many disciplines related to air con- 
servation. Such areas as air sampling, biological effects, air quality management, 
sources, meteorology, law and economics and business are all important aspects 
covered by course offerings and research projects. 

A graduate student desiring to minor in air conservation will have on his or her 
committee a member of the air conservation faculty from outside the individual's 
major department, representing this minor field. While there are no restrictions on 
the major, students minoring in air conservation should have a strong background 
in the life sciences, the physical sciences or engineering. The minor program will 
normally consist of 9 or more credits for the master's degree, 15 or more for the 
doctorate. 

A variety of courses bearing on different aspects of the air conservation problem 
may be taken on this campus, at UNC-Chapel Hill or Duke. The listing below shows 
relevant courses available at North Carolina State University. For courses at Duke 
and Chapel Hill see the appropriate catalogs. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 55 

Air Pollutants and Their Sources 

CE 576 Atmospheric Pollution. 

Meteorology and Pollutant Transport 

MY 512 Micrometeorology. 

MY 555 Meteorology of the Biosphere. 

MY 556 Air Pollution Meteorology. 

MY 627 Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion. 

Air Sampling and Analysis 

ST 511 Experimental Statistics for Biological Sciences I. 
CH 517 Physical Methods of Elemental Trace Analysis. 

Effects on Human, Animal, and Plant Receptors 

BO 480 Air Pollution Biology. 

ZO 400 Biological Basis of Man's Environment. 

BO 561 Physiological Ecology. 

FOR 353 Air Photo Interpretation. 

TOX 515 Environmental Toxicology. 

Air Quality Management 

CE 472 Elements of Air Quality Management. 
CHE 535 Engineering Economy in Air Pollution Control Systems. 
MAE 409 Particulate Control in Industrial Atmospheric Pollution. 
MAE 570 Theory of Particulate Collection in Air Pollution Control. 
WPS 525 Pollution Abatement in Forest Products Industries. 

Air Quality Law and Institutions 

PS (ED) 502 Public Administration. 

UNI 495 Special Topics in University Studies (Environment and Law). 

Air Conservation Economics 

EB 401 Economic Analysis for Non-Majors. 

EB 515 Water Resources Economics. 

EB 550 Mathematical Models in Economics. 

OR 501 Introduction to Operations Research. 

Communications concerning the air conservation program, including inquiries 
from students wishing to minor in air conservation, should be directed to the 
Chairman, Air Conservation Faculty, Department of Chemical Engineering, 113 
Riddick, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607. 



56 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Animal Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor C. A. Lassiter, Head 

Professors: E. R. Barrick, R. F. Behlow, A. J. Clawson, D. G. Davenport, E. J. 
Eisen, L. Goode, R. W. Harvey, G. Hyatt Jr., E. E. Jones, J. R. Jones, J. M. 
Leatherwood, J. G. Lecce, J. E. Legates, B. T. McDaniel, R. D. Mochrie, R. M. 
Myers, I. D. Porterfield, A. H. Rakes, H. A. Ramsey, 0. W. Robison, F. D. 
Sargent, H. A. Schneider, L. C. Ulberg; Professors Emeriti: F. H. Smith, H. A. 
Stewart, G. H. Wise; Associate Professors: J. H. Britt, E. V. Caruolo, E. U. 
Dillard, B. H. Johnson, W. L. Johnson, J. J. McNeill, J. C. Wilk; Assistant 
Professors: W. D. Armstrong, K. R. Butcher 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: E. G. Batte, C. H. Hill, D. J. Moncol, S. B. Tove 

The Department of Animal Science offers programs of graduate study leading to 
the Master of Agriculture, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 
Animal science offers an opportunity for training in a diversity of basic sciences 
and the integration of such knowledge into the framework of a living system. Stu- 
dents may major not only in animal science but also in any one of the following dis- 
ciplines: biochemistry, genetics, microbiology, nutrition and physiology. Animal 
science majors may specialize in one or more of the basic disciplines or in the more 
applied areas of management and production. The animal science major also 
provides for the student who prefers a multidisciplinary approach. Majors in a 
basic discipline are not only trained in that discipline but have the added capability 
of integrating such knowledge into a living system; i.e., the domestic animal. 
Minors can be obtained in any of the disciplines listed above or in a variety of other 
areas. 

Modern laboratories, specialized equipment and many different species of 
animals are available as research tools. A program of course work and a research 
project are developed for each student in accord with one's educational objectives. 
The primary goal is to provide the student with a challenging opportunity to 
develop his or her creative ability so that one may contribute significantly to a 
chosen discipline. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 
ANS 401 Reproductive Physiology. Preq.: ZO 421. 3(2-3) S. 
ANS 402 Beef Cattle Management. Preq.: ANS 204. 3(2-3) S. 
ANS 403 Swine Management. Preq.: ANS 204. 3(2-3) F. 
ANS 404 Dairy Cattle Management. Preq.: ANS 204. 3(2-3) S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 57 

ANS 405 Lactation. Preq.: ZO 421. 3(2-3) F. 

ANS 406 Sheep Management. Preq.: ANS 204. 3(2-3) F. 

ANS 410 Horse Management. 3(2-2) F. 

ANS 411 Breeding and Improvement of Domestic Animals. Preq.: GN 411. 3(2-2) F. 

ANS (PO, NTR) 415 Comparative Nutrition. Preq.: CH 220 or 221. 3(3-0) F. 

ANS (NTR) 416 Quantitative Nutrition. Preq.: BCH 351. 3(1-6) S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ANS (PHY) 502 Reproductive Physiology of Vertebrates. Preq.: ZO 421 or CI. 3(3-0) S. 
Emphasis will be placed on discussions of mechanisms which control the reproductive 
processes. Mechanisms which are species limited will be compared with those which are 
shared by all species. Current knowledge of some subsystems will be investigated in detail 
while others will be referred to in reviews of well-documented research findings. 

Ulberg 

ANS (GN) 508 Genetics of Animal Improvement. Preqs.: GN 411, ST 511. 3(3-0) S. 
Emphasis is placed on the utilization of basic principles of population and quantitative 
genetics in animal improvement. Factors affecting genie and genotypic frequencies and. 
methods of estimating genetic and nongenetic variance, heritabilities and breeding values 
are presented. The roles of mating systems and selection procedures in producing superior 
genetic populations are examined. Robison 

ANS 510 Advanced Livestock Management. Preq.: ANS 402 or ANS 403 or ANS 404. 3(3- 
0) S. An advanced study of beef cattle, dairy cattle and swine management practices with 
particular emphasis on input-output relationships and the consequences of alternative 
management decisions. Problem. (Offered in even-numbered years.) Davenport 

ANS 520 Tropical Livestock Production. Preq.: Six hours of ANS at 400-level or CI. 3(3- 
0) S. Modern principles of feeding, genetics, forage production and management are applied 
to improvement of meat and dairy animals in tropical, subtropical and high-altitude environ- 
ments. Considers biological and socio-economic constraints to development of livestock in- 
dustry. Discussion of climatic effects on production applies to U. S. conditions and to 
developing tropical countries. W. L. Johnson 

ANS (PHY) 580 Mammalian Endocrine Physiology. Preqs.: BCH 351, ZO 421. 3(3-0) F. 
Detailed discussion of the mammalian endocrine system with emphasis on the functional 
aspect, chemistry, and mode of action of specific hormones secreted from major endocrine 
glands. Modern biochemical and physiological principles of hormonal integrations and 
neuroendocrine integration are examined. B. H. Johnson 

ANS 590 Topical Problems in Animal Science. Maximum 6 F,S. Special problems may 
be selected or assigned in various phases of animal science. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ANS (GN) 603 Population Genetics in Animal Improvement. Preqs.: ST 512, GN 506. 
3(3-0) F. A study of the forces influencing gene frequencies, inbreeding and its effects, and 
alternative breeding plans. Eisen 

ANS (PHY) 604 Experimental Animal Physiology. Preq.: ZO (PHY) 513 or equivalent. 
4(2-4) F. A study of the theories and techniques involved in the use of animals in 



58 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

physiological investigation with special emphasis on the diversity of physiological applica- 
tions on this campus. Caruolo 

ANS 690 Seminar in Animal Nutrition. Preq.: Consent of seminar leaders. 1(1-0) F,S. 
Orientation in philosophy of research, preparation for research and general research 
methodology. Graduate Staff 

ANS 699 Research in Animal Science. Credits Arranged. F,S. A maximum of six hours is 
allowed toward the master's degree; no limitation on credits in doctorate program. 

Graduate Staff 

For related courses, see: 
BHC 551 General Biochemistry. 3(3-0) F. 
MB 551 Immunology and Serology. 3(2-2) S. 
NTR 608 Energy Metabolism. 3(3-0) F. 



Anthropology 

For anthropology courses, see sociology and anthropology, page 237. 

Architecture 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. Loss, Program Director 

Professors: G. L. Bireline Jr., R. P. Burns Jr., J. H. Cox, C. E. McKinney, H. Sanoff, 
V. F. Shogren, D. Stuart; Professors Emeriti: H. H. Harris, H. L. Kamphoefner; 
Associate Professors: P. Batchelor, R. H. Clark, G. J. P. Reuer, W. Taylor; 
Assistant Professors: D. W. Barnes Jr., S. Kanda, M. Pause, P. Rand, M. C. 
Romanach, J. Tector, P. Tesar 

This program's objectives are based on the belief that the principles of architec- 
ture derive from the nature of man. Thus, the aesthetic, social and technical foun- 
dations of architecture must relate to the human condition and touch the spirit of 
man. 

The architecture program leads to the Master of Architecture degree. Graduate 
programs are designed: a) for the concluding two-year graduate-professional com- 
ponent to follow the four-year undergraduate Bachelor of Environmental Design 
and similar curriculum in a total six-year program, b) to follow the five-year un- 
dergraduate professional Bachelor of Architecture degree and c) for extended 
graduate study to follow undergraduate or graduate degrees in fields other than 
architecture or environmental design. 

The master's program is directed toward the development of independent study 
and research of high quality. The nature and complexity of the tasks which con- 
front the architect make it paramount that the master's program also be broadly 
based and diversified. There is potential for interdisciplinary study within urban 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 59 

design, landscape architecture and product design. Curricula flexibility is provided 
so that each student can structure a program of study in accordance with expressed 
interests and demonstrated capabilities. Essentially, master's candidates are affor- 
ded concentrated education in depth so that they can prepare themselves for 
significant professional involvement in the environmental design field as prac- 
titioners, teachers, researchers, or in other more specialized areas. 

The studio/workshop provides an arena for graduate students to address both 
real-life, pragmatic problems as well as theoretical, philosophic issues, be they of 
immediate concern or of long range implication. Of special interest are those 
problems at the frontiers of the architectural profession, which have inherent 
potential for research, innovation and for the development of emergent roles for 
new professionals. In response to these objectives, the graduate program has 
developed the potential for an array of studio options. Examples include: architec- 
ture, urban design, urban architecture, building design and building systems, 
urban-community-neighborhood development, landscape architecture, product 
design and human engineering. These and other studio options are available as Un- 
iversity resources allow. The student normally selects these options with the advice 
of a faculty advisory committee. The student also may call on other faculty exper- 
tise to support an individualized development program with the possibility of self- 
directed, independent studies during the final two semesters. 

The technical-professional courses — perception, man-environment, structures, 
industrialized systems, professional practice, research methods — are developed as 
multidiscipline courses within the School of Design and as specialized courses 
within the architecture program and are offered as "professional options." The 
University-wide complementary courses are any relevant complement to the stu- 
dent's program outside of the major field of study, such as sociology, psychology, 
urban affairs, environmental technology, political science, construction manage- 
ment, business and administration, and many others singly or in combination. 

The program requires of all students undertaking the normal two-year master's 
program a minimum of 48 credit hours of course work: 24 credit hours of work will 
be in studio/workshops; 12 credit hours, in professional options; and 12 credit 
hours, in complementary University-wide courses. The program for graduates of a 
professional Bachelor of Architecture program requires a minimum of 30 credit 
hours of course work: 12 in studio, 6 in independent projects, 6 in professional op- 
tion, and 6 in complementary courses. The program for those with degrees in fields 
other than architecture can be designed to build on previous experience. The prere- 
quisite "professional component" in the undergraduate program must be com- 
pleted prior to achieving full graduate status, after which the normal 48 credit- 
hour master's program is elected. A period of 3V2 to 4 years in residence is normally 
required for students with degrees in fields other than architecture. 

In addition to the usual University application procedures, a portfolio of design 
activity and interest is required. Those with degrees in fields other than architec- 
ture should not hesitate to apply and can indicate the nature and extent of related 
design activity and interests. 



60 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

ARC 400 Intermediate Architectural Design (Series). Preq.: DF 102. 6(0-9) F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ARC 511 Professional Practice I. Preq.: Fourth year standing. 2(2-0) F. The evolution of 
architecture as a modern practical profession; obligations of the profession to society and to 
itself; the legal and ethical position of the architect in practice; comparative study of docu- 
ments; the architect's working organization; emerging techniques of office practice. 

ARC 512 Professional Practice II. Preq.: Fourth year standing. 2(2-0) S. Continuing 
study of standard documents and emerging techniques of practice, with emphasis on the 
principles and improved techniques of writing construction specifications; interrelationship 
of The Contract Documents; comparative study of techniques for controlling competitive 
bidding. 

ARC 521, 522 Advanced Architectural Structures I, II. Preq.: (521) DN 352; (522) ARC 
521. 3(3-0) F,S. Gravity and non-gravity loads on structures; comparative behavior of struc- 
tural materials; comparative behavior of simple structural systems; approximate and exact 
analysis procedures as applied to systems; principles of approximate and exact design in tim- 
ber, steel and reinforced concrete; architectural/structural/mechanical compatibility in 
systems; basic principles of foundation analyses and design. 

ARC 531, 532 Advanced Building Technology I, II. Preqs.: DN 253, 254. 2(1-3) F,S. A 
synthesis of studies in building science undertaken in previous courses. Material assemblies 
in practical applications, dimensional characteristics of mechanical and construction 
systems for buildings, and special projects in selected areas of building science. 

ARC 542 Investigations in Recent World Architecture. Preq.: CI. 3(2-1) F. A lecture- 
seminar course intended to provide a description and analysis of recent developments in 
architectural design through an examination of projects by many of the world's most impor- 
tant architects. Primary emphasis will be placed on emerging design concepts and theories as 
expressed in the built architecture and the visionary proposals of the past two decades. 

ARC 551 Design Methods and Programming. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. The focus 
of this course is the exploration of concepts and techniques suitable for use in design 
problem-solving situations. One component of the course is devoted to a rationale for 
systematic inquiry and its link to creative problem solving. The second component will ex- 
amine various process models leading to the design program which has been described as 
first generation methodology. The final component of the course will examine program 
methods which extend design thinking toward over-participation techniques. 

ARC (LAR, PD) 571 Issues in Housing. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. This seminar in- 
tends to critically review the process of housing: the system and methods of production, 
management, and delivery; and most important to introduce the concept of the dweller as in- 
tegral to this process. The "housing process" then is effectively understood as requiring the 
active recognition and involvement of the user. 

ARC 581, 582 Conceptual Issues in Architecture and Design. Preq.: Grad. standing or 
advanced undergrad. 3(3-0) F.S. Fall semester— An examination and dialogue concerning 
current issues in American and Western society and their relation to the activities and goals 
of architects and designers. Spring semester— An investigation into issues and values 
currently held by participating students and their relation to an anticipated career in 
architecture and design. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 61 

ARC 591 Special Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F,S. Seminars on subjects of current 
interest in design which are presented by persons not part of the regular faculty. 

ARC 592 Special Topics. Preq.: Grad. standing. 2-3 F,S. Topics of current interest to the 
programs in the School of Design offered by faculty in the School. Subjects offered under 
this number are normally used to test and develop new courses. 

ARC 595 Independent Study. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F,S,Sum. Special problems in 
various aspects of design developed under the direction of a faculty member on a tutorial 
basis. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ARC 600 Advanced Architectural Design (Series). Preq.: 24 hours ARC 400 or 
equivalent. 6(0-12) F,S. Advanced studies in architectural design in which are investigated 
large-scale architectural problems having complex functional, social and economic implica- 
tions leading to a synthesizing of all previous design experience through in-depth investiga- 
tions of significant architectural environmental problems. Early emphasis is given to 
problem identification, program formulation and design application; consultation with plan- 
ners and environmental specialists is extensive. A final project is developed in the last 
semester. 

ARC 621, 622 Advanced Architectural Structures III, IV. Preq.: (621) ARC 522; (622) 
ARC 621. 2(1-3) F,S. Special projects in the study of complex structural systems: cable struc- 
tures, membranes, thin shells, folded plates, arches, vaults, space frames; studies of con- 
struction techniques, prefabrication, structural behavior and stress analysis through model 
work and simplified calculation procedures. 

ARC 691, 692 Special Topics in Architecture. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-6 F,S. An in- 
vestigation of special topics in architecture of particular interest to advanced students under 
the direction of a faculty member on a tutorial basis. Credits and content will vary with the 
needs of students. 



Biochemistry 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor S. B. Tove, Head 

Professors: F. B. Armstrong, H. R. Horton, J. S. Kahn, I. S. Longmuir, A. R. Main; 
Associate Professors: J. A. Knopp, E. C. Sisler, E. C. Theil; Assistant Professor: 
W. L. Miller 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: L. W. Aurand, J. Bordner, E. E. Jones, H. E. Swaisgood, W. P. 
Tucker 

The field of biochemistry applies and extends the concepts of chemistry and 
physics to the investigation of biological problems. The Department of 
Biochemistry offers courses of study leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees. 



62 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

A student entering graduate study in biochemistry should have a bachelor's 
degree in chemistry or in a biological science. The undergraduate program of study 
should have included a minimum of two semesters of organic chemistry, two 
semesters of physical chemistry, one semester of quantitative analytical chemistry 
and one semester of qualitative organic analysis. New students entering degree 
programs take placement examinations in organic and physical chemistry to deter- 
mine their level of competence in these areas. Students who lack undergraduate 
courses considered essential for graduate study in biochemistry may be admitted 
to the graduate program, provided the deficiencies are corrected early in their 
graduate work. 

Courses in general and experimental biochemistry and in intermediary 
metabolism are required as part of programs leading to advanced degrees in 
biochemistry. Other courses in biochemistry and related areas are required as 
recommended by the student's advisory committee. In addition, the student is ex- 
pected to participate regularly in seminars, gain teaching experience, and pass a 
specified number of short written examinations (cumulative examinations), which 
are given semi-monthly throughout the academic year. Completion of a thesis 
based on original research is required for both the Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees, and a reading knowledge of one foreign language is required 
for the doctoral degree. Research programs are currently being conducted in 
biochemical genetics, enzyme structures and mechanisms, biochemical aspects of 
toxicology, regulation of metabolism, fluorescence spectroscopy of proteins and 
nucleic acids, enzyme kinetics, photosynthesis and electron transport, developmen- 
tal biochemistry of plants, lipid metabolism, oxygen transport mechanisms, 
developmental changes in red blood cells and iron storage, X-ray crystallography, 
bio-oxidation of lipids and foods, immobilization of enzymes and coupled enzyme 
systems, synthesis of organo-sulfur compounds, and mechanisms of hormone 
action. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BCH 551 General Biochemistry. Preq.: Three years of chemistry including CH 223 or 
equivalent; CH 331 or 431 strongly recommended. 3(3-0) F. Principles of modern 
biochemistry including a study of structural and metabolic relationships of carbohydrates, 
lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, enzymes and metabolic regulation. Jones 

BCH 552 Experimental Biochemistry. Preqs.: CH 223; CH 315 recommended; Preq. or 
Coreq.: BCH 551. 3(1-6) F. An introduction to fundamental techniques of biochemistry and 
molecular biology involving experimental study of carbohydrates, proteins, enzymes, nucleic 
acids, lipids, and metabolism. Theil 

BCH (PHY) 553 Physiological Biochemistry. Preq.: BCH 551. 3(3-0) S. Application of 
biochemical methods to the elucidation of the function of whole organisms. A. Biochemistry 
of 1) blood, 2) water, electrolyte, acid-base balance, 3) renal function, 4) muscle metabolism, 
5) central nervous system, 6) autonomic nervous system, 7) endocrine system. B. 
Biochemistry of adaptation to environment 1) high and low Po.,, 2) hot and cold, 3) wet and 
dry, 4) pollution. Longmuir 

BCH 554 Radioisotope Techniques in Biology. Preq.: BCH 351 or CI. 2(1-3) S.Sum. 
Theory and application of radioisotope techniques used in biology. The different modes of 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 63 

radioactivity are correlated with methods of measurement. Emphasis on use and limitations 
of various instruments and techniques and on their application to research problems. 

Sisler 

BCH 557 Introductory Enzyme Kinetics. Preqs.: BCH 551 and MA 201 or 212. 3(3-0) F. 
Basic principles of chemical kinetics are applied to develop enzyme kinetics. Limitations of 
the Michaelis equation are considered in light of the general rate equation. Transient state 
kinetics are then considered. Inhibition and activation, pH functions, effects of temperature, 
and elucidation of mechanisms follow. The kinetics of allosteric site interactions and of con- 
formational forms complete the course. Main 

BCH (GN, MB) 561 Biochemical and Microbial Genetics. Preqs.: BCH 351 or 551, GN 
411 or 505, MB 401 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. A study of the development of the fields of 
biochemical genetics and microbial genetics, emphasizing both techniques and concepts 
currently used in research in these areas. Includes lectures and discussions of current 
research publications. Armstrong 

BCH 590 Special Topics in Biochemistry. Preq.: BCH 351 or equivalent. Credits 
Arranged, Maximum 3 F,S,Sum. The study of topics of special interest by small groups of 
students instructed by members of the faculty. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BCH 651 Physical Biochemistry. Preq.: BCH 551. 3(3-0) F. Structural and physical 
properties of biological macromolecules and the application of physical methods to their 
study. Knopp 

BCH 652 Biochemical Research Techniques. Coreq.: BCH 651 or CI. 1-3 S. Laboratory 
experiments involving the chemical, hydrodynamic, and spectroscopic properties of 
biological macromolecules. Swaisgood 

BCH 655 Intermediary Metabolism I. Preq.: BCH 551. 3(3-0) S. Lectures covering en- 
zyme kinetics, membrane structure and function, control of enzymatic reactions, energy 
metabolism, and the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. Tove 

BCH 657 Intermediary Metabolism II. Preq.: BCH 551. 3(3-0) F. Enzyme mechanisms, 
metabolism of proteins, nucleic acids and their constituents, and metabolic controls. 

Horton 

BCH (CH) 659 Natural Products. 3(3-0) F. (See chemistry, page 76.) 

BCH 691 Seminar in Biochemistry. 1(1-0) F,S. Graduate Staff 

BCH 695 Special Topics in Biochemistry. Preq.: Grad. standing in BCH. Credits 
Arranged. F,S,Sum. Critical study of special problems and selected topics of current interest 
in biochemistry and related fields. Graduate Staff 

BCH 699 Biochemical Research. Credits Arranged, F, S, Sum. Graduate Staff 



64 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor F. J. Hassler, Head 

Professors: H. D. Bowen, J. W. Dickens (USDA), B. K. Huang, E. G. Humphries, 
W. H. Johnson, G. J. Kirz, W. F. McClure, C. W. Suggs, T. B. Whitaker (USDA), 
E. H. Wiser, J. H. Young; Professor Emeritus: D. H. Howells; Associate 
Professors: G. R. Baughman, F. J. Humenik, M. R. Overcash, R. P. Rohrbach, R. 
W. Skaggs, R. S. Sowell; Extension Associate Professor: R. E. Sneed; Assistant 
Professors: C. F. Abrams, P. W. Westerman, D. H. Willits; Extension Assistant 
Professor: J. C. Barker; Adjunct Assistant Professor: L. S. Rosenstein; Research 
Associate: S. C. Mohapatra 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: D. D. Hamann, V. A. Jones; Associate Professor: A. E. Hassan 

The Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering offers programs of 
study for the Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Biological and 
Agricultural Engineering degrees. 

In the Master of Science program emphasis is placed on mathematics and theory 
as the unifying link between otherwise divergent fields of knowledge in the 
biological and physical sciences, and as prerequisites to effective engineering ad- 
vances in biological and agricultural areas. As the student acquires competence in 
the advanced methods of science, he or she applies knowledge by conducting an 
original research investigation and by writing and defending a thesis. 

Study for the Doctor of Philosophy degree builds on the Master of Science 
program with additional formal study followed by a period of independent disser- 
tation research. 

Current departmental research projects available for graduate student par- 
ticipation include: animal waste treatment and recycling systems, instrumentation 
to measure quality and composition of agricultural commodities, mechanization of 
field and horticultural crops (tobacco, sweet potatoes, cucumbers, blueberries, 
grapes, environmental plants, floral crops, and greenhouse vegetables), peanut and 
tobacco processing, drainage and water table control systems, hydrologic models 
for agriculture, poultry production systems, occupational safety and health in 
agriculture, and production systems for cotton, soybeans, tobacco, sweet potatoes, 
peanuts, and floral crops. 

For those interested primarily in a broadened background of engineering science 
and technology— without the thesis requirement — the Master of Biological and 
Agricultural Engineering program permits a wide selection from a variety of ad- 
vanced courses. While this program is primarily for those intending to terminate 
graduate study at the master's level, a student may, with departmental approval, 
develop a plan of study under this program which leads to study for the doctorate. 

Graduate students have access to modern well-equipped research laboratories, 
controlled environment test chambers, excellent computing facilities and a 
research shop manned by competent mechanics. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 65 

Information concerning fellowships and assistantships may be obtained from the 
department head. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

BAE 411 Farm Power & Machinery. Preqs.: BAE 211, PY 211 or 221. 3(2-3) S. 

BAE (FS) 432 Food Engineering II. Preq.: FS(BAE) 331. 3(2-3) S. 

BAE 433 Processing Agricultural Products. Preq.: PY 212. 4(3-3) S. 

BAE 461 Analysis of Agricultural Systems. Preqs.: MA 114 or 112, EB 212. 3(2-2) F. 

BAE 462 Functional Design of Field Machines. Preqs.: BAE 361 or equivalent, SSC 200. 
3(2-3) S. 

BAE 465 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering. Preqs.: MA 202 or 212, PY 212 or 221. 
3(3-0) S. 

BAE (SSC) 471 Agricultural Water Management. Preqs.: BS 100, SSC 200. 4(3-2) F. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BAE 552 Instrumentation for Agricultural Research and Processing. Preqs.: EE 331, 
MA 301. 2(1-3) Alt. F. Theory and application of primary sensing elements and transducers. 
Generalized performance characteristics and the use of standards. Use of specialized 
measurement systems for agricultural research and processing including an introduction to 
correlation and power spectral density measurements. McClure 

BAE (CE, MB) 570 Sanitary Microbiology. 3(2-3) S. (See civil engineering, page 80.) 

BAE (CE) 578 Agricultural Waste Management. Preq.: Grad. or advanced undergrad. 
standing. 3(2-3) F. A study of agricultural and associated processing wastes. Special 
laboratory techniques required for the characterization of these wastes will be emphasized. 
Principles and examples considered will be utilized to develop waste management and non- 
destructive waste utilization systems that are integral to the total operation. Humenik 

BAE (FS) 585 Biorheology. Preqs.: PY 205, ESM 307. 3(2-2) S. The concepts of strain, 
stress and the mechanical viscoelastic properties of biological solids, fluids and slurries. The 
time-dependent deformation and flow of bio-materials elements of strength of materials, 
rheological equations and model concepts, creep-relaxation and dynamic behavior, contact 
problems and the Boltzman superposition principle as a function of time, temperature and 
moisture content. Hamann 

BAE 590 Special Problems. Preq.: Sr. or grad. standing in biological and agricultural 
engineering. Credits Arranged. Each student will select a subject on which to do research 
and write a technical report on the results. The individual may choose a subject pertaining to 
his or her particular interest in any area of study in biological and agricultural engineering. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BAE 654 Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics in Bioengineering. Preq.: MA 511. 3(3-0) 
Alt. S. Generalized classical thermodynamics is extended by Onsager's relations to provide a 



66 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

theoretical basis for analyzing the energetics of systems that include life processes. Topics il- 
lustrate applications to special systems including isothermal diffusion and sedimentation, 
membrane permeability, transport processes in continuous systems, and systems with tem- 
perature gradients. Johnson 

BAE 661 Analysis of Function and Design of Biological and Physical Systems. Preq.: 
CI. 3(2-3) Alt. F. Mathematical and analytical techniques and principles essential in the 
analysis and design of machines and systems which encompass both the biological and the 
physical domains and their interfaces. Analytical treatment of physical and biological 
systems and the functional analysis of machine components are studied to bridge the gap 
between theories and applications. Control systems synthesis and design are treated with 
emphasis on quantitative dynamic relations between elements and system response using 
transfer function and computer simulation techniques. Bowen, Huang 

BAE (SSC) 671 Theory of Drainage— Saturated Flow. Preq.: MA 513. 3(3-0) Alt. F. 
Physical concepts and properties of fluids and porous media are discussed in relation to soil 
water movement. The fundamental laws and equations governing saturated flow in porous 
media are derived and discussed. Mathematical solutions of steady-state and transient flow 
equations are analyzed to determine their applicability to drainage problems. Analogs and 
models of particular drainage problems are considered. Skaggs 

BAE (SSC) 674 Theory of Drainage— Unsaturated Flow. Preq.: BAE 671 or equivalent. 
3(3-0) Alt. S. Forces involved and theories utilized in saturated flow of porous media are dis- 
cussed in relation to soil moisture movement. Steady-state and transient unsaturated flow 
equations for horizontal and vertical moisture movement are developed and solved. The solu- 
tions are applied to present day laboratory and field technology. Molecular diffusion and 
hydrodynamic dispersion are considered in light of current tracing techniques. Skaggs 

BAE 690 Special Topics. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-4. A study of topics in the special fields 
of interest of graduate students under the direction of the graduate faculty. 

Graduate Staff 

BAE 695 Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing in BAE. 1(1-0) F,S. Elaboration of the subject 
areas, techniques and methods peculiar to professional interest through presentations of per- 
sonal and published works; opportunity for students to present and critically defend ideas, 
concepts and inferences. Discussions to point up analytical solutions and analogies between 
problems in biological and agricultural engineering and other technologies, and to present 
the relationship of biological and agricultural engineering to the socio-economic enterprise. 

So well 

BAE 699 Research in Biological and Agricultural Engineering. Preq.: Grad. standing 
in BAE. Credits Arranged. Performance of a particular investigation of concern to biological 
and agricultural engineering. The study will begin with the selection of a problem and 
culminate with the presentation of a thesis. Graduate Staff 



Biological Sciences 

Professor J. L. Apple, Associate Director of Academic Affairs and Research for the 
Biological Sciences 

Professor C. F. Lytle, Teaching Coordinator 

There is no separate graduate major in the biological sciences, but several inter- 
disciplinary courses are coordinated by the Biological Sciences Interdepartmental 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 67 

Program of the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. These courses are ap- 
plicable to several major and minor programs. Current courses include: 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

BS (ENT) 410 Biology of Insects. Preqs.: ZO 201, 202. 3(2-2) F,Sum. 

BS 495 Special Topics in Biology. 1-6 F,S,Sum. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BS 590 Special Problems in Biological Instrumentation. Preq.: CI. 1-3 F,S. Basic com- 
ponents of spectrophotometers including light sources, dispersing devices, detectors and 
read-out methods; theoretical and practical aspects of electron microscopy; basics of analog 
and digital computing methods and applications of computers to biological research; 
methods of separation and identification of bio-polymers; principles of measurement; the ap- 
plication of electronics in biological measuring and sensing devices; and human cytological 
techniques. Course consists of five-week modules (sections) devoted to specific types of 
instrumentation. Graduate Staff 

BS 690 Seminar in Cell Biology. Preqs.: Grad. standing, background in biology or 
chemistry. 1(1-0) S. A topical appraisal of current literature in selected areas of cell biology 
through presentations and discussions by students, faculty and visiting scientists. 

Graduate Staff 

BS 696 Topics in Biological Ultrastructure. Preq.: Grad. standing (background 
preferably in biology). 1(1-0) F. A survey of the ultrastructure of living organisms from 
viruses to higher plants and animals by means of illustrated lectures. The changes in fine 
structure associated with differentiating cells and with cells in various metabolic states are 
examined. Graduate Staff 



Biomathematics 

For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see statistics, 
page 247. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

BMA 493 Special Topics in Biomathematics. Preq.: CI. 1-3 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BMA 501 Theoretical Biochemistry I. Preqs.: MA 405, CH 433, BCH 551, or CI. 3(3-0) F. 
Application of physical theory and mathematics to biochemistry. Examination of basic prin- 
ciples of molecular theory, reaction rate theory, statistical mechanics and nonequilibrium 
thermodynamics as applied to biochemical systems. (Offered F 1979 and alt. years.) Gold 

BMA 502 Theoretical Biochemistry II. Preq.: BMA 501. 3(3-0) S. Continuation of BMA 
501. Coupling of diffusion and chemical reactions. Mathematical description of enzyme con- 
trol, coupled sequences and enzyme reactions, feedback loops and oscillatory reactions. Ex- 
perimentally oriented topics include theory of chemical relaxation and tracer dynamics. (Of- 
fered S 1980 and alt. years.) Gold 



68 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

BMA 511 Introduction to Mathematical Modeling of Biological Systems. Preqs.: MA 
112 and graduate standing in a biological or related field. 3(3-1) S. Intended primarily for stu- 
dents in the biological sciences. Topics include use of diagrams and flow charts in 
mathematical modeling, probabilistic and deterministic description of dynamic processes, 
feedback relations, steady states and homeostasis at the biochemical, physiological and 
ecosystem levels. Gold 

BMA (MA, ST) 571 Biomathematics I. Preq.: Advanced calculus, reasonable background 
in biology or CI. 3(3-0) F. The role of theory construction and model building in the develop- 
ment of experimental science. Induction vs. deduction. The historical development of 
mathematical theories and models for the growth of one-species populations (logistic and off- 
shoots), including consideration of age distributions (matrix theory, Leslie and Lopez; con- 
tinuous theory, Lotka). Some of the more elementary theories on the growth of organisms 
(von Bertalanffy, with applications to ecology; allometric theories, cultures grown in a 
chemostat). Mathematical theories of two and more species systems (predator-prey, competi- 
tion, symbiosis; according to the Volterra- Lotka schemes, including present-day research), 
and discussion of some related models for chemical reaction kinetics. Much emphasis is 
placed on scrutiny of the biological concepts as well as of the mathematical structure of the 
models in order to uncover both weak and strong points of the models discussed. 
Mathematical treatment of the differential equations in these models stresses qualitative 
and geometric aspects. van der Vaart 

BMA (MA, ST) 572 Biomathematics II. Preq.: BMA 571, elementary probability theory. 
3(3-0) S. Continuation of topics of BMA 571. Some more advanced mathematical techniques 
concerning nonlinear differential equations of the types encountered in BMA 571: several 
concepts of stability, asymptotic directions, periodic models. Comparison of deterministic 
and stochastic models for several biological problems including birth and death processes. 
Certain aspects of linear system theory (time-invariant and variable models) used for the 
analysis of biological systems. Discussion of various applications of mathematics to biology, 
e.g., theories of aging, some recent research. van der Vaart 

BMA 591 Special Topics. Preq.: CI. Maximum 3. F,S. Directed readings, problem sets, 
written and oral reports as dictated by need and interest of student; new 500-level courses 
during the developmental phase. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BMA 691 Advanced Special Topics. Preq.: CI. 1-3 F,S. Directed readings, problem sets, 
written and oral reports as dictated by need and interest of student; new 600-level courses 
during the developmental phase. Graduate Staff 

BMA 694 Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) F,S. Graduate students in 
biomathematics are expected to attend through most of their residence period. 

Graduate Staff 

BMA 699 Research. Credits Arranged. F,S. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 69 

Botany 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. P. Miksche, Head 

Professors: C. E. Anderson, R. J. Downs, J. W. Hardin, G. R. Noggle, J. L. Thomas, 
J. R. Troyer; Professors USDA: W. W. Heck, H. E. Pattee, H. Seltmann; 
Professors Emeriti: D. B. Anderson, H. T. Scofield, B. W. Wells, L. A. Whitford; 
Associate Professors: U. Blum, R. C. Fites, R. L. Mott, E. D. Seneca, A. M. 
Witherspoon; Associate Professor USDA: D. W. DeJong; Assistant Professors: 
R. L. Beckmann, J. F. Reynolds, J. M. Stucky, C. G. Van Dyke, T. R. Wentworth, 
T. E. Wynn; Assistant Professor USDA: H. H. Rogers 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: A. W. Cooper, B. J. Copeland, M. M. Goodman, J. S. Kahn, B. W. Smith, 
R. J. Thomas, D. H. Timothy; Professor USDA: D. E. Moreland 

The Department of Botany offers programs leading to the Master of Life 
Sciences (non-thesis), Master of Science in Ecology, Master of Science and Doctor 
of Philosophy degrees. 

Excellent physical facilities are available for instruction and research in all 
phases of the departmental program. The Phytotron (part of a two-unit controlled 
environment facility operated in collaboration with Duke University) offers oppor- 
tunities for research in experimental taxonomy, ecology, morphology and plant 
physiology. The department supports a research program in plant cell and tissue 
culture. A herbarium supports studies in systematic botany, and is augmented by 
herbaria in the Departments of Botany at nearby Duke University and the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Field laboratories are available at the coast, 
in the Piedmont and in the mountains. The department participates in tropical 
biology programs through university membership in the Organization for Tropical 
Studies. 

All graduate students will participate at least one semester during a degree 
program in the departmental instructional program. Graduate students are expec- 
ted to attend and participate in the seminar program every semester they are in 
residence. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

BO 400 Plant Diversity. Preq.: BO 200. 4(3-3) F. 

BO (CS) 402 Economic Botany. Preq.: BO 200. 3(2-3) S. 

BO 403 Systematic Botany. Preq.: BS 100 or BS 105 or BO 200. 4(2-4) S. 

BO 413 Introductory Plant Anatomy. Preq.: BO 200. 3(2-3) S. 

BO (ZO) 414 Cell Biology. Preqs.: CH 223, PY 212, ZO 201 or 203. 3(3-0) F. 



70 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

BO 421 Plant Physiology. Preqs.: BS 100 or BS 105 or BO 200 and one year of college 
chemistry. 4(3-3) F,S. 

BO 480 Air Pollution Biology. Preq.: An introductory biological course and chemistry, jr. 
standing. 3(2-3) S. 

BO 499 Independent Study in Botany. Preq.: At least eight hours of BO, advanced 
standing and presentation of plan of work approved by a faculty member. 1-3 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BO 510 Plant Anatomy. Preq.: BO 200. 4(2-6) F. A study of the cells, tissues and organs of 
common flowering plants and gymnosperms. Anderson 

BO 522 Advanced Morphology and Phylogeny of Seed Plants. Preq.: BO 403. 4(3-3) S. A 
comprehensive survey of the morphology and evolution of angiosperms and gymnosperms. 
Special emphasis is given to vegetative and reproductive morphology of fossil and living 
forms, and to their presumed evolutionary relationships. (Offered 1978-79 and alt. years.) 

Hardin 

BO 524 Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes. Preq.: BO 403. 4(2-6) F. A course dealing with 
three large, economically and ecologically important plant families. A working familiarity 
will be achieved through an introduction to the special terminology used in dealing with 
these plants, extensive field work emphasizing keying out plants collected and a study of the 
recently developed modern classification of the grasses. (Offered 1979-80 and alt. years.) 

Stucky 

BO 544 Plant Geography. Preqs.: BO 403, BO (ZO) 360, GN 411 or equivalents. 3(3-0) S. A 
course in descriptive and interpretive plant geography, synthesizing data from the fields of 
ecology, genetics, geography, paleobotany and taxonomy. Includes a survey of the present 
distribution of major vegetation types throughout the world, a discussion of the history and 
development of this present pattern of vegetation and a discussion of the principles and 
theories of plant geography. (Offered in 1979-80 and alt. years.) Graduate Staff 

BO 551 Advanced Plant Physiology I. Preqs.: General botany or biology, and 
biochemistry. 3(3-0) F. The first half of a two-semester sequence covering the field of plant 
physiology. Topics will include plant organization, metabolism, water relations, solute rela- 
tions, and respiration. Troyer, Noggle. 

BO 552 Advanced Plant Physiology II. Preqs.: General botany or biology, and 
biochemistry. 3(3-0) S. The second half of a two-semester sequence covering the field of plant 
physiology. Topics will include photobiology, photosynthesis, inorganic nutrition, plant 
growth substances, physiology of seeds, and the physiology of vegetative and reproductive 
growth and development. Noggle, Wynn 

BO 553 Laboratory in Advanced Plant Physiology I. Preq. or coreq.: BO 551. 1(0-3) F. 
Laboratory to accompany BO 551 Advanced Plant Physiology I Graduate Staff 

BO 554 Laboratory in Advanced Plant Physiology II. Preq. or coreq.: BO 552. 1(0-3) S. 
Laboratory to accompany BO 552 Advanced Plant Physiology II Graduate Staff 

BO (ZO) 560 Principles of Ecology. Preq.: Three semesters of college level biology 
courses. 4(3-3) F. A consideration of the principles of ecology at the graduate level. Each of 
the major subject areas of ecology is developed in sufficient depth to provide a factual and 
philosophical framework for the understanding of ecology. Blum 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 71 

BO 561 Physiological Ecology. Preqs.: BO 421 and BO (ZO) 560 or equivalent. 4(3-3) S. 
The plant community is approached from a physiological standpoint. Emphasis will be 
placed on the individual in the community and how it responds to its immediate environment 
on a short- and long-term basis. (Offered 1978-79 and alt. years.) Blum 

BO 565 Plant Community Ecology. Preq.: BO (ZO) 560 or BO (ZO) 360 or equivalent. 4(3- 
3) F. Consideration of the structure and function of terrestrial vascular plant communities, 
with emphasis on classical and recent research. Topics include measurement and description 
of community properties, classification, ordination, vegetation pattern in relation to environ- 
ment, ecological succession, and a survey of the vegetation of North America. 

Wentworth 

BO 570 Quantitative Ecology. Preqs.: BO (ZO) 560 and ST 512 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. A 
course emphasizing the quantitative techniques and theories of vegetation analysis. Topics 
include sampling methodologies, the evaluation of sample adequacy, spatial patterns and 
species associations, the measurement and interpretation of ecological diversity, gradient 
analysis and classification of communities, and plant population dynamics. Each of these 
topics will be considered from a theoretical and a practical basis. This involves local field 
trips, sampling, data analysis, computer programming, and interpretation in light of con- 
temporary ecological theories. Reynolds 

BO (MB) 574 Phycology. Preq.: BS 100 or BO 200. 3(1-4) S. An introduction to the struc- 
ture, reproduction and importance of organisms which may be included in the algae. 
Emphasis is on the local freshwater flora and the ecology of important species. 

Witherspoon 

BO (MB, PP) 575 The Fungi. Preq.: BO 200 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. An overview of the 
fungi within the framework of a survey of the major classes. Van Dyke 

BO (MB, PP) 576 The Fungi— Lab. Coreq.: BO 575. 1(0-3) F. Illustrative material of the 
fungal assemblages discussed in BO 575. Van Dyke 

BO 590 Topical Problems. Preq.: CI. 1-3 F,S. Discussions and readings on problems of 
current interest in the fields of ecology, anatomy and morphology, taxonomy, plant 
physiology, and cell biology. May be repeated with a change in topic for a maximum of six 
credits. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BO 612 Plant Morphogenesis. Preq.: Six hours of botany equivalent to BO 400 and BO 
421. 4(3-3) S. A review and synthesis of the factors involved in the development of plant 
form. Levels of control from the molecular to the whole organism will be considered. (Of- 
fered in 1979-80 and alt. years.) Mott 

BO 620 Advanced Taxonomy. Preq.: BO 403. 4(2-6) S. Principles and techniques including 
history of classifications, rules of nomenclature, literature, biosystematic methods, 
monographic techniques, and concepts of categories. (Offered in 1979-80 and alt. years.) 

Hardin, Stucky 

BO (PP) 625 Advanced Mycology. 4(2-6) F. (See plant pathology, page 217.) 

BO 631 Water Relations of Plants. Preq.: BO 551 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. A discussion of 
the physiological water relations of plants with emphasis on theoretical principles and quan- 
titative description. (Offered 1978-79 and alt. years.) Troyer 



72 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

BO 633 Plant Growth and Development. Preq.: BO (ZO) 414 or BO 421, organic 
chemistry. 3(3-0) S. An advanced course in plant physiology covering plant growth, develop- 
ment, differentiation, senescence, and biological control mechanisms. Fites 

BO 634 Introduction to the Thermodynamics of Biological Systems. Preq.: BO 551 or 
CI. 3(3-0) S. An introductory development of the thermodynamic theory relevant to 
biological systems together with consideration of examples of biological problems to which 
thermodynamic theory has been applied. (Offered 1979-80 and alt. years.) Troyer 

BO 636 Discussions in Plant Physiology. Preq.: BO (ZO) 414 or BO 421, organic 
chemistry. 1(1-0) F,S. Group discussions at an advanced level on selected topics. 

Graduate Staff 

BO (ZO) 660 Advanced Topics in Ecology I. Preq.: BO (ZO) 560. 4(3-3) S. Subject matter 
in the major fields of ecology will be developed through seminars and lectures, and principles 
will be illustrated by laboratory exercises and field trips. Topics covered include microen- 
vironment, community ecology, ecosystems and nutrient cycling. Graduate Staff 

BO (ZO) 661 Advanced Topics in Ecology II. 4(3-3) S. (See zoology, page 271.) 

BO 662 Applied Coastal Ecology. Preq.: BO (ZO) 360 or BO (ZO) 560. 3(3-0) S. Course will 
cover the environmental factors, the vegetative communities, and man's influence on the 
ecology of the Coastal Plain of North Carolina. Emphasis will be placed on the coastal fringe 
(Outer Banks) and the problems involved in Coastal Zone Management. Course is field and 
problem oriented and is designed primarily for graduate students in environmentally- 
oriented programs. (Offered in 1978-79 and alt. years.) Seneca 

BO 691 Botany Seminar. 1(1-0) F.S. Graduate Staff 

BO 693 Special Problems in Botany. Credits Arranged. Directed research in some phase 
of botany other than a thesis problem, but designed to provide experience and training in 
research. Graduate Staff 

BO 699 Research. Credits Arranged. F,S. Original research preliminary to writing a 
master's thesis or a doctoral dissertation. Graduate Staff 



Chemical Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. K. Ferrell, Head. 

Professors: K. O. Beatty Jr., R. P. Gardner, H. B. Hopfenberg, D. C. Martin, J. F. 
Seely, H. B. Smith, E. P. Stahel, V. T. Stannett; Professors Emeriti: R. Bright, 
W. L. McCabe, E. M. Schoenborn; Adjunct Professor: D. R. Squire; Associate 
Professors: R. M. Felder— Graduate Administrator, D. B. Marsland, M. R. Over- 
cash, R. W. Rousseau; Adjunct Associate Professors: T. R. Hauser, J. L. 
Williams; Assistant Professors: J. E. Helt, W. J. Koros 

The Department of Chemical Engineering offers programs of advanced study- 
leading to the Master of Science, Master of Chemical Engineering and Doctor of 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 73 

Philosophy degrees. Students enrolling for graduate study in the department nor- 
mally have a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering, but programs can be 
arranged to accommodate students with degrees in applied mathematics, 
chemistry, physics and other branches of engineering. 

The department occupies 40,000 square feet in the east wing of Riddick Engineer- 
ing Laboratories. Within the building are several general-purpose laboratories for 
graduate research, fully staffed machine and electronics shops, and a well- 
equipped instrumental analysis laboratory. A recently completed pilot-scale 
fluidized bed coal gasifier and gas cleaning plant provides a unique facility for coal 
processing research, and pilot plants are also available for the study of heat 
transfer, reaction kinetics, and mixing phenomena in polymerization reactors. A 
terminal link to an IBM 370/165 computer provides rapid service on all digital jobs, 
and a Fischer control computer and several analog, hybrid and data acquisition 
computers provide excellent capabilities for studies of process control. 

Extensive research in the department is carried out in the area of polymer 
science and engineering. Graduate and post-doctoral efforts in this field include 
studies of ionic and free-radical polymerization, grafting reactions, membrane 
technology and design of polymerization reactors. Other active research areas in- 
clude pollution monitoring and control, coal gasification, chemical reaction 
engineering, separation processes — particularly crystallization, distillation, and 
membrane separation techniques, heat transfer, process control and optimization, 
solution thermodynamics and biomedical engineering. 

The proximity of UNC-Chapel Hill, Duke University, and the Research Triangle 
Park lends considerable support to departmental research programs. The Environ- 
mental Protection Agency (EPA), for example, has its principal air pollution 
research facility in the Research Triangle Park, and arrangements can be made for 
graduate students studying air pollution problems to work at the EPA center un- 
der the joint direction of EPA and University staff members. 

A brochure describing in greater detail opportunities for graduate study and 
research in chemical engineering as well as available fellowships and 
assistantships may be obtained upon request from the department head. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

CHE 425 Process Measurement and Control I. Preqs.: CHE 225, 327. 3(2-2) F. 

CHE 426 Process Measurement and Control II. Preq.: CHE 425 or EE 435 or MAE 435. 

3(2-2) S. 

CHE 432 Chemical Engineering Lab III. Preq.: CHE 431. 2(0-4) F.S. 

CHE 446 Chemical Process Kinetics. Preq.: CHE 315. 3(3-0) F. 

CHE 451 Chemical Engineering Design. Preqs.: CHE 315, 327, 432. 3(2-2) F,S. 

CHE (BAE) 465 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering. Preqs.: MA 202 or 212, PY 212 
or 221. 3(3-0) F. 

CHE 495 Seminar in Chemical Engineering. Preq.: One semester required of CHE srs. 

in-0) f.s 



74 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CHE 497 Chemical Engineering Projects. Preq.: Elective of CHE srs. 1-3 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CHE 511 Chemical Engineering Process Modeling. Preqs.: CHE 311, CHE 327, MA 301. 
3(3-0) S. The application of the methods of mathematical analysis to the formulation and 
solution of problems in transport phenomena, process dynamics and chemical reaction 
engineering. Felder 

CHE 513 Thermodynamics I. Preq.: CHE 315. 3(3-0) F. An intermediate course in the ap- 
plication of thermodynamic principles to problems arising in the chemical process industries. 
Chemical reactions and phase separation operations are viewed from a thermodynamic 
standpoint including consideration of their energy efficiencies. Beatty 

CHE 515 Transport Phenomena. Preq.: CHE 327. 3(3-0) S. A theoretical study of 
transport of momentum, energy and matter with emphasis on the latter two. The diffusional 
operations are introduced in the light of the theory. Marsland 

CHE 517 Kinetics and Catalysis. Preq.: CHE 446. 3(3-0) F. Rates of homogeneous and 
heterogeneous chemical reactions; experimental methods and mathematical techniques used 
in the acquisition and analysis of rate data and the design of chemical reactors. Felder 

CHE 521 Mass Transfer Operations. Preq.: CHE 327 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. The theory 
and practice of staged multicomponent mass transfer operations and continuous rate 
processes. Problems unique to specific operations such as extractive and azeotropic distilla- 
tion are discussed. Rousseau 

CHE 523 Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer. Preq.: CHE 311. 3(3-0) F. Convective heat 
transfer in chemical process equipment, such as heat exchangers, chemical reactors, distilla- 
tion and extraction reboilers, etc., and fluid dynamics and heat transfer in multiphase, mul- 
ticomponent and chemically reactive systems. Ferrell 

CHE 525 Chemical Process Control. Preq.: CHE 425. 3(3-0) S. The application of control 
techniques to sampled data chemical process systems. Z-transform and state variable 
methods for the determination of open loop and closed loop system responses and for the syn- 
thesis of controller algorithms. Hybrid computer simulation and control of on-line real time 
processes. Ferrell 

CHE (OR) 527 Optimization of Engineering Processes. Preqs.: CSC 111, MA 301 and 
MA 405. 3(3-0) F. The formulation and solution of process optimization problems, with 
emphasis on nonlinear programming techniques. Computer implementation of optimization 
algorithms, and structuring of process models to increase computational efficiency. 

Felder 

CHE 535 Engineering Economy in Air Pollution Control Systems. Preqs.: MAE 409, CE 
576 or equivalent first course. 3(3-2) F. Design of equipment for the abatement of air pollu- 
tion; estimation of capital cost and operating expense; economic optimization under various 
kinds of tax laws. Marsland 

CHE 541 Cellulose Industries. Preq.: Organic chemistry. 3(3-0) F. Methods of manufac- 
ture and application of cellulose chemical conversion products. Recent developments in the 
field of synthetic fibers, film, lacquers and other cellulose compounds. Seely 

CHE 543 Technology of Plastics. Preq.: Organic chemistry. 3(3-0) S. The properties, 
methods of manufacture and applications of polymeric materials. Koros 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 75 

CHE 561 Biomedical Engineering I: Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer. Preq.: CHE (BAE) 
465 or equivalent background. 3(3-0) S. The physiology requisite to modeling and analysis of 
mammalian systems, coupled with the engineering approach to the biomedical problems of 
flow of fluids (blood, lymph, air, etc.) in the body and thermal transport from the body sur- 
faces. Richardson, Beatty 

CHE (TC) 569 Polymers, Surfactants and Colloidal Materials. Preqs.: CHE 315, CH 
431, CH 223. 3(3-0) F. Relationships between molecular structure and bulk properties of non- 
metallic materials as applied in chemical engineering processes. Applications of surface and 
colloid chemistry and polymer science to product development and processes improvement. 

Hopfenberg 

CHE (TC) 570 Radiation Chemistry and Technology of Polymeric Systems. Preqs.; CH 
221, 431. 3(3-0) S. Principles and practice of isotope and electron beam radiation treatment. 
Applications of high energy radiation in polymer chemistry and technology, including the 
use of radiation to cross-link and degrade polymers. Similarities and differences between 
radiation polymerization and photopolymerization. Stannett, Williams 

CHE 597 Chemical Engineering Projects. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F,S. Independent 
study of some phase of chemical engineering or a related field. Graduate Staff 

CHE 598 Special Topics in Chemical Engineering. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F,S. Direc- 
ted reading of the chemical engineering literature, introduction to research methodology, 
and lectures and seminar discussions on topics which vary from term to term. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CHE 611 Chemical Process Design and Simulation. Preq.: CHE 511. 3(3-0) S. Applica- 
tion of process analysis, simulation and optimization techniques to case studies of complex 
chemical processes. Marsland 

CHE 613 Thermodynamics II. Preq.: CHE 513. 3(3-0) S. Topics in chemical engineering 
thermodynamics are selected for study in accord with the interests of the class. Irreversible 
thermodynamics, thermodynamics of polymers and membrane transport, and improvement 
of thermodynamic efficiencies of unit operations are representative topics. Beatty 

CHE 617 Chemical Reaction Engineering. Preq.: CHE 517. 3(3-0) S. Design, analysis and 
scaleup of chemical reactors. Flow models for homogeneous and heterogeneous reactors, 
reactor stability analysis, and computer solution of reactor design equations. Stahel 

CHE 621 Advanced Mass Transfer. Preq.: CHE 515. 3(3-0) F. Application of transport 
theory and empirical relations to the analysis, synthesis and design of mass-transfer equip- 
ment. Principles and design of absorption, extraction, distillation, humidification and drying 
operations. Rousseau 

CHE 623 Advanced Fluid Dynamics. Preqs.: CHE 515, 523. 3(3-0) S. The principles of 
fluid dynamics and their application to laminar and turbulent flow, flow in closed channels, 
flow in packed beds and porous media, particle technology, industrial rheology and two- 
phase flow. Ferrell 

CHE 624 Advanced Heat Transfer. Preq.: CHE 515. 3(3-0) F. Heat transfer between li- 
quids and solids, optimum operating conditions and design of equipment, conduction, 
heating and cooling of solids, and radiant heat transmission. Beatty 



76 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CHE (TC) 669 Diffusion in Polymers. Preq.: CHE 569 or CI. 2(2-0) S. The theory of small 
molecule transport in polymers; applications of membrane transport processes in the 
chemical, polymer, textile, coatings and natural fiber industries. Hopfenberg 

CHE (TC) 671 Special Topics in Polymer Science. Preq.: CI. 1-3 F. An intensive treat- 
ment of topics in fiber and polymer science and technology selected in accord with the in- 
terests of the class. Stannett 

CHE 693 Advanced Topics in Chemical Engineering. 1-3 F,S. Recent developments in 
chemical engineering theory and practice. The topics will vary from term to term. 

Graduate Staff 

CHE 695 Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Weekly seminars on topics of current interest given by resi- 
dent faculty members, graduate students and visiting lecturers. Graduate Staff 

CHE 699 Research. Credits Arranged. F,S. Individual research in chemical engineering. A 
report on this research is required as a graduate thesis. Graduate Staff 



Chemistry 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor C. L. Bumgardner, Head 

Professors: H. A. Bent, J. Bordner, L. H. Bowen, M. K. DeArmond, L. D. Freed- 
man, F. W. Getzen, F. C. Hentz Jr., Z Z. Hugus Jr., S. G. Levine, R. H. 
Loeppert— Assistant Head, G. G. Long, C. G. Moreland, A. F. Schreiner, W. P. 
Tucker, G. H. Wahl Jr., R. C. White; Adjunct Professor: M. E. Wall; Professors 
Emeriti: G. 0. Doak, W. J. Peterson, W. A. Reid, P. P. Sutton; Associate 
Professors: H. H. Carmichael — Graduate Adynitiistrator, T. C. Caves, A. F. 
Coots, C. E. Gleit, K. W. Hanck, L. A. Jones, M. L. Miles, D. W. Wertz; Assistant 
Professors: C. B. Boss, Y. Ebisuzaki, W. L. Switzer, T. M. Ward 

The Department of Chemistry offers programs leading to the Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Major fields of specialization are analytical, in- 
organic, organic, nuclear and physical chemistry. A wide variety of advanced 
courses and a broad spectrum of research topics provide preparation for almost 
every type of position open to a chemist with an advanced degree. 

A student entering graduate work in chemistry should have a bachelor's degree 
in chemistry or its equivalent. This includes the equivalent of one-year courses in 
general, organic, physical and analytical chemistry, and a semester of inorganic 
chemistry. At least one year of college physics and two years of mathematics, in- 
cluding differential equations, are necessary. Students who fail to meet these re- 
quirements may in some cases be admitted on a provisional basis. 

With a large graduate faculty and favorable graduate student to faculty ratio, 
the chemistry department emphasizes individual attention, small classes and per- 
sonal collaboration on research with faculty members. Among the variety of active 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 77 

research projects available for thesis work are organic and inorganic synthesis, 
structure and properties of organometallic compounds and transition metal com- 
plexes, stereochemistry of natural and synthetic products, kinetics and 
mechanisms of reactions, radiochemistry, microanalysis, electrochemistry, quan- 
tum chemistry, crystallography, and infrared, Raman, Mossbauer, nuclear 
magnetic resonance, nuclear quadrupole resonance, electron spin resonance, and 
natural and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy. 

The department is equipped with standard instruments and apparatus for 
teaching and research. Many items of specialized equipment are available in- 
cluding recording spectrophotometers covering the range from far infrared to ul- 
traviolet, three nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers, gas chromatographs, 
mass spectrometer, electron spin resonance spectrometer, circular dichroism recor- 
der and spectropolarimeter, nuclear quadrupole resonance spectrometer, 
Mossbauer spectrometer and X-ray diffractometer. A complete glassblowing 
facility manned by a glassblower is available for constructing special apparatus. 
An electronics shop is also on the premises. All research activities of the depart- 
ment are concentrated in a nine-story laboratory building equipped with spacious 
facilities and completely air-conditioned. 

The department has available for qualified applicants teaching and research 
assistantships, as well as a number of fellowships. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

CH 401 Systematic Inorganic Chemistry. Coreq.: CH 431 or CH 331. 3(3-0) S. 

CH 411 Analytical Chemistry I. Preq.: CH 434. 4(2-6) F. 

CH 413 Analytical Chemistry II. Preq.: CH 411. 4(2-6) S. 

CH 428 Qualitative Organic Analysis. Preq.: CH 223. 3(1-6) F,S. 

CH 431 Physical Chemistry I. Preqs.: CH 107, MA 202, PY 203 or 208; Coreq.: MA 301. 
3(3-0) F.S. 

CH 433 Physical Chemistry II. Preqs.: CH 431, MA 301. 3(2-1) F,S. 

CH 434 Physical Chemistry II Laboratory. Coreq.: CH 433. 2(0-6) S. 

CH 435 Physical Chemistry III. Preqs.: CH 431, MA 301. 3(3-0) F. 

CH (TC) 461 Chemistry of Fibers. Preq.: CH 223. 3(3-0) F. 

CH 490 Chemical Preparations. Preq.: Three years CH. 3(0-9) F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CH 501 Inorganic Chemistry I. Preq.: CH 433. 3(3-0) F. The study of modern inorganic 
chemistry from the point of view of the chemical bond, molecular structure, and spec- 
troscopy. The course is built upon several topics chosen from group theory, molecular sym- 
metry, molecular orbital and crystal field theories, electronegativity, solid state, magnetic 
properties, electronic absorption, ORD, CD, and MCD, Mossbauer, nmr, nqr, ESCA, 
photoelectron, and vibrational spectroscopies. 



78 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CH 503 Inorganic Chemistry II. Preq.: CH 501. 3(3-0) S. This course is a continuation of 
CH 501 and rests heavily upon the latter. Knowledge of physical methods of investigation is 
employed in order to understand the basis and systematize the chemistry of representative 
elements, transition metals (3d, 4d, 5d), lanthanides and actinides. Methods of synthesis are 
discussed and reasons for their success given, and for these reasons areas of discussion are 
chosen from nonaqueous solvents, acids and bases, inorganic reaction mechanisms of impor- 
tance or contemporary interest, solid state reactions, coordination chemistry including 
chelates and organometallic compounds, crystal field stabilization energy, Jahn-Teller and 
trans effects, stabilization of valence states, and some bio-inorganic chemistry. 

CH 511 Chemical Spectroscopy. Preq.: CH 433. 3(3-0) F. Theory, analytical applications 
and interpretation of spectra as applied to chemical problems. Major emphasis will be placed 
upon ultraviolet, visible and infrared spectra. 

CH 515 Chemical Instrumentation. Preq.: CH 431; Coreq.: CH 411. 3(3-0) S. Basic elec- 
tronic components and circuits, the response of laboratory instruments, design and modifica- 
tion of typical electronic control and measurement systems. Emphasis will be placed on the 
transducers and control elements utilized in chemical research. 

CH 517 Physical Methods of Elemental Trace Analysis. Preq.: CH 315 or 331 or CI. 3(3- 
0) F. The principles and applications of currently used methods of trace analysis are presen- 
ted. Designed for students with little or no experience in trace analysis but with a strong in- 
terest in or need for analytical data at the trace level. Topics include pulse polarography, 
potentiometry, UV-Vis spectrophotometry, atomic absorption, emission spectrometry, 
fluorescence, neutron activation analysis, and spark source mass spectrometry. 

CH 518 Trace Analysis Laboratory. Coreq.: CH 517 or CI. 2(0-6) F. The trace element con- 
tent of samples is determined by a variety of instrumental techniques including UV-Vis spec- 
trophotometry, fluorescence, emission spectrometry, atomic absorption, pulse polarography, 
and neutron activation analysis. 

CH 521 Advanced Organic Chemistry I. Preqs.: CH 223, 433 or 435. 3(3-0) F. Structure, 
stereochemistry and reactions of the various classes of hydrocarbons. The molecular orbital 
treatment of bonding and reactivity of alkenes, the conformational interpretation and 
cycloalkane and cycloaklene reactivity, and the application of optical isomerism to the study 
of reaction mechanisms will be emphasized. 

CH 523 Advanced Organic Chemistry II. Preq.: CH 521. 3(3-0) S. An introduction to acid- 
base theory and mechanistic organic chemistry as applied to synthetically useful organic 
reactions. 

CH 525 Physical Methods in Organic Chemistry. Preqs.: CH 223 and 433 or 435. 3(3-0) 
S. Application of physical methods to the solution of structural problems in organic 
chemistry. Emphasis will be on spectral methods including infrared, ultraviolet, nuclear 
magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, electron paramagnetic resonance, X-ray and elec- 
tron diffraction, and optical rotatory dispersion. 

CH 531 Chemical Thermodynamics. Preqs.: CH 433, MA 301. 3(3-0) F. An extension of 
elementary principles to the treatment of ideal and real gases, ideal solutions, electrolytic 
solutions, galvanic cells, surface systems and irreversible processes. An introduction to 
statistical thermodynamics and the estimation of thermodynamic functions from spec- 
troscopic data. 

CH 533 Chemical Kinetics. Preqs.: CH 433, MA 301. 3(3-0) S. An intensive survey of the 
basic principles of chemical kinetics with emphasis on experimental and mathematical 
techniques, elements of the kinetic theory, and theory of the transition state. Applications to 
gas reactions, reactions in solution and mechanism studies. (Offered S 1980 and alt. years.) 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 79 

CH 535 Surface Phenomena. Preqs.: CH 433, MA 301. 3(3-0) S. An intensive survey of the 
topics of current interest in surface phenomena. Formulations of basic theories are pre- 
sented together with illustrations of their current applications. (Offered S 1980 and alt. 
years.) 

CH 537 Quantum Chemistry- Preqs.: MA 301, CH 435, or PY 407. 3(3-0) S. The elements 
of wave mechanics applied to stationary energy states and time dependent phenomena. Ap- 
plications of quantum theory to chemistry, particularly chemical bonds. 

CH 539 Colloid Chemistry. Preq.: CH 220, 315 or 331, or CI. 3(2-3) S. Theories, basic prin- 
ciples and fundamental concepts including preparation and behavior of sols, gels, emulsions, 
foams, and aerosols and topics in areas of adsorption, Donnan equilibrium dialysis and 
small-particle dynamics. Laboratory includes independent project studies in specialized 
areas. (Offered S 1979 and alt. years.) 

CH 545 Radiochemistry. Preq.: PY 410 or CH 431. 3(2-3) S. The applications of radioac- 
tivity to chemistry and the applications of chemistry to the radioactive elements, par- 
ticularly the transuranium elements and fission products. (Offered S 1979 and alt. years.) 

CH (TC) 562 Physical Chemistry of High Polymers— Bulk Properties. 3(3-0) F. (See 
textile chemistry, page 257.) 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CH 625 Organic Reaction Mechanisms. Preqs.: CH 523, CH 433. 3(3-0) S. A study of the 
effects of structure and substituents on the direction and rates of organic reactions. 

CH 627 Chemistry of Metal-Organic Compounds. Preq.: CH 521. 3(3-0) F. Preparation, 
properties and reactions of compounds containing the carbon-metal bond, with a brief 
description of their uses. 

CH 631 Chemical Thermodynamics II. Preq.: CH 531. 3(3-0) S. Statistical interpretation 
of thermodynamics; use of partition functions; introduction to quantum statistics; applica- 
tion of statistical mechanics to chemical problems, including calculation of thermodynamic 
properties, equilibria and rate processes. 

CH (BCH) 659 Natural Products. Preqs.: CH 523, 525 or CI. 3(3-0) F. Illustrative studies 
of structure determination, synthesis and biosynthesis of natural substances. Modern 
physical methods and fundamental chemical concepts are stressed. Examples are chosen 
from such classes as alkaloids, terpenes, steroids and antibiotics. 

CH 691 Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing in CH. 1(1-0) F,S. Scientific articles, progress 
reports on research, and special problems of interest to chemists are reviewed and discussed. 

CH 695 Special Topics in Chemistry. Preq.: CI. Maximum 3 F,S. Critical study of special 
problems in one of the branches of chemistry. 

CH 699 Chemical Research. Preq.: Grad. standing in CH. Credits Arranged. F,S. Special 
problems that will furnish material for a thesis. A maximum of six semester credits is 
allowed toward a master's degree; there is no limitation on credits in the doctoral program. 



80 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Civil Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. L. Dean, Head 

Professor P. Z. Zia, Associate Head 

Professors: M. Amein, W. F. Babcock, T. S. Chang, P. D. Cribbins, R. A. Douglas, J. 
F. Ely, R. E. Fadum, W. S. Galler, N. S. Grigg, K. S. Havner, C. L. Heimbach, A.- 
A. I. kashef, L. J. Langfelder, P. H. McDonald, W. G. Mullen, C. Smallwood Jr., 
C. C. Tung, M. E. Uyanik, H. E. Wahls— Graduate Administrator, Professor 
Emeritus: C. R. Bramer; Associate Professors: W. L. Bingham, E. D. Gurley, Y. 
Horie, J. L. Machemehl, H. R. Malcom Jr., J. F. Mirza, S. W. Nunnally, J. C. 
Smith; Assistatit Professors: B. D. Barnes, A. C. Chao, J. L. Hulsey, D. W. 
Johnston, V. C. Matzen, G. N. Richardson 

The Department of Civil Engineering offers programs of study leading to the 
Master of Civil Engineering, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 
Students may major in construction engineering, soil mechanics and foundation 
engineering, structural engineering and mechanics, transportation engineering or 
sanitary and water resources engineering. 

The Master of Civil Engineering degree, emphasizing engineering design and 
practice, is accredited by the Engineering Council for Professional Development 
(ECPD). Admission to this degree program is restricted to qualified students with 
a B.S. degree in civil engineering accredited by ECPD. The student is encouraged to 
include a design project course in his or her program of study and must pass com- 
prehensive written and oral examinations. No thesis is required. 

The thesis is optional for the Master of Science degree program. With the thesis 
option, the program may include no more than six hours of research. For the non- 
thesis option, at least three hours of independent study and a comprehensive writ- 
ten examination are required. Both options require a final oral examination. 

For the doctoral program, there are no definite requirements in credit hours. The 
program of study is developed to fit individual needs. A reading knowledge of 
scientific literature in one modern foreign language is required. 

The faculty is engaged in broad research areas including deterministic and 
probabilistic structural theories and mechanics, fundamental behavior of soils und 
structures, highway safety, land use and urban planning, hydraulics and 
hydrology, materials, waste disposal and pollution control. Many of the investiga- 
tions are sponsored by industries and federal and state agencies including the con- 
tinuing North Carolina Cooperative Highway Research Program. Graduate stu- 
dents are assigned office and laboratory spaces for study and research. 

The department cooperates with other University divisions in joint programs. 
Qualified students may schedule courses in this department and in the Department 
of City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to 
receive a dual degree, a Master of Science with a major in transportation engineer- 
ing and a Master of Regional Planning. Multidisciplinary study and research 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 81 

programs are also available through the North Carolina Highway Safety Research 
Institute, Water Resources Research Institute and the Center for Marine and 
Coastal Studies. 

Students in other disciplines may develop minor areas of study within the 
framework of departmental course offerings. In particular, courses of instruction 
in stream sanitation and industrial waste disposal provide the types of training in 
pollution often in demand by industry. 

A brochure and supplementary information on graduate study, research, and 
assistantships and fellowships are available upon request from the head of the civil 
engineering department. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

CE 406 Transportation Engineering II. Preq.: CE 305. 3(2-2) F. 

CE 425 Intermediate Structural Analysis. Preq.: CE 325. 3(3-0) S. 

CE 427 Structural Engineering II. Preq.: CE 326. 3(2-2) F. 

CE 428 Structural Design in Wood. Preq. : CE 326. 3(2-2) S. 

CE 443 Soil Engineering II. Preq.: CE 342. 3(3-0) F. 

CE 450 Civil Engineering Design. Preq.: One from CE 406, 427, 443, or 484. 3(1-6) S. 

CE 460 Construction Engineering Project. Preqs.: CE 463, 466. 3(1-6) S. 

CE 463 Cost Analysis and Control. Preq.: CE 365. 3(2-3) F. 

CE 464 Legal Aspects of Contracting. Preq.: Sr. standing. 3(3-0) S. 

CE 466 Construction Engineering II. Preqs.: CE 326, 365. 3(2-3) F. 

CE 472 Elements of Air Quality Management. Preqs.: College level physics and sr. 
standing. 3(2-3) S. 

CE 484 Water Resources Engineering II. Preq.: CE 383. 3(3-0) F. 

CE 486 Sanitary Engineering Measurements of Water Quality. Preqs.: Freshman 
chemistry and sr. standing in the Schools of Engineering or Agriculture and Life Sciences. 
3(2-3) S. 

CE (OY, MAS) 487 Physical Oceanography. Preqs.: MA 202 and PY 212. 3(3-0) F. 

CE 498 Special Problems in Civil Engineering. Preq.: Sr. standing in CE or CEC. 1-3 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CE 501 Transportation Systems Analysis. Preq.: CE 406. 3(3-0) F. Application of systems 
analysis to multi-modal transportation studies. Covers the analysis, planning, and design of 
transport facilities for both the public and private sectors. Planning is discussed from the 
short-run as well as the long-run perspective. Heimbach 

CE 502 Transportation Operations. Preq.: CE 406. 3(3-0) S. The analysis of traffic and 
transportation engineering operations. Heimbach 



82 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CE 503 Transportation Design. Preq.: CE 406. 3(2-3) S. The geometric elements of traffic 
and transportation engineering design. Babcock, Cribbins 

CE 504 Water Transportation. Preq.: CE 305. 3(3-0) F. The planning, design, construction 
and operation of waterways, ports, harbors and related facilities. Development of analytical 
techniques for evaluating the feasibility of piers, ports and multipurpose river basin pro- 
jects. The design of marine structures and civil works that are significant in civil engineer- 
ing, including locks, dams, harbors, ports, and contractive and protective works. 

Cribbins 

CE 505 Mass Transportation. Preq.: CE 406. 3(3-0) S. Definition of the characteristics, 
trends, issues, and technologies related to mass transportation, and the identification of 
methodologies applicable to the planning, design and management of mass transportation 
systems. This includes applications to the urban, inter-urban and rural settings for both 
short- and long-range planning horizons. Graduate Staff 

CE 506 Municipal Engineering Projects. Preq.: Sr. standing in CE or CEC. 3(2-3) S. 
Special problems relating to public works, public utilities, urban planning and city engineer- 
ing. Babcock, Smallwood 

CE 507 Airphoto Analysis I. Preq.: Sr. standing. 3(2-3) F,S. Principles and concepts for 
engineering evaluation of aerial photographs, including analysis of soils and surface 
drainage characteristics. Wahls 

CE 511, 512 Continuum Mechanics I, II. Preqs.: ESM 301 or 307, CE 382 or ESM 303, 
MAE 301, MA 405. 3(3-0) F,S. The concepts of stress and strain are presented in generalized 
tensor form. Emphasis is placed on the discussion and relative comparisons of the analytical 
models for elastic, plastic, fluid, viscoelastic, granular and porous media. The underlying 
thermodynamic principles are presented, the associated boundary value problems are for- 
mulated and selected examples are used to illustrate the theory. Chang, McDonald 

CE 513 Theory of Elasticity I. Preq.: ESM 301 or 307. 3(3-0) F. The fundamental equa- 
tions governing the behavior of an elastic solid are developed in various curvilinear coor- 
dinate systems. Plane problems, as well as the St. Venant problem of bending, torsion and 
extension of bars are covered. Displacement fields, stress fields, Airy and complex stress 
functions are among the methods used to obtain solutions. Douglas, Gurley 

CE 521 Advanced Strength of Materials. Preq.: ESM 301 or 307. 3(3-0) F. Stresses and 
strains at a point: rosette analysis; strength theories, stress concentration and fatigue; tor- 
sion and unsymmetrical bending of open and closed sections; inelastic, composite and curved 
beams; energy methods; shear deflections; and membrane stresses in shells. 

Graduate Staff 

CE 522 Elastic Stability. Preqs.: CE 521, MA 301, 405. 3(3-0) S. A study of elastic and 
plastic stability. The stability criterion as a determinant. The energy method and the 
theorem of stationary potential energy. The solution of buckling problems by finite dif- 
ferences and the calculus of variations. The application of successive approximations to 
stability problems. Graduate Staff 

CE 523 Theory of Plates and Shells. Preqs.: ESM 301 or 307, MA 511. 3(3-0) F. Bending 
theory of thin plates; geometry of surfaces and stresses in shells. Various methods of 
analysis are discussed and illustrated by problems of practical interest. Graduate Staff 

CE 524 Analysis and Design of Masonry Structures. Coreq.: CE 427. 3(3-0) F. Theory 
and design of masonry arches, culverts, dams, foundations and masonry walls subjected to 
lateral loads. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 83 

CE 525, 526 Matrix Structural Analysis I, II. Preq.: (525): CE 425; (526): CE 326. 3(3-0) 
F,S. Matrix methods of structural analysis for digital computer solutions for general plane 
frames, trusses, and grids as well as general three-dimensional trusses and frames. Inclusion 
of effects due to prestrain, temperature, elastic stability functions, joint deformations, and 
support settlements. Introduction to finite-element analysis of plane elasticity problems. 

Hulsey, Smith 

CE 531 Structural Models. Preq.: CE 427. 3(2-3) F. Dimensional analysis and structural 
similitude, indirect and direct models, model materials and experimental techniques, in- 
dividual project in structural model analysis. Mirza, Zia 

CE 534 Plastic Analysis and Design. Preq.: CE 427. 3(3-0) S. Theory of plastic behavior of 
steel structures; concept of design for ultimate load and the use of load factors. Analysis and 
design of components of steel frames including bracings and connections. Ely, Smith 

CE 536 Theory and Design of Prestressed Concrete. Coreq.: CE 427. 3(3-0) F. The princi- 
ples and concepts of design in prestressed concrete including elastic and ultimate strength 
analyses for flexure, shear, torsion, bond and deflection. Principles of concordancy and linear 
transformation for indeterminate prestressed structures. Application of prestressing to 
tanks and shells. Mirza, Zia 

CE (MAS, OY) 541 Gravity Wave Theory I. 3(3-0) S. (See physical oceanography, page 
209.) 

CE 543 Hydraulics of Ground Water. Preq.: CE 382 or 342 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Princi- 
ples of ground water hydraulics; theory of flow through idealized porous media; the flow net 
solution; seepage and well problems. Kashef 

CE 544 Foundation Engineering. Preq.: CE 342. 3(3-0) S. Subsoil investigations; excava- 
tions; design of sheeting and bracing systems; control of water; footing, grillage and pile 
foundations; caisson and cofferdam methods of construction. Graduate Staff 

CE 548 Engineering Properties of Soils I. Preq.: CE 342. 3(2-3) F. The study of soil 
properties that are significant in earthwork engineering, including properties of soil solids, 
basic physiochemical concepts, classification, identification, plasticity; permeability, 
capillarity and stabilization. Laboratory work includes classification, permeability and com- 
paction tests. Kashef, Richardson 

CE 549 Engineering Properties of Soils II. Preq.: CE 548. 3(2-3) S. Continuation of CE 
548, including the study of compressibility, stress-strain relations and shear strength 
theories for soil. Laboratory work includes consolidation and shear strength tests. 

Langfelder, Richardson 

CE 551 Theory of Concrete Mixtures. Preq.: CE 332. 3(3-0) F. A study in depth of the 
theory of portland cement concrete mixtures including types and properties of portland 
special cements; chemical reactions; brief examination of history of mixture design; detailed 
study of current design methods; properties of fresh and hardened concretes; strength-age- 
curing relationships; durability; admixtures; special concretes; production and quality con- 
trol. Mullen 

CE 553 Asphalt and Bituminious Materials. Preq.: CE 332. 3(2-3) F. A study in depth of 
properties of asphalts and tars for use in waterproofing and bituminous materials, and 
theories of design of bituminous mixtures for construction and paving uses including types 
and properties of asphalt cements, cutbacks, emulsions, blown asphalts and tars; brief ex- 
amination of historical developments; detailed study of properties and design of bituminous 



84 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

mixtures; and current research. Laboratory work includes standard tests on asphalts, tars, 
and road oils; design, manufacture and testing of trial batches; and current research techni- 
ques. Barnes, Mullen 

CE 555 Highway and Airport Pavement Design. Preq.: CE 406 or 443. 3(2-3) S. 
Theoretical analysis and design of highway and airport pavements with critical evaluation of 
current design practices. Barnes 

CE 557, 558 Properties of Solids I, II. Preqs.: ESM 301 or 307, MAT 301, PY 413. 3(3-0) F. 
Atomic and molecular principles are applied toward an introductory understanding of 
macroscopic material properties. The concept of the grand canonical ensemble average of 
atomic behavior is employed to unify the characterization and interrelationships of material 
properties. Finally, phenomenological behaviors and coupled effects are described within the 
continuum concept. Horie 

CE (BAE, MB) 570 Sanitary Microbiology. Preq.: MB 401 or equivalent. 3(2-3) S. Fun- 
damental aspects of microbiology and biochemistry are presented and related to problems of 
stream pollution, refuse disposal and biological treatment. Laboratory exercises present 
basic microbiological techniques and illustrate from a chemical viewpoint some of the basic 
microbial aspects of waste disposal. Chao 

CE 571 Theory of Water and Waste Treatment. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. Study of 
the basic physical and chemical processes underlying water and waste treatment, including 
mass transfer, equilibria, and kinetics. Galler 

CE 572 Design of Water and Wastewater Facilities. Preq.: CE 571. 3(3-0) S. Theory and 
design of water and wastewater treatment plants. Smallwood 

CE 573 Unit Operations and Processes in Waste Treatment. Preq.: CE 486; Coreq.: CE 
571. 3(1-6) F. Unit operations and processes in water and wastes engineering, including 
sedimentation, thickening, chemical coagulation, vacuum filtration, carbon adsorption, 
biological treatment, and special projects. Chao, Galler 

CE (NE) 574 Environmental Consequences of Nuclear Power. Preq.: CI. 3(3-0) S. An 
examination of the environmental consequences resulting from the siting, construction and 
operation of nuclear power plants as well as the environmental consequences of alternatives 
to nuclear power. Fuel sources; fuel reprocessing; sources and treatment of solid, liquid, gas- 
eous wastes; the costs of minimizing wastes and the effects of rejected heat; beneficial uses 
of rejected heat; pertinent federal and state regulations are examined. Smallwood 

CE 575 Civil Engineering Systems. Preq.: MA 405. 3(3-0) S. An examination of civil 
engineering systems and their design optimization. The systems to be studied include water 
resources engineering, structural engineering, transportation engineering and construction. 

Galler 

CE 576 Atmospheric Pollution. Preq.: Grad. or advanced undergrad. standing. 3(3-0) S. A 
survey of the problem of atmospheric pollution. Topics to be discussed include: pollutant 
sources; effects on man and other animals, vegetation, materials and visibility; meterological 
factors, air sampling; control devices; air quality and emission standards; and legal, 
economic and administrative aspects. Graduate Staff 

CE (BAE) 578 Agricultural Waste Management. 3(2-3) F. (See biological and 
agricultural engineering, page 64.) 

CE 580 Flow in Open Channels. Preq.: CE 382. 3(3-0) F,S. The theory and applications of 
flow in open channels, including dimensional analysis, momentum-energy principle. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 85 

gradually varied flow, high-velocity flow, energy dissipators, spillways, waves, channel tran- 
sitions and model studies. Amein 

CE (MAS) 581 Introduction to Oceanographic Engineering. Preq.: CE 382. 3(3-0) F. A 
rigorous treatment of the engineering aspects of physical oceanography. The theory for the 
propagation of waves, methods of wave forecasting and the analysis of wave spectra are 
presented. The applications of physical oceanography to the design of marine and coastal in- 
stallations are shown. Amein, Machemehl 

CE 591, 592 Civil Engineering Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Discussions and reports of subjects 
in civil engineering and allied fields. Graduate Staff 

CE 598 Civil Engineering Projects. 1-6 F,S. Special projects in some phase of civil 
engineering. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CE 601 Transportation Planning. Preq.: CE 502. 3(3-0) S. The planning, administration, 
economics and financing of various transportation engineering facilities. Cribbins 

CE 602 Advanced Transportation Design. Preq.: CE 503. 3(2-3) F. Design of major traffic 
and transportation engineering projects. Babcock 

CE 603 Airport Planning and Design. Coreq.: CE 502. 3(2-3) F. The analysis, planning 
and design of air transportation facilities. Cribbins 

CE 604 Urban Transportation Planning. Preq.: CE 502. 3(3-0) S. Planning and design of 
urban transportation systems as related to comprehensive urban planning; principles of land 
use planning, urban thoroughfare planning and regional planning. Babcock, Heimbach 

CE 605 Traffic Flow Theory. Preqs.: CE 502, ST 515. 3(3-0) F. The theoretical techniques 
used to describe vehicular traffic movement on a street or highway network, including the 
use of differential-difference equations, hydrodynamic models, probabilistic models, and 
computer simulation. Heimbach 

CE 611, 612 Unifying Concepts in Mechanics I, II. Preq. PY 503 or CE 511. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Generalized treatment of the fundamental equations and boundary value problems of con- 
tinuous media. Use is made of contemporary developments in irreversible thermodynamics, 
statistical mechanics and electrodynamics to provide a unified foundation for the develop- 
ment of principles governing the dynamic and thermodynamic behavior of elastic, plastic 
and viscoelastic solids, viscous fluids and rheological media. Chang, Horie, McDonald 

CE 613 Theory of Elasticity II. Preq.: CE 513. 3(3-0) S. An extension of CE 513 to include 
the Cauchy Integral methods for plane problems, three-dimensional problems, variational 
methods and the use of numerical methods. Douglas 

CE 614 Plasticity and Limit Analysis. Preq.: CE 513 or 521. 3(3-0) F. Stress-strain rate 
relationships and theorems of limit analysis and shakedown in plastic solids. Application to 
collapse load calculations in arches, rings, plates and axisymmetric shells. Introduction to 
slip-line field theory of plane plastic flow and to dynamic limit analysis. Havner 

CE 615 Inelastic Solids. Preqs.: CE 511 and MA 511. 3(3-0) F. Application of classical con- 
tinuum mechanics to the study of nonlinear and inelastic behavior of solid materials, with 
emphasis on metal plasticity. Constitutive equations for thermo-mechanical behavior of 
crystals and polycrystalline solids at finite strain; analytical connections between 
microscopic and macroscopic behavior. General theorems governing incremental boundary- 
value problems, bifurcation and stability. Considerations of experiment. Havner 



86 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CE 618 Optical Mechanics. Preq.: ESM 312. 3(2-3) S. Concepts of crystal optics applied to 
continua deformed statically or dynamically by mechanical loading; optical interference and 
its use as a measuring technique of absolute and relative retardations in various types of in- 
terferometers; relative retardation measurements; deformation measurements with diffrac- 
tion grating; Moire (mechanical) interference measurements. Bingham 

CE 619 Experimental Methods in Mechanics. Preq.: CI. 3(2-3) S. A study of specialized 
experimental techniques utilized in contemporary research in the areas of mechanics. 

Bingham, Douglas 

CE 620 Numerical Methods in Structural Mechanics. Preqs.: CE 525 and CE 521 or CE 
513. 3(3-0) F. Finite difference and finite element methods in two- and three-dimensional 
elastic structures, including plates, plane stress and plane strain problems, axisymmetric 
solids. Analytical basis of approximations: series expansions; energy theorems; virtual work. 
Matrix decompositions and iteration techniques for digital computer solution. Introduction 
to nonlinear analysis. Havner 

CE 624 Analysis and Design of Structural Shells and Folded Plates. Preqs.: CE 525, CE 
523. 3(3-0) S. Treatment of roof structures in the form of folded and curved surfaces. Mem- 
brane and bending stress analysis of folded plates, shells of revolution, cylindrical and con- 
ical shells and free-form systems. Numerical and closed form solutions. Design criteria for 
concrete and metallic structures. Dean, Havner 

CE 625, 626 Advanced Structural Design I, II. Preqs.: (625): CE 427, CE 525; (626): 
Coreqs.: CE 525, 526. (625) 3(3-0) F. (626) 3(2-3) S. Complete structural design of a variety of 
projects including comparative study of alternative solutions. Discussions of long span struc- 
tural systems. Dean, Uyanik 

CE 627 Analysis and Design of Structures for Dynamic Loads. Preq.: CE 526. 3(3-0) S. 
Response of structural systems to dynamic loads; review of principles of dynamic analysis; 
computation of structural response by numerical methods, nonlinear elastic and inelastic 
response of structures. Vibration of bridges under moving traffic loads. Dynamic effects of 
blast, earthquake and wind loads on structures. Matzen, Tung 

CE 631 Field Analysis of Structural Systems. Preq.: CE 525. 3(3-0) F. Primarily an ex- 
position of the techniques of discrete field mechanics for the analysis of structures. 
Emphasis is on the closed-form analysis of regular structural lattices or nets and ribbed or 
reinforced continuous systems. Additional topics include: a cursory study of special con- 
tinuous field solutions; and open-form solutions for irregular systems. Dean 

CE 632 Probabilistic Methods of Structural Engineering. Preqs.: CE 525 and MA 421. 
3(3-0) F. Application of probability theory and stochastic processes to the study of safety of 
structures. Fundamentals of probability theory and stochastic processes; probabilistic 
modelings of structural loadings, material properties and risk. Reliability analysis of struc- 
tures; reliability-based design criteria. Random vibration of simple structures; safety 
analysis of structures under dynamic loads. Tung 

CE 635 Advanced Theory of Concrete Structures. Preq.: CE 536. 3(3-0) S. Inelastic 
theory of structural concrete members under flexure, axial load, combined flexure and axial 
compression, shear and torsion. Yield line theory of slabs. Limit analysis of beams and 
frames of reinforced and prestressed concrete. Zia 

CE 641, 642 Advanced Soil Mechanics. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) F,S. Theories of soil 
mechanics; failure conditions; mechanical interaction between solids and water, and 
problems in elasticity and plasticity pertaining to earthwork engineering. Wahls 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 87 

CE 644 Ground Water Engineering. Preq.: CE 543 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Ground water 
problems as related to engineering works, ground water circulation and inventories, sub- 
sidence of the ground and its evaluation due to pumping, method of images applied to water 
circulation of wastes and salt water encroachment in coastal aquifers, transient flow 
systems in wells and earth dams and embankments. Leakage problems, practical ground 
water problems and their analysis by computers and electrical models. The legal aspects of 
ground water conservation and the implied technical and engineering phases. Kashef 

CE 646 Dynamics of Soils and Foundations. Preq.: CE 641. 3(3-0) F. The application of 
vibration and wave propagation theories to soil media; the review of existing experimental 
data and empirical procedures for analysis of foundation vibrations, the prediction of soil 
responses to impulse loads, dynamic properties of soils and methods for their determination, 
design procedures for foundation subjected to dynamic forces. Richardson, Wahls 

CE 671 Advanced Water Management Systems. Preq.: CE 484; Coreqs.: CE 571, 573. 4(3- 
3) F. The application of systems analysis methods to the design, analysis and management of 
water and waste systems. Galler 

CE 672 Advanced Water and Waste Treatment: Principles and Design. Preq.: CE 571. 
4(3-3) S. Theory and design of physicochemical processes used to control phosphorus, 
nitrogen, trace metals, and toxic organic substances in water. Galler 

CE 673 Industrial Water Supply and Waste Disposal. Coreq.: CE 571. 3(3-0) F,S. Water 
requirements of industry and the disposal of industries wastes. Smallwood 

CE 674 Stream Sanitation. Coreq.: CE 571. 3(3-0) F,S. Biological, chemical, and 
hydrological factors that affect stream sanitation and stream use. Smallwood 

CE 698 Special Topics in Civil Engineering. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F,S. The study of 
special advanced topics of particular interest in various areas of civil engineering. 

Graduate Staff 

CE 699 Civil Engineering Research. Credits Arranged. F,S. Independent investigation of 
an advanced civil engineering problem; a report of such an investigation is required as a 
graduate thesis. Graduate Staff 



Computer Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. C. Martin, Head 

Professors: W. Chou, L. B. Martin; Associate Professors: D. R. Deuel, R. J. For- 
naro, T. L. Honeycutt, D. F. McAllister, J. D. Powell, W. E. Robbins, A. L. Tharp; 
Assistant Professors: S. D. Danielopoulos, J. W. Hanson, K. Tai, N. F. William- 
son Jr. 

The Department of Computer Science offers a minor program for graduate stu- 
dents majoring in other fields. A student wishing to minor in computer science 
should have a knowledge of a programming language and should anticipate a 
research project involving computers. For a candidate for a master's degree, three 



88 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

courses at the 400 level or above are required, and the student is encouraged to take 
at least one course at the 500 level or above. For a Ph.D. candidate, no specific 
courses are required, but the student is expected to achieve a high level of 
proficiency in at least one of these five areas of computer science: foundations, 
computer systems, numerical processing, programming languages (including com- 
piler design) and information systems. The student's advisory committee, in con- 
junction with the computer science graduate administrator, will assist in selecting 
a meaningful sequence of courses. 

Computer science is an active and leading participant in the Computer Studies 
Program. This master's-level program allows a major emphasis in computer 
science with non-thesis or thesis options. The program's core requirements 
emphasize a cooperative effort between computer science and engineering and 
reflect a narrowing gap between software and hardware. 

Computer science also has established cooperative programs with the Chemical 
Engineering Department and the Operations Research Committee. These 
programs lead to a master's degree in either chemical engineering or operations 
research or a doctoral degree in operations research with emphasis in computer 
science. The requirements for these degrees are satisfied in such a way that a 
strong emphasis is placed on computer science in both course and research work. 

Students admitted to these programs are expected to satisfy all requirements for 
admission to the Graduate School. In addition, they should have a strong 
background in mathematics, statistics or the physical sciences, and a working 
knowledge of a versatile, higher-level programming language, such as ALGOL or 
PL/1. Students lacking necessary background will be required to take courses 
which eliminate the deficiencies in addition to their normal program of study. A 
few research and teaching assistantships are available each year to qualified 
program applicants. 

For additional information regarding computer science programs write: Com- 
puter Science Department, P.O. Box 5972, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

CSC 401 Sorting and Searching. Preq.: CSC 311. 3(3-0) F. 

CSC 405 Introduction to Systems Programs. Preqs.: CSC 202, 256, 311. 3(3-0) F. 

CSC 411 Introduction to Simulation. Preqs.: MA 312 and ST 371 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. 

CSC 412 Introduction to Computability, Language and Automata. Preq.: CSC 322. 3(3- 
0) S. 

CSC 421 Computer Systems for Management. Preq.: CSC 311. 3(3-0) F. 

CSC (MA) 427 Introduction to Numerical Analysis I. Preqs.: MA 301 or MA 312 and 

programming language proficiency. 3(3-0) F. 

CSC (MA) 428 Introduction to Numerical Analysis II. Preqs.: MA 405 and program- 
ming language proficiency. 3(3-0) S. 

CSC 431 Information Retrieval. Preq.: CSC 311. 3(3-0) S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 89 

CSC 432 Introduction to Digital Signal Processing. Preqs.: CSC 302, ST 371 and MA 
405. 3(2-2) S. 

CSC 462 Computing for the Social Sciences. Preq.: ST 311 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. 

CSC 495 Special Topics in Computer Science. Preq.: CI. 1-6 F,S. 

CSC 499 Undergraduate Research in Computer Science. Preq.: CI. 1-6 F,S. 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CSC 501 Design of Systems Programs. Preqs.: CSC 311, 312 (CSC 301 recommended). 
3(3-0) F. Review of batch process systems programs, their components, operating charac- 
teristics, user services and their limitations. Implementation techniques for parallel process- 
ing of input-output and interrupt handling. Overall structure of multiprogramming systems 
on multi-processor hardware configurations. Details on addressing techniques, core manage- 
ment, file system design and management, system accounting, and other user-related ser- 
vices. Traffic control, interprocess communication, design of system modules, and interfaces. 
System updating, documentation and operations. 

CSC 502 Computational Linguistics. Preq.: CI. 3(3-0) S. Use of a symbol manipulation 
language (SNOBOL 4) in solving nonnumeric problems. Study of generative grammars, in- 
cluding finite-state, context-free, context-sensitive, and transformational grammars. Syn- 
tactic analysis by computers: algorithms and existing analysis systems for English. Com- 
putational semantics. Information retrieval and question-answering systems. This course is 
open to computer science students and those in other fields. 

CSC 504 Application of Linguistic Techniques to Computer Problems. Preq.: CSC 502. 
3(3-0) S. Semiotics and programming languages. Comparison of semantic theories. Represen- 
tation, classification and interpretation of scenes and other multi-dimensional illustrations. 
Design of a formal language for describing two-dimensional geometric figures, such as 
flowcharts, chemical structures and logic diagrams. Characterization of programming 
languages according to the theory of transformational grammar. 

CSC 511 Artificial Intelligence. Preq.: CSC 311. 3(3-0) F. Definition of heuristic versus 
algorithmic methods, rationale of heuristic approach, description of cognitive processes. Ob- 
jectives of work in artificial intelligence, simulation of cognitive behavior. Heuristic 
programming techniques. Survey of examples from representative application areas. The 
mind-brain problem and the nature of intelligence. Individual projects to illustrate basic 
concepts. 

CSC 512 Metaprograms. Preq.: CSC 311 (CSC 412 recommended). 3(3-0) S. This course is 
intended to provide a detailed understanding of the techniques used in the design and im- 
plementation of compilers. Introduction to formal grammars and relations concerning a 
grammar. Detailed study of algorithms for lexical scanners, top-down recognizers, bottom- 
up recognizers for simple precedence grammars, operator precedence grammars, high order 
precedence grammars, and bounded-context grammars. Runtime storage organization for a 
compiler including symbol tables, internal forms for source programs, semantic routines, 
error recovery and diagnostics, code generation and optimization, and interpreters. 

CSC 522 Formal Languages and Syntactic Analysis. Preq.: CSC 412 (CSC 512 recom- 
mended). 3(3-0) F. Detailed study of formal languages and their relation to automata: 
languages and their representation, grammars, finite automata and regular grammars, 



90 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

context-free grammars and pushdown automata, type grammars and Turing machines, the 
Halting Problem, context-sensitive grammars and linear bounded automata, and operations 
on languages. 

CSC (MA) 529 Numerical Analysis I. Preqs.: MA 405, MA 511 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. 
Theory of interpolation, numerical integration, iterative solution of non-linear equations, 
numerical integration of ordinary differential equations, matrix inversion and solution of 
simultaneous linear equations. 

CSC (MA) 530 Numerical Analysis II. Preq.: CSC (MA) 529. 3(3-0) S. Least squares data 
approximation, expansions in terms of orthogonal functions. Gaussian quadrature, 
economization of series, minimax approximations, Pade's approximation, eigenvalues of 
matrices. 

CSC 532 Artificial Intelligence II. Preqs.: CSC 511, course in mathematical logic. 3(3-0) 
S. A rigorous approach to artificial intelligence emphasizing pattern recognition, theorem 
proving, game playing, learning and heuristic programming. Students will be assigned com- 
puter projects illustrating theoretical concepts introduced in lecture. 

CSC (MA) 536 Theory of Sequential Machines. Preq.: CSC 412 or grad. standing. 3(3-0) 
F. Sequential machine identification experiments. Finite-Memory machines. Special classes 
of machines. Decomposition of sequential machines. Linear sequential machines. Sequential 
relations of finite-state machines. 

CSC (MA) 537 Theory of Computatility. Preq.: CSC 412 or grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. The 
concept of effective computability. Turing machines. Primitive recursive functions. The a- 
operator. (^-recursive functions. Godel numbering. Equivalence of Turing machines and u- 
recursion. Undecidable predicates. Universal Turing machines. Other formulations of the 
concept of effective computability. 

CSC 542 Database Management. Preq.: CSC 431. 3(3-0) F. The course will cover the fun- 
damentals of the area of database management. Basic topics will include: General architec- 
ture for database management systems; current data models such as network, relational, 
hierarchical; security and integrity; discussion of current implemented systems. 

CSC (OR, IE) 562 Advanced Topics in Computer Simulation. Preqs.: ST 421 or 
equivalent; or grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. Basic simulation methodology; general principles of 
the Monte Carlo method: random number generation, accuracy, variance reduction methods, 
classicial applications in mathematics and physics; simulation of queueing systems; develop- 
ment of a research problem in depth where computer simulation is required 1) to provide in- 
sight through experimentation with a model, 2) to provide approximate answers and prac- 
tical solutions, and 3) to test the model and the solutions. 

CSC (MA) 582 Special Topics in Numerical Solution of Linear Algebraic Equations. 

Preqs.: MA 405 or equivalent and a knowledge of computer programming. 3(3-0) S. A 
mathematical and numerical investigation of direct iterative and semi-iterative methods for 
the solution of linear systems. Methods for the calculation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of 
matrices. 

CSC (MA) 583 Special Topics in the Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential 
Equations. Preq.: Knowledge to the level of CSC 427. 3(3-0) S. Numerical methods for initial 
value problem including predictor-corrector, Runge-Kutta, hybrid and extrapolation 
methods; stiff systems; shooting methods for two-point boundary value problems; weak, ab- 
solute and relative stability results. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 91 

CSC (MA) 584 Special Topics in the Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equa- 
tions. Preq.: Knowledge to the level of CSC 427-428. 3(3-0) F. Numerical methods for the 
solutions of parabolic, elliptic, and hyperbolic partial differential equations including 
stability and convergence results. 

CSC (OR) 585 Graph Theory. Preq.: MA 405. 3(3-0) F. Basic concepts of graph theory. 
Trees and forests. Vector spaces associated with a graph. Representation of graphs by binary 
matrices and list structures. Traversability. Connectivity. Matching and assignment 
problems. Planar graphs. Colorability. Directed graphs. Applications of graph theory with 
emphasis on organizing problems in a form suitable for computer solution. 

CSC 595 Special Topics. Preq.: CI. 1-6 F,S. Topics of current interest in computer science 
not covered in existing courses. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CSC 603 Computational Semantics. Preqs.: CSC 502, course in mathematical logic. 3(3-0) 
F. Theoretical prerequisites and computational techniques for the mechanical interpretation 
of artificial and natural language sentences. Semantics of formal languages. Structural 
representations of meaning. Semantics of natural languages. 

CSC (OR) 605 Large Scale Linear Programming Systems. 3(3-0) S. (See operations 
research, page 203.) 

CSC (MA) 635 Functional Analysis and Numerical Analysis. Preqs.: MA 516, MA 
(CSC) 530. 3(3-0) S. This course generalizes on the basic procedures of classical numerical 
analysis by the application of the abstractions of functional analysis. Course begins with 
review of functional analysis, followed by applications of functional analysis to the solution 
of numerical problems in the area of optimization, integral and differential equations, 
systems of linear and nonlinear equations. Functional approximation will be studied. 



Computer Studies 

Professor Wushow Chou, Program Director 

For a listing of graduate faculty, refer to the computer studies brochure 
available at the office of the Computer Studies Program. 

The computer studies program is an interdisciplinary graduate program which is 
administratively supported by the Departments of Computer Science and Elec- 
trical Engineering, with participation by faculty members primarily from com- 
puter science, electrical engineering, and operations research. 

The program integrates the computer software oriented curriculum of the 
Department of Computer Science and the computer hardware oriented curriculum 
from the Department of Electrical Engineering into a single curriculum. This is in 
contrast to the traditional arrangement in which the curriculum in an independent 
computer science department emphasizes software systems and computing theory 
while the computer engineering curriculum in an electrical engineering depart- 
ment emphasizes hardware systems. The need for the merging of these two types 
of curricula has been recognized by several other schools through cross-listed 



92 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

courses and joint degree programs. North Carolina State University takes a more 
positive step by creating a single administrative unit to incorporate the curricula at 
the graduate level. 

The curricula in the program also provide a formal link to that of operations 
research. This is important since graduate research in the many software systems 
and computing theory topics often make use of operations research techniques. 

Although courses and thesis topics may be chosen in a variety of fields, this 
program's unique strength lies with the fields combining computer science and 
computer engineering, and the fields combining computer science and operations 
research. These fields include: computer system architecture and design, computer 
communications, and large scale systems. 

The field of computer system architecture and design deals with the specifica- 
tion, design and analysis of digital systems, including the study of system architec- 
ture, design algorithms and automation, fault tolerant design and simulation. The 
field of computer communications deals with the methodology of utilizing the 
state-of-the-art capability of computers and telecommunications for reliable, 
economic, and the responsive transfer of digitized information among data 
transmission equipment, which may be various computers, terminals, or 
telephones with digitized voices. The field of large scale systems is concerned with 
the study of the structure and properties of systems with large numbers of inter- 
dependent variables, and with the methodology and application of numerical 
analysis, dynamical systems theory and systems analysis, and mathematical 
programming of such systems. 

For students pursuing a master's degree in computer studies, there are two op- 
tions: the thesis option, the Master of Science in computer studies, and the non- 
thesis option, the Master of Computer Studies. 

Remedial Courses 

The immigration modules are the remedial courses that are structured primarily 
for students with a bachelor's degree in one of the quantitative sciences, but with 
little computer background. However, proficiency in a high-level programming 
language is assumed. Each module provides in a condensed format the prerequisite 
knowledge for most first year graduate courses in the program. Each entering stu- 
dent would select, upon advice of the program faculty, only those immigration 
modules necessary to eliminate deficiencies relevant to his program of study. 
Credit toward satisfying degree requirements for computer studies majors would 
not be allowed for the immigration modules. 

Core Courses 

Two core courses, Design and Analysis of Algorithms and Advanced Topics in 
Computer Organization, are intended to provide a thorough basic knowledge upon 
which the elective courses may be built. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 93 

Elective Courses 

The elective courses are classified according to their subject areas. For a listing 
of these courses, refer to the computer studies brochure. 



Crop Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor B. E. Caldwell, Head 

Professors: D. S. Chamblee, W. K. Collins, D. A. Emery— Coordinator, Graduate 
Programs, W. T. Fike, D. U. Gerstel, W. B. Gilbert, W. C. Gregory, H. D. Gross, 
G. L. Jones—//? Charge, Crop Science Extension, K. R. Keller, W. M. Lewis, T. J. 
Mann, L. L. Phillips, T. J. Sheets, D. H. Timothy, J. B. Weber, E. A. Wernsman, 
J. A. Weybrew, A. D. Worsham; Extension Professor: C. T. Blake; Professors 
USDA: C. A. Brim, J. C. Burns, T. H. Busbice, J. F. Chaplin, W. A. Cope, J. A. 
Lee, D. E. Moreland, D. L. Thompson; Professors Emeriti: P. H. Harvey, G. K. 
Middleton, R. P. Moore; Associate Professors: H. D. Coble, F. T. Corbin, R. C. 
Long, C. F. Murphy, R. P. Patterson, E. C. Sisler, G. A. Sullivan, W. W. Weeks; 
ExtensioJi Associate Professor: E. L. Kimbrough; Associate Professor USDA: G. 
R. Gwynn; Assistant Professors: E. J. Dunphy, E. G. Krenzer, J. C. Wynne; 
Assistant Professors USDA: J. W. Burton, R. F. Wilson 

The Department of Crop Science offers instruction leading to the Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in the fields of plant breeding, crop 
production and physiology, forage crops ecology, weed control and plant chemistry. 
For students who wish general training, the Master of Agriculture is offered. 

Excellent facilities for graduate training are available. Many special facilities 
such as preparation rooms for plant and soil samples, cold storage facilities for 
plant material, greenhouse space, growth control chambers, and access to the plant 
environment laboratories (Phytotron) are provided if required. Sixteen farms are 
owned and operated by the State for research investigations. Research farms are 
located throughout North Carolina and include a variety of soil and climatic condi- 
tions needed for experiments in plant breeding, crop management, forage ecology, 
and weed control. 

Strong supporting departments increase opportunities for broad and thorough 
training. Among the departments in which graduate students in crop science work 
cooperatively or obtain instruction are: Botany, Chemistry, Entomology, Hor- 
ticultural Science, Genetics, Mathematics, Microbiology, Plant Pathology, Soil 
Science, and Statistics. 

In North Carolina, a state which derives 60 to 65 percent of its agricultural in- 
come from farm crops, the opportunities for the well-trained agronomist are great. 
Recipients of advanced degrees in crop science at North Carolina State University 



94 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

are found in positions of leadership in research and education throughout the na- 
tion and the world. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

CS (BO) 402 Economic Botany. Preq.: BO 200. 3(2-3) S. 

CS 411 Environmental Aspects of Crop Production. Preq.: BO 421. 2(2-0) F. 

CS 413 Plant Breeding. Preq.: GN 411. 2(2-0) S. 

CS 414 Weed Science. Preq.: CH 220. 4(3-2) F. 

CS (SSC) 462 Soil-Crop Management Systems. Preqs.: CS 211, CS 414, SSC 341, SSC 352. 
3(2-3) S. 

CS 490 Senior Seminar in Crop Science. Preq.: Sr. in crop science or related field. 1(0-1) S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CS 511 Tobacco Technology. Preq.: BO 421 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. A study of special 
problems concerned with the tobacco crop. The latest research problems and findings dealing 
with this important cash crop will be discussed. Collins 

CS 513 Physiological Aspects of Crop Production. Preq.: BO 421. 3(3-0) S. Discussion 
will emphasize pertinent physiological processes associated with crops and crop management 
such as plant growth, maturation, respiration and photoperiodism. Relationship of the en- 
vironment to maximum crop vields will be discussed. (Offered in S 1980 and alt. vears.) 

Fike 

CS (HS) 514 Principles and Methods in Weed Science. Preq.: CS 414 or equivalent. 3(2- 
2) S. Studies of the losses caused by the ecology of weeds, biological control basic concepts of 
weed management, herbicide-crop relationships and herbicide development. Introduction to 
greenhouse and bioassay techniques and field research techniques. Monaco 

CS (GN, HS) 541 Plant Breeding Methods. Preqs. GN 506, ST 511. 3(3-0) F. An ad- 
vanced study of methods of plant breeding as related to principles and concepts of 
inheritance. Henderson, Wynne 

CS (GN, HS) 542 PLant Breeding Field Procedures. Preq.: CS (GN, HS) 541. 2(0-4) Sum. 
Laboratory and field study of the application of the various plant breeding techniques and 
methods used in the improvement of economic plants. (Offered in Sum. by arrangement.) 

Graduate Staff 

CS (GN) 545 Origin and Evolution of Cultivated Plants. Preq.: CS (GN, HS) 541 or GN 
(ZO) 540. 2(2-0) S. Discussion topics include: mankind as a potential cultivator; man's 
anatomy, physiology and alimentary needs; origins of cultivation; spread of agriculture in 
terms of various theories; interactions of crops and environments with reference to crop 
evolution; special attributes of cultigens; modern aspects of evolution (breeding). (Offered S 
1980 and alt. years.) Lee 

CS 591 Special Problems. Preq.: CI. Credits Arranged. Special problems in various 
phases of crop science. Problems may be selected or will be assigned. Emphasis will be placed 
on review of recent and current research. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 95 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY* 



CS (GN, HS) 613 Plant Breeding Theory. Preqs.: CS (GN, HS) 541, GN 506, ST 512. 3(3-0) 
S. A study of theoretical bases for plant breeding procedures with special emphasis on the 
relationship between type and source of genetic variability, mode of reproduction and effec- 
tiveness of different selection procedures. The latest experimental approaches to plant 
breeding will be discussed as well as standard procedures. (Offered in S 1980 and alt. years.) 

Wernsman 

CS (HS, SSC) 614 Herbicide Behavior in Plants and Soils. Preqs.: BO 551 and CH 223 or 

CI. 3(3-0) F. The chemical and physiological processes involved in the behavior of herbicides 
in plants and soils will be examined. Topics to be discussed include absorption, translocation, 
metabolism and mechanisms of action of herbicides on plants; reactions, movement and 
degradation of herbicides in the soil; and interactions among herbicides and other pesticides. 
(Offered F 1979 and alt. years.) Weber 

CS 690 Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) F,S. A maximum of two credits is allowed 
toward the master's degree; however, additional credits toward the doctorate are allowed. 
Scientific articles, progress reports in research and special problems of interest to 
agronomists are reviewed and discussed. Graduate Staff 

CS 699 Research. Preq.: Grad. standing. Credits Arranged. A maximum of six credits is 
allowed toward the master's degree, but no restrictions toward the doctorate. 

Graduate Staff 

Curriculum and Instruction 



For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, See education 
page 105. 

Design 

For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see architecture, 
page 58. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

DN 411 Advanced Visual Laboratory. Preqs.: DF 102, soph, standing. 2-4 F,S. 

DN 413 Geometry for Designers. Preq.: DF 102. 3(2-3) F,S. 

DN 414 Color and Light Laboratory. Preq.: DF 102. 3(2-2) F.S. 

DN 415 Visual Design Materials and Processes I. Preq.: DF 102. 3(2-2) F. 

DN 416 Visual Design Materials and Processes II. Preq.: DF 102. 3(2-2) S. 

DN 421 Environmental Cognition for Designers. Preqs.: DN 221/231 or DN 222. 3(3-0) F. 



* Students are expected to consult with the instructor before registration. 



96 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

DN 423 Spatial Cognition for Designers. Preqs.: DN 221/231 or DN 222. 3(3-0) F. 

DN 424 Social Factors Analysis in Design. Preqs.: DN 221/231 or DN 222. 3(2-4) S. 

DN 430 Site Planning. Preqs.: DN 221/231 or DN 232 and GY 120/110 or GY 101/110 or 
SSC 205. 3(2-2) F,S. 

DN 431 Natural Environment Analysis. Preqs.: DN 221/231 or DN 232. 3(3-0) F. 

DN 432 Environmental Assessment and Design Field Workshop. Preqs.: DN 221/231 or 
DN 232. 3 Sum. 

DN 441 Origins and Development of Contemporary Architecture. Preqs.: DN 141, 142 
for Design students only; others, Jr. standing. 3(3-0) F,S. 

DN 443 Landscape History: From the Ice Age to the Present. Preqs.: DN 141, 142. 3(3-0) 
F. 

DN 444 History of Landscape Architecture. Preqs.: DN 141, 142. 3(3-0) F. 

DN 447 Architecture History Seminar. Preqs.: DN 141, 142. 3(3-0) F,S. 

DN 451 Illumination. Preq.: DN 253. 3(1-4) S. 

DN 452 Climate Control Systems and Design. Preq.: DN 253. 3(1-4) F. 

DN 453 The Systems Approach to Building. Preq.: DN 254. 3(3-0) S. 

DN 462 Predictive Techniques, Predesign Methods, and Programming. Preq.: DN 261. 

3(3-0) S. 

DN 491 Special Seminar in Design. 1-3 F,S. 

DN 492 Special Topics in Design. 1-3 F,S. 

DN 493 Mini-Course in Design. 1-2 F,S. 

DN 494 Internship in Design. Preqs.: Jr. standing, approval of program director. 3-6 
(Max. 6) F,S. 

DN 495 Independent Study in Design. Preq.: Jr. standing, approval of program director 
and core chairman. 1-3 (Max. 6) F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

DN 511, 512 Advanced Visual Laboratory V, VI. Preq.: Grad. standing. 2-4 F,S. Ad- 
vanced experimental studies in visual phenomena related to design. 

DN 541 Seminar on Ideas in Design. Preq.: Grad. standing. 2-3 F,S. An examination of 
aesthetics and the relationships of philosophic thought to design. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

DN 611, 612 Advanced Visual Laboratory VII, VIII. Preq.: Grad. standing. 2(0-6) F.S. 
Advanced experimental studies in visual phenomena related to design. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 97 

DN 698 Design Research and Service Learning Projects. Preqs.: Grad. standing, con- 
sent of Program director and graduate committee. 2-6 F.S.Sum. Problems relevant to design 
will provide the subjects for graduate study based upon research, service learning projects, 
on- and off-campus internships, and individual investigations will be under the direction of 
faculty advisors. 



Ecology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professors: R. C. Axtell, F. S. Barkalow, K. R. Barker, S. W. Buol, J. C. Burns 
(USDA), D. S. Chamblee, A. W. Cooper, B. J. Copeland, G. H. Elkan, L. F. Grand, 
H. D. Gross, J. W. Hardin, D. W. Hayne, B. S. Martof, J. J. Perry, T. 0. Perry, T. 
L. Quay, R. L. Rabb, D. H. Timothy, H. R. van der Vaart, A. G. Wollum II, A. D. 
Worsham; Associate Professors: G. T. Barthalmus. U. Blum, J. R. Bradley Jr., 
E. D. Seneca, R. E. Stinner; Assistant Professors: D. M. Benson, P. D. Doerr, J. 
M. Miller, J. F. Reynolds, T. R. Wentworth. 

Ecology is the science concerned with the interactions of organisms with each 
other and with their environment. It is an integrative science through which one 
gains an understanding of biological and physical interrelationships and predicts 
the consequences of altering one or several components of an ecosystem. 

Students in a number of basic and applied curricula may elect to major in 
ecology at the master's level leading to an M.S. degree or minor in ecology at the 
master's and Ph.D. levels. The minor provides an opportunity for a coherent pic- 
ture of the field of ecology but does not usurp the normal prerogatives of graduate 
advisory committees in structuring graduate programs. 

The ecology minor is an interdepartmental program drawing faculty from the 
botany, crop science, entomology, forestry, microbiology, plant pathology, soil 
science, statistics and zoology 7 departments. The program is administered by the 
Ecology Advisory Committee. Additional information about the program may be 
obtained by writing to one of the faculty members listed above or to Chairman, 
Ecology Faculty, P. 0. Box 5186, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North 
Carolina 27607. 

The following courses are recognized as ecological and have been grouped into 
certain related areas. (For course descriptions see respective departmental 
listings.) 

General Ecology: BO (ZO) 560 Principles of Ecology; BO 565 Plant Community Ecology; 

BO (ZO) 660 Advanced Topics in Ecology I; ZO (BO) 661 Advanced Topics in Ecology 

II. 
Population Ecology: ZO 517 Population Ecology; ENT 531 Insect Ecology; GN (ZO) 550 

Experimental Evolution. 

Limnology and Marine Science: ZO 519 Limnology'; ZO (MAS) 529 Biological Ocean- 
ography; ZO 619 Advanced Limnology'. 



98 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Behavior: ZO 501 Ornithology; ZO 510 Adaptive Behavior of Animals; ZO 610 Current 
Aspects of Animal Behavior. 

Microbial Ecology: MB 501 Advanced Microbiology; SSC (MB) 532 Soil Microbiology; PP 
611 Advanced Plant Nematology; PP (BO) 625 Advanced Mycology; SSC (MB) 632 
Ecology and Functions of Soil Microorganisms. 

Terrestrial Ecology: BO 544 Plant Geography; ZO 544 Mammalogy; SSC 551 Soil 
Morphology, Genesis and Classification; MY 555 Meteorology of the Biosphere; BO 662 
Applied Coastal Ecology. 

Physiological Ecology: ZO (PHY) 513 Comparative Physiology; ZO 515 Growth and 
Reproduction of Fishes; BO 561 Physiological Ecology. 

Mathematical Biology and Ecology: ZO 553 Principles of Wildlife Science; BO 570 Quan- 
titative Ecology; BMA (MA, ST) 571, 572 Biomathematics I, II. 

Applied Ecology: CS 411 Environmental Aspects of Crop Production; ZO 420 Fishery 
Science; ZO 441 Ichthyology; FOR 452 Silvics; FOR 472 Renewable Resource Manage- 
ment; SSC 472 Forest Soil; FOR 501 Forest Influences and Watershed Management; HS 
(CS) 514 Principles and Methods in Weed Science; ENT 550 Fundamentals of Insect Con- 
trol; ZO 554 Wildlife Field Studies; ENT 562 Agricultural Entomology; ENT (ZO) 582 
Medical and Veterinary Entomology; FOR 613 Special Topics in Silviculture; FOR 614 
Advanced Topics in Forest Land Management; ZO 621 Fishery Science. 

The requirements for a major in Ecology are: 

Master of Science Degree: Six courses including BO (ZO) 560 (or its equivalent), either BO 
565, BO (ZO) 660 or 661, ST 511, ECO 690, and one course from each of two designated 
areas (population, ecology, limnology and marine science, etc.). The latter two courses 
should not be in same department as the major professor. 



The requirements for a minor in Ecology are: 



Master of Science Degree: Three ecological courses, including BO (ZO) 560 (or its 
equivalent) and either BO 565, BO (ZO) 660 or BO (ZO) 661. The third course should not be 
in the same department as the major. 

Ph.D. Degree: Four ecological courses, including BO (ZO) 560 (or its equivalent) and at 
least one other course from the general ecology area. One course outside the general 
ecology area is required. If more than one course is taken from outside the general ecology 
area, these courses must come from different designated areas (i.e., population ecology, 
limnology and marine science, etc.). Courses outside of the general ecology area should not 
be from the same department as the major. 

Incoming students may apply equivalent courses toward these requirements at 
the discretion of their graduate committee. Students minoring in ecology, par- 
ticularly at the Ph.D. level, are encouraged to take courses in mathematics and 
statistics, at least ST 511 and ST 512. 

ECO 690 Ecology Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) F. Scientific articles, progress 
reports and special problems of interest to ecologists are reviewed and discussed. Minimum 
of one seminar presentation required for credit. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 99 

ECO 693 Special Problems in Ecology. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-6 F.S.Sum. Investigation 
of special problems in ecology of particular interest to advanced students under the direction 
of a faculty member. Directed research in some specialized phase of ecology other than a 
thesis problem, but designed to provide experience and training in research. 



Economics and Business 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor W. D. Toussaint, Head 

Professors: A. J. Coutu, E. W. Erickson, R. M. Fearn, D. M. Hoover— Assistant 
Head of the Departynent, L. A. Ihnen, P. R. Johnson, E. W. Jones, R. A. King, G. 

A. Mathia, B. M. Olsen — Assistant Department Head, E. C. Pasour Jr., R. J. 
Peeler, R. K. Perrin, R. A. Schrimper, J. A. Seagraves, R. L. Simmons, R. E. 
Sylla, C. B. Turner, J. C. Williamson Jr.; Extension Professors: R. C. Brooks, H. 
L. Liner, T. E. Nichols Jr., C. R. Pugh, R. C. Wells— Assistant Head of the 
Department: Professor Emeritus: E. W. Swanson; USDA Professor Emeritus: J. 
G. Sutherland; Associate Professors: D. S. Ball, G. A. Carlson, J. S. Chappell, W. 
D. Cooper, L. E. Danielson, M. M. El-Kammash, A. R. Gallant, C. W. Harrell Jr., 
D. L. Holley, D. M. Holthausen Jr., D. N. Hyman, T. Johnson, C. P. Jones, F. A. 
Mangum Jr., C. J. Messere, J. C. Poindexter Jr.; Extension Associate Professor: 
R. D. Dahle; USDA Associate Professor: H. C. Gilliam Jr.; Assistant Professors: 
R. L. Clark, D. J. Flath, T. J. Grennes, C. R. Knoeber, J. S. Lapp, M. P. Loeb, M. 

B. McElroy, G. M. Scobie, W. J. Wessels; Visiting Assistant Professor: L. E. 
Abbas 

The Department of Economics and Business offers programs of study leading to 
the Master of Economics, the Master of Arts in economics, the Master of Science in 
agricultural economics, the Master of Science in management (in conjunction with 
other departments) and the Ph.D. degree in economics. Emphasis is placed on 
economic theory and quantitative economic analysis and their application to 
economic problems. Special seminars and workshops are available to students as a 
means of pursuing topics of special interest. 

Master's programs require a minimum of 30 semester hours. A semester each of 
intermediate undergraduate micro and macro theory in addition to basic calculus 
are minimum prerequisites. Within the 30 hours, a nine-hour minor is required in 
some discipline outside the department. No foreign language is required. The 
Master of Arts and Master of Science degrees require a thesis which receives up to 
six hours of credit toward the degree. The Master of Economics has no thesis re- 
quirement. Included in the programs available for students pursuing the Master of 
Economics degree are several management options. These may be adapted for 
those who are interested in training in quantitative marketing, public sector 
management, personnel management, and management science. 

The Ph.D. program has no specific hour requirements; however, at least six 
semesters of work beyond the bachelor's degree are required, of which at least two 



100 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

consecutive semesters must be in residence. Candidates take course work and writ- 
ten examinations in economic theory and a minor of their choice. In addition, each 
student chooses a field of study within the department (e.g., agricultural 
economics, economic development, econometrics, international trade, labor 
economics and human resources, or managerial economics). A minimum of two 
semesters of statistics and differential and integral calculus is required of all Ph.D. 
candidates. There is no foreign language requirement for the Ph.D. Specific 
programs are designed to meet individual interests and professional objectives. 
A well-equipped departmental library, the D. H. Hill Library and library 
facilities of two nearby major universities are readily available for graduate stu- 
dent use. Graduate students on financial support are provided office space. Com- 
putational facilities are available for students whose research involves extensive 
analysis of data and to students interested in learning to use computer facilities. 
The department has a specially-trained clerical and programming staff. Students 
have access from several terminals on campus to an IBM 370/165 operated by the 
Triangle Universities Computing Center. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

EB 401 Economic Analysis for Nonmajors. Preq.: EB 201 or 212. 3(3-0) F,S. 

EB 410 Public Finance. Preq.: EB 301. 3(3-0) F. 

EB 413 Competition, Monopoly and Public Policy. Preq.: EB 301. 3(3-0) S. 

EB 415 Farm Appraisal and Finance. Preq.: EB 303 or 310. 3(2-2) F. 

EB 420 Corporation Finance. Preqs.: EB 201 or 212 and ACC 260. 3(3-0) F,S. 

EB 422 Investments and Portfolio Management. Preqs.: EB 201 and 350 or ST 311. 3(3-0) 
F,S. 

EB 430 Agricultural Price Analysis. Preq.: EB 301. 3(3-0) F. 

EB 431 Labor Economics. Preq.: EB 301. 3(3-0) F,S. 

EB 435 Urban Economics. Preq.: EB 301. 3(3-0) S. 

EB 436 Environmental Economics. Preq.: EB 301. 3(3-0) S. 

EB 442 Evolution of Economic Ideas. Preq.: EB 202 or 212. 3(3-0) F. 

EB 448 International Economics. Preq.: EB 301. 3(3-0) F,S. 

EB 451 Introduction to Econometrics. Preqs.: EB 301, 302, 350 or ST 311. 3(3-0) F. 

EB 475 Comparative Economic Systems. Preq.: EB 201 or 212. 3(3-0) F.S. 

EB (TX) 482 Sales Management for Textiles. Preq.: TX 380. 3(3-0) F,S. 

EB 490, 491 Senior Seminars in Economics. Preqs.: EB 301, 302 and 350 or ST 311 (plus 
two courses from list of restricted EB electives.). 3(3-0) F,S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 101 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

EB 501 Price Theory. Preqs.: MA 112 and EB 301. 3(3-0) F,S. An intensive analysis of the 
determination of prices and of market behavior, including demand, cost and production, pric- 
ing under competitive conditions and pricing under monopoly and other imperfectly com- 
petitive conditions. Graduate Staff 

EB 502 Income and Employment Theory. Preqs.: MA 112, EB 301 and 302. 3(3-0) F,S. A 
study of the methods and concepts of national income analysis with particular reference to 
the role of fiscal and monetary policy in pursuit of full employment without inflation. 

Graduate Staff 

EB (RRA) 503 Economics of Recreation. 3(3-0) F. (See recreation resources administra- 
tion, page 235.) 

EB 515 Water Resources Economics. Preq.: EB 401 recommended. 3(3-0) F. The applica- 
tion of economic principles to the allocation of water resources. Attention to how to effect 
maximum economic efficiency in the use of a resource that is no longer a free good, under the 
consideration of the goals of the public and private sectors of the enterprise economy. Both 
economic and political consequences of decision-making are studied. Seagraves 

EB 520 The Theory of Finance. Preq.: EB 301 or 401. 3(3-0) S. An analysis of the current 
state of the related financial areas of portfolio theory, the theory of capital markets, and the 
theory of firm finance. Emphasis is placed upon the optimum financial choice by both the 
firm and the individual. Basic topics include decision making under uncertainty, firm invest- 
ment and financing decisions, portfolio theory and analysis, capital asset pricing models, and 
the theory of capital market equilibrium. Jones 

EB 521 Markets and Trade. Preq.: EB 301 or 401. 3(3-0) F. This course emphasizes the 
space, form and time dimensions of market price and the location and produce combination 
decisions of firms. Consideration is given to the way in which non-price factors and public 
policy choices influence firm behavior and the efficiency of marketing systems. Application 
of these models to agricultural, industrial and public service questions is emphasized, in- 
cluding the relationships between resource availability and the spatial arrangement of 
economic activity. King 

EB 523 Planning Farm and Area Adjustments. Preq.: EB 301, 303 or 401. 3(2-2) S. The 
application of economic principles to production problems on typical farms in the state; 
methods and techniques of economic analysis of the farm business; application of research 
findings to production decisions; development of area agricultural programs. Liner 

EB 525 Management Policy and Decision Making. Preq.: EB 301 or 401. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Modern management processes used in making top-level policies and decisions. An evalua- 
tion of economic, social and institutional pressures, and of the economic and noneconomic 
motivations, which impinge upon the individual and the organization. The problem of co- 
ordinating the objectives and the mechanics of management is examined. Erickson 

EB 532 Economics of Trade Unions. Preq.: EB 301 or EB 401. 3(3-0) F. An examination of 
the growth of the trade union movement in the United States. Primary consideration is given 
to the impact of unions on the economy through their influence on wages, prices, employ- 
ment and resource allocation. Other topics include the relationship between the government 
and unions, the changing compensation mix, and the recent growth in public employee 
unionism. Clark 

EB 533 Agricultural Policy. Preq.: EB 301 or 401. 3(3-0) S. A review of the agricultural 
policy and action programs of the federal government affecting both input supply and com- 



102 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

modities. An analysis of objectives, principal means and observable results on resource use 
and income distribution within agriculture, and between agriculture and the rest of the 
economy. An appraisal of the effects alternative policy proposals would have on domestic 
and foreign consumption. Mangum 

EB 535 Social Science Concepts in Managerial Processes. Preq.: Six hours in 
economics. 3(3-0) S. Interrelationships between concepts from economics and from other 
social sciences in managerial processes of clarifying goals, discovering alternatives and 
choosing courses of action. Cases are used to provide opportunities to compare contributions 
of theoretical concepts from economics, political science, social psychology, sociology and 
management science to managerial processes. Theoretical concepts are drawn from readings 
in the various disciplines. Graduate Staff 

EB 540 Economic Development. Preq.: EB 301 or 401. 3(3-0) F. An examination of the 
problems encountered in promoting regional and national economic development. Considera- 
tion is given to the structural changes required for raising standards of living. Some basic 
principles of economics are applied to suggest ways of achieving development goals. Topics 
include planning strategies, policies and external assistance. Olsen 

EB 550 Mathematical Models in Economics. Preqs.: EB 301, 302, MA 212 and 405 recom- 
mended but not required. 3(3-0) F. An introductory study of economic models emphasizing 
their formal properties. The theory of individual economic units is presented as a special case 
in the theory of inductive behavior. Mathematical discussions of the theory of the consumer, 
the theory of the firm and welfare economics will show the relevance of such topics as con- 
strained maxima and minima, set theory, partially and simply ordered systems, probability 
theory and game theory to economics. El-Kammash 

EB 551 Agricultural Production Economics. Preqs.: MA 112 and EB 301 or EB 401. 3(3-0) 
F. An economic analysis of agricultural production including: production functions, cost 
functions, programming and decision-making principles. Applications of these principles to 
farm and regional resources allocation, and to the distribution of income to and within 
agriculture. Perrin 

EB 555 Linear Programming. Preqs.: MA 231 or 405 and EB 301 or 401. 3(3-0) F.S. Recent 
developments in the theory of production, allocation and organization. Optimal combination 
of integrated productive processes within the firm. Applications in the economics of industry 
and of agriculture. Harrell 

EB (ST) 561 Intermediate Econometrics. Preqs.: EB 501 and ST 513. 3(3-0) S. The for- 
malization of economic hypotheses into testable relationships and the application of ap- 
propriate statistical techniques will be emphasized. Major attention will be given to 
procedures applicable for single equation stochastic models expressing microeconomic and 
macroeconomic relationships. Statistical considerations that are relevant in working with 
time series and cross sectional data in economic investigations will be covered. Survey of 
simultaneous equation models and the available estimation techniques. T. Johnson 

EB 570 Analysis of American Economic History. Preq.: EB (HI) 371 or grad. standing. 
3(3-0) S. Stresses the application of economic analysis to the formulation and testing of 
hypotheses concerning economic growth and development in the historical context. Problems 
selected for analysis will be drawn primarily from American economic history. Sylla 

EB (SOC) 574 The Economics of Population. Preq.: EB 301 or 401. 3(3-0) S. A review of 
population theories from the pre-Malthusian to the contemporary. An introduction to 
demographic data sources and analysis. Microeconomic models of fertility are intensively 
treated, and macroeconomic demographic models also are examined. The public policy im- 
plications of these models are developed. Discussions include underpopulation, overpopula- 
tion, optimum growth rate and incentive schemes. El-Kammash 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 103 

EB (TX) 585 Market Research in Textiles. 3(3-0) S. (See textile materials and manage- 
ment, page 258.) 

EB 590 Special Economics Topics. Preq.: CI. Maximum 6. An examination of current 
problems on a lecture-discussion basis. Course content will vary as changing conditions re- 
quire new approaches to deal with emerging problems. Graduate Staff 

EB 598 Topical Problems in Economics. Preq.: CI. 1-6. An investigation of topics of par- 
ticular interest to advanced students under faculty direction on a tutorial basis. Credits and 
content vary with student needs. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

EB 600 Advanced Price Theory- Preqs.: EB 501, MA 212. 3(3-0) F. Alternative economic 
organizations and the role of prices; equilibrium and price determination in a market 
economy; theory of consumer behavior, derivation of individual demand curves and aggrega- 
tion to market supply curves; demand for factors of production. Graduate Staff 

EB 601 Prices, Value and Welfare. Preq.: EB 600. 3(3-0) S. The supply of factors of 
production; alternative nonmonetary theories of capital and interest; productivity; income 
distribution; determinants of firm size; the nature of market organization; welfare 
economics topics, including externalities, compensation, social welfare function and con- 
sumer surplus. Graduate Staff 

EB 602 Advanced Income and Employment Theory. Preq.: EB 502. 3(3-0) F. An analysis 
of the forces determining the level of income and employment; a review of some of the 
theories of economic fluctuations; and a critical examination of a selected macroeconomic 
system. Graduate Staff 

EB 603 History of Economic Thought. Preqs.: EB 501 and 502 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. A 
systematic analysis of the development and cumulation of economic thought, designed in 
part to provide a sharper focus and more adequate perspective for the understanding of con- 
temporary economics. Turner 

EB 604 Monetary Economics. Preq.: EB 502 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Consideration of the 
money market and portfolio management, the cost of capital, effects of monetary 
phenomena on investment and accumulation of wealth with emphasis throughout on 
problems arising from uncertainty; general equilibrium theory of money, interest, prices and 
output. Graduate Staff 

EB 606 Industrial Organization and Control. Preq.: EB 501. 3(3-0) F. Microeconomic 
theory is applied to the empirical analysis of public policies that affect the efficiency of 
resource allocation in the U. S. economy. Special attention is given to the interrelationships 
between industrial structure, conduct and performance. Erickson 

EB 610 Theory of Public Finance. Preq.: EB 501. 3(3-0) S. An application of 
microeconomic theory and welfare economics to the public sector. Topics include exter- 
nalities and public policy, the theory of public goods, collective choice, program budgeting 
and cost-benefit analysis, the theory of taxation and its application to tax policy, public debt, 
and fiscal federalism. Hyman 

EB 625 Long Range Planning in Business and Industry- Preq.: EB 501. 3(3-0) S. Theory 
and practice of long range planning in business and industry. Case discussions and intensive 
readings dealing with techniques for identifying opportunities and risks in the environment 
of the firm, determining corporate strengths and weaknesses, specifying long range strategy. 
Special attention is given to the roles of management and the internal processes of large 
organizations as the organizations respond to changes in external conditions. Dahle 



104 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

EB 630 Labor Economics and Manpower Problems. Preqs.: EB 501, 502. 3(3-0) S. The 
analysis of labor force problems and labor market behavior. Labor force measurement and 
behavior, the measurement and analysis of unemployment, the determinants of relative 
wages, wage structures, and hours of work and national manpower policy. Emphasis on em- 
pirical studies. Fearn 

EB 631 Human Capital. Preqs.: EB 501, 502. 3(3-0) F. An examination of human resource 
development from an economic view. Emphasis is placed on recent research and theoretical 
developments in the economics of education, on-the-job training, discrimination and migra- 
tion. Ihnen 

EB 640 Advanced Economic Development. Preqs.: EB 501, 502, 540. 3(3-0) S. An analysis 
of the factors determining the growth of poorer countries and regions of countries. Con- 
sideration is given to issues that have arisen in current theoretical and empirical bases for 
policy decisions. Included in the latter elements are the quantitative foundations for planned 
and programmed development. Applications of alternative planning methods are evaluated. 

Graduate Staff 

EB 641 Agricultural Production and Supply. Preqs.: EB 501 and ST 513. 3(3-0) S. An ad- 
vanced study in the logic of, and empirical inquiry into, producer behavior and choice among 
combinations of factors and kinds and qualities of output; aggregative consequences of in- 
dividuals' and firms' decisions in terms of product supply and factor demand; factor markets 
and income distribution; and general interdependence' among economic variables. 

Hoover 

EB 642 Consumption, Demand and Market Interdependency. Preqs.: EB 501 and ST 
513. 3(3-0) F. An analysis of the behavior of individual households and of consumers in the 
aggregate with respect to consumption of agricultural products; the impact of these decisions 
on demand for agricultural resources, the competition among agricultural regions and for 
markets; and the interdependence between agriculture and other sectors of the economy. 

King 

EB 648 Theory of International Trade. Preqs.: EB 501, 502. 3(3-0) S. A consideration of 
the specialized body of economic theory dealing with the international movement of goods, 
services, capital and payments. Also, a theoretically oriented consideration of policy. 

P. Johnson 

EB 649 Monetary Aspects of International Trade. Preq.: EB 502. 3(3-0) S. Study of the 
macroeconomic problems of an open economy including the balance of payments adjustment 
mechanism, alternative exchange rate systems, external effects of monetary and fiscal 
policy, optimum currency areas and international monetary reform. Grennes 

EB 650 Economic Decision Theory. Preq.: EB 501. 3(3-0) F,S. Study of general theories of 
choice. Structure of decision problems, the role of information; formulation of objectives. 
Current research problems. Carlson 

EB (ST) 651 Econometrics. Preqs.: EB 600, ST 421, ST 502. 3(3-0) F. The role and uses of 
statistical inference in economic research; the problem of spanning the gap from an economic 
model to its statistical counterpart; measurement problems and their solutions arising from 
the statistical model and the nature of the data; limitations and interpretation of results of 
economic measurement from statistical techniques. Schrimper 

EB (ST) 652 Topics in Econometrics. Preq.: EB (ST) 651. 3(3-0) S. Survey of current 
literature on estimation and inference in simultaneous stochastic equations systems. Techni- 
ques for combining cross section and time series data including covariance, error correlated 
and error component models. Lag models and inference in dynamic systems. Production 
functions, productivity measurement and hypotheses about economic growth. Complete and 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 105 

incomplete prior information in regression analysis. Nonlinear estimation in economic 
models. Gallant 

EB 699 Research in Economics. Preq.: Grad. standing. Credits Arranged. Individual 
research in economics under staff supervision and direction. Graduate Staff 



EDUCATION 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor C. J. Dolce, Dean 

Professor J. B. Kirkland, Dean Emeritus 

The following master's degree programs are offered by the School of Education: 
Adult and Community College Education 
Agricultural Education 
Curriculum and Instruction 
Educational Administration and Supervision 
Guidance and Personnel Services 
Industrial Arts Education 
Mathematics Education 
Occupational Education 
Psychology 
Science Education 
Special Education 
Vocational Industrial Education 

Students accepted into any of the above education programs may seek either the 
Master of Science degree or the Master of Education degree; students admitted to 
the Department of Psychology seek the Master of Science degree. The Master of 
Science degree is research-oriented and is preparation for further graduate study. 
The Master of Education is a professional degree which allows for wider latitude in 
the choice of course work than is allowed by the Master of Science program. 

The School of Education has also been approved by the State Department of 
Public Instruction to offer certification programs at the Intermediate (Sixth-Year) 
level in the following fields: 

Counselor 

School Administrator 

Curriculum-Instruction Generalist 

School Psychologist 

The following doctoral programs are offered by the School of Education: 
Adult and Community College Education Ed.D. 

Curriculum and Instruction Ed.D. 

Educational Administration and Supervision Ed.D. 



106 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Guidance and Personnel Services Ed.D. 

Industrial Arts Education Ed.D. 

Mathematics Education Ph.D. 

Occupational Education* Ed.D. 

Psychology Ph.D. 

Science Education Ph.D. 

Graduate programs are planned by the student and his or her committee in 
terms of the student's educational and career objectives, experience and previous 
preparation. 

Prior to consideration of an application for admission, the following must have 
been received by the Graduate School office, which forwards the completed file to 
the School of Education: completed application form, an official copy of current 
(not more than three years old) Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores, of- 
ficial transcripts for all undergraduate and graduate courses taken, and at least 
three completed recommendation forms. In most programs an interview is re- 
quired. Psychology also requires the GRE Advanced Test and the Miller Analogies 
Test. Individual programs may have additional requirements for admission. In or- 
der to maintain personalized, quality graduate programs, each program can enroll 
only a limited number of students irrespective of the qualifications of the appli- 
cants. 

The School of Education is housed in Poe Hall, a modern building with up-to-date 
research and instructional facilities including: 

Curriculum Materials Center— This center houses most State-adopted textbooks, 
various other references and textbooks, periodicals, curricular outlines and models, 
simulation games and a variety of audio-visual equipment and software, including 
video cameras, monitors and recorders. 

Computer Facility— This facility has several multi-purpose terminals, including 
a teletype and CRT terminal. Direct access to computer-stored ERIC files is 
available. A keypunch machine and a verifier are available for use by student and 
faculty researchers. 

Instructional Materials Production Center— This center is available to faculty 
and students within the School of Education as a workshop for the design and 
fabrication of original instructional materials. The center has capabilities for 
developing materials in the following media: motion pictures (super 8mm and 
16mm), still pictures (photographs, slides, filmstrips), audio recordings (cassettes 
and reel-to-reel), video tapes (studio and portable), displays (charts, posters, 
tackboards, magnetic boards, hook and loop boards), games and simulation models, 
and overhead transparencies (thermal and diazo). 

Office of Publications— This office prints and publishes instructional materials 
developed by faculty and students, as well as by public school teachers associated 
with various School programs. 

Laboratories— Poe Hall houses an extensive variety of laboratories such as 
metal, wood, ceramic and photography shops; a planetarium; counseling and 



Students in agricultural education or industrial and technical education would seek the Ed.D. in occupational education. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 107 

testing centers; a sleep laboratory; sensory deprivation chambers; and several 
animal rooms. 



Adult and Community College Education 

Adult and community college education is a component of both the School of 
Education and the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. For a listing of 
graduate faculty and departmental information, see adult and community college 
education, pages 53-54. 



Agricultural Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Associate Professor J. R. Clary, Acting Coordinator 

Professor Emeritus: C. C. Scarborough; Associate Professors: T. R. Miller, C. D. 
Bryant; Adjunct Assistant Professor: W. R. Robinson 

The agricultural education program offers study leading to the Master of 
Science and the Master of Education degrees. Both master's programs require a 
minimum of 36 semester hours which will reflect the student's background and 
career expectations and which must meet the approval of the student's advisory 
committee. Graduate programs are designed to meet the needs of individual stu- 
dents for further study and research as well as to prepare them for educational 
leadership roles in teaching, administration, supervision and research in 
agricultural education. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 554 Planning Programs in Agricultural Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 565 Agricultural Occupations. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 566 Occupational Experience in Agriculture. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 568 Adult Education in Agriculture. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 593 Special Problems in Agricultural Education. Credits Arranged. F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 664 Supervision in Agricultural Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 693 Advanced Problems in Agricultural Education. Credits Arranged. F,S. 

ED 694 Seminar in Agricultural Education. Maximum 2, 1(1-0) F,S. 



108 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Curriculum and Instruction 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Associate Professor B. M. Parramore, Head 

Adjunct Professor: T. L. Roundtree; Associate Professors: H. G. Ball, L. J. Betts 
Jr., C. W. Harper Jr., T. N. Walters; Associate Professor Emeritus: P. J. Rust; 
Assistant Professors: B. G. Beezer, B. J. Fox, C. C. Mahmoud, R. C. Serow; 
Assistant Professor Emeritus: K. A. McCutchen 

The department offers work leading to the Master of Education, Master of 
Science and Doctor of Education degrees. At least two years successful teaching ex- 
perience below the college level or other evidence of instructional skill are required 
of applicants. Each student's program is planned by a committee of three or more 
graduate faculty members and will reflect the applicant's undergraduate and 
graduate study, teaching experience and future professional plans. The purpose of 
the program is to prepare educators for leadership positions in the field of 
professional education. 

The master's program is for those persons who wish to develop instructional 
skills and innovative methodology in program areas ranging from pre-school 
through post-secondary education and who plan to qualify as instructional 
specialists and consultants in school systems. A minimum of 36 hours is required 
in the master's program which includes professional education, study in a teaching 
field and an internship. Candidates for the Master of Education degree prepare a 
formal report of an internship project and respond successfully to an oral examina- 
tion. Candidates for the Master of Science degree conduct an investigation 
culminating in a thesis. Those completing the master's program may qualify for a 
graduate teaching certificate. 

Doctoral programs are individually planned by the student's graduate commit- 
tee. The programs include study in both professional education and in academic 
disciplines related to teaching specialties, an internship and emphasis on develop- 
ing research competencies. The programs are for curriculum specialists and 
generalists, university instructors in professional education, and instructional- 
evaluation specialists. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

ED 483 An Introduction to Instructional Media. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 514 Formative Ideas in American Education. 3(3-0) S.Sum. 

ED 515 Teaching Disadvantaged Youth. 3(3-0) Alt. S.Sum. 

ED 519 Early Childhood Education. 3(1-4) S,Sum. 

ED 542 Contemporary Approaches in The Teaching of Social Studies. 3(3-0) S.Sum. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 109 

ED 545 Developmental Reading Instruction. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 546 Principles and Practices of Secondary School Reading Instruction. 3(3-0) 
F.Sum. 

ED 547 Analysis of Reading Abilities. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 548 Theory and Process in Reading and Language Arts. 3(3-0) Alt. S. 

ED 563 Effective Teaching. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. 

ED 598 Special Problems in Curriculum and Instruction. 1-6 F.S.Sum. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 602 Curriculum. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 614 Contemporary Educational Thought. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 64 IB Practicum in Reading. 1-6 S. 

Educational Administration and Supervision 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor C. J. Dolce, Coordi?iator; Assistant Professor: R. T. Williams 

The graduate programs in educational administration and supervision have a 
multidisciplinary emphasis which includes courses in economics, politics, psy- 
chology and sociology as well as in professional education. Programs are planned 
individually on the basis of an analysis of the career objectives and competencies of 
the students. In addition to formal courses, planned non-credit experiences are 
designed to enhance the professional development of the student. 

The master's degree program (M.S., M.Ed.), which requires a minimum of 36 
hours, is designed to prepare individuals for entry level administrative and super- 
visory positions in public school systems and related educational agencies. One 
semester of full-time residency is required. 

The doctoral program (Ed.D.), which includes a large component of clinical prac- 
tice, requires an internship experience and a minimum of one academic year of full- 
time residency. 

In addition to other listed requirements for admission (see pages 24-25) a 
narrative statement written by the applicant is required. This statement should 
describe in detail the career objectives of the applicant and the specific objectives 
for enrolling in a graduate program. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED (SOC) 501 Leadership. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 517 Implications for Data Processing in Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 



110 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ED 518 Introduction to Education Law. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 550 Principles of Educational Administration. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 580 Evaluation Theory and Practice in Education. 3(3-0) F. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 620 Cases in Educational Administration. 3(3-0) S. 

Guidance and Personnel Services 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor W. E. Hopke, Head 

Professor Emeritus: C. G. Morehead; Associate Professors: L. K. Jones, B. C. 
Talley; Assistayit Pwfessors: E. R. Gerler, D. C. Locke, J. G. McVay 

The department offers work leading to the Master of Science, Master of Educa- 
tion and Doctor of Education degrees as well as to the sixth-year certificate, with a 
major in the field of guidance and personnel services (or counselor education). Each 
of these degrees is designed to prepare individuals for guidance and personnel posi- 
tions at various levels in elementary and secondary schools, junior and community 
colleges, trade and technical schools and institutes and institutions of higher 
education. The student may specialize in one of several areas depending upon in- 
dividual career goals. 

It is desirable for an applicant to have had undergraduate or graduate course 
work in economics, education, psychology, sociology or social work. Students accep- 
ted into the department are those who anticipate devoting full- or part-time to 
guidance and personnel work. 

Admission requirements for the department are: a minimum of a B average in 
undergraduate work; satisfactory scores on the aptitude section of the Graduate 
Record Examination; three satisfactory letters of recommendation in regard to 
previous education and employment experiences, personal characteristics and 
emotional maturity. 

For descriptions of the guidance and personnel courses listed below, see page 117. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

ED 420 Principles of Guidance. Preq.: ED 344. 3(3-0) F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 520 Introduction to Guidance and Counseling. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. 

ED 521 Internship in Guidance and Personnel Services. Credits Arranged. F,S. 

ED 524 Information Processes and Group Guidance. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 111 

ED 530 Theories and Techniques of Counseling. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. 

ED 533 Group Counseling. 3(3-0) S.Sum. 

ED 534 Guidance in the Elementary School. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

ED 535 Student Personnel Work in Higher Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 590 Special Problems in Guidance. Maximum 6 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 631 Vocational Development Theory. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 633 Development and Coordination of School Guidance Programs. 3(3-0) S.Sum. 

ED 636 Observation and Supervised Field Work. Maximum 3 F,S. 

ED 640 Laboratory Experiences in Counseling. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 641 A Practicum in Counseling. 2-6 F,S. 

ED 666 Supervision of Counseling. 3(1-8) F,S. 

Industrial and Technical Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. M. Hanson, Coordinator 

Professor Emeritus: J. T. Nerden; Associate Professor: F. S. Smith; Assistant 
Professors: W. M. Parker, T. C. Shore Jr. 

The program in industrial and technical education provides graduate work 
leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Master of Education in vocational 
industrial education. The rapid development of industrial and technical education 
in North Carolina and throughout the nation provides opportunities for teachers, 
supervisors and administrators who have earned advanced degrees. 

The facilities at the University allow supporting courses at the graduate level in 
the related fields of computer science, economics and business, engineering, 
guidance and personnel services, mathematics, psychology, sociology and 
statistics. The prerequisite for graduate work in the programs in industrial and 
technical education is a proficiency in the undergraduate courses required for the 
bachelor's degree in industrial or technical education, or a substantial equivalent. 

A limited number of teaching and research assistantships and fellowships are 
available for qualified graduate students. 



112 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES* 

ED 525 Trade Analysis and Course Construction. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 591 Special Problems in Industrial Education. Maximum 6. F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 608 Supervision of Vocational and Industrial Arts Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 609 Planning and Organizing Technical Education Programs. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 691 Seminar in Industrial Education. 1(1-0) F,S. 

Industrial Arts Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Associate Professor T. B. Young, Coordinator 

Professor Emeritus: D. W. Olson 

The industrial arts education program offers graduate work leading to the 
degrees of Master of Science, Master of Education and Doctor of Education. 
Graduate programs are designed for teachers who wish to develop their instruc- 
tional competencies and for those who wish to be supervisors and administrators of 
industrial arts programs. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

IA 510 Design for Industrial Arts Teachers. Preqs.: Six hours of drawing, IA 205 or 
equivalent. 3(2-2) Sum. A study of new developments in the field of design with emphasis on 
the relationship of material and form in the selection and designing of industrial arts pro- 
jects. Graduate Staff 

IA (ED) 560 New Developments in Industrial Arts Education. Preqs.: Twelve hours of 
education and teaching experience. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. This course is a study of the new develop- 
ments in industrial arts education. It is designed to assist teachers and administrators in 
developing new concepts and new content based on the changes in technology. 

Graduate Staff 

IA 590 Laboratory Problems in Industrial Arts. Preqs.: Sr. standing, CI. Maximum 6. 
F.S.Sum. Courses based on individual problems and designed to give advanced majors in in- 
dustrial arts education the opportunity to broaden or intensify their knowledge and abilities 
through investigation and research in the various fields of industrial arts, such as metals, 
plastics, ceramics or electricity-electronics. Graduate Staff 

IA 592 Special Problems in Industrial Arts. Preq.: One term of student teaching or 
equivalent. Maximum 6. F.S.Sum. The purpose of this course is to broaden the subject mat- 



* For other courses, see occupational education, page 114. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 113 

ter experience in the areas of industrial arts. Problems involving curriculum, investigation 
or research in one or more industrial arts areas will be required. Graduate Staff 

IA (ED) 595 Industrial Arts Workshop. Preq.: One or more years of teaching experience. 
3(3-0) Sum. A course for experienced teachers, administrators and supervisors of industrial 
arts. The primary purpose will be to develop sound principles and practices for initiating, 
conducting and evaluating programs in this field. Enrollees will pool their knowledge and 
practical experiences and will do intensive research work on individual and group problems. 
(See also ED 552, ED 555.) Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 630 Philosophy of Industrial Arts. Preq.: Twelve hours in ED. 2(2-0) F,S. 

ED 635 Administration and Supervision of Industrial Arts. Preq.: Six hours in ED or 
PSY. 2(2-0) F.S. 

IA 645 Technology and Industrial Arts. Preqs.: IA 560, ED 630. 3(3-0) F,S. Technology: 
its nature, origins, advance. Impact of technological advance on man and culture. Technology 
as the material culture. Changing concepts of work, skill, occupations, discretionary time. 
Technology and its relation to industrial arts education. Graduate Staff 

IA (ED) 660 Industrial Arts Curriculum. Preq.: IA 645. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Industrial arts 
curriculum origins, analysis, organization, evaluation, revision. Subject matter derivation 
and classification applicable to all levels of instruction. Relationships among curriculum, 
philosophy and methodology. (See also ED 608, ED 610, ED 630, ED 635, and ED 692.) 

Graduate Staff 

ED 692 Seminar in Industrial Arts Education. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) F,S. 



Mathematics and Science Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor H. E. Speece, Head 

Professors: N. D. Anderson, L. M. Clark, J. R. Kolb; Associate Professors: R. D. 
Simpson, W. M. Waters Jr., L. W. Watson; Associate Professor Emeritus: H. A. 
Shannon. 

The Department of Mathematics and Science Education offers graduate work 
leading to the degrees of Master of Science, Master of Education and Doctor of 
Philosophy with majors in mathematics education or in science education and In- 
termediate level certification in both fields. Each student's program is individually 
planned by a graduate committee and will reflect one's undergraduate and 
graduate preparation, teaching experience and future professional plans. Students 
take courses in both professional education and in their teaching specialties. Areas 
of specialization include mathematics, biological science, earth science, chemistry 
and physics. 



114 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Doctoral students are required to have a reading knowledge of one modern 
foreign language. Additional communication skills may be required by the ad- 
visory committee. Independent reading and participation in seminars are an in- 
dispensable part of the doctoral program. The heart of the program is the disserta- 
tion. It must be original research resulting in a significant contribution to science 
education or mathematics education and should be worthy of publication in the 
current literature. 

Applicants must meet the admissions requirements of the Graduate School. In 
addition, they must have departmental approval. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 511 Implications of Mathematical Content, Structure, and Processes for the 
Teaching of Mathematics in the Elementary School. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 512 Teaching Mathematics in Elementary and Junior High School. 3(3-0) S.Sum. 

ED 570 Foundations of Mathematics Education. 3(3-0) Sum. 

ED 575 Foundations of Science Education. 3(3-0) S.Sum. 

ED 592 Special Problems in Mathematics Teaching. 1-3 Sum. 

ED 594 Special Problems in Science Teaching. 1-3 Sum. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 603 Teaching Mathematics and Science in Higher Education. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 604 Curriculum Development and Evaluation in Science and Mathematics. 3(3-0) 
S. 

ED 605 Education and Supervision of Teachers of Mathematics and Science. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 690 Seminar in Mathematics Education. 2(2-0) F,S. 

ED 641D Practicum in Science and Mathematics Education. 1-6 F,S. 

ED 695 Seminar in Science Education. 2(2-0) F,S. 



Occupational Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Associate Professor J. R. Clary, Head 

Professors: D. M. Hanson, Coordinator, J. K. Coster; Professors Emeriti: J. T. Ner- 
den, C. C. Scarborough; Associate Professors: C. D. Bryant, T. R. Miller, F. S. 
Smith, T. B. Young; Assistant Professors: W. L. Cox Jr., W. M. Parker, T. C. 
Shore; Adjunct Assistant Professor: W. R. Robinson 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 115 

The Department of Occupational Education includes programs leading to advan- 
ced degrees in the program areas of agricultural education, industrial and technical 
education, and industrial arts education. For descriptions of tha advanced degree 
programs in these areas, see earlier sections in education. In addition, the depart- 
ment offers advanced degree programs in occupational education and courses 
leading to certification in the teaching of Introduction to Vocations. 

This section of the catalog describes the advanced programs in occupational 
education per se; that is, programs in which the major is occupational education. 
The department offers leadership development programs in occupational education 
for the Master of Education and Master cf Science degrees, the Intermediate 
(Sixth-Year) Program, and Doctor of Education degree. 

The master's programs are designed to prepare persons for entry-level ad- 
ministrative and supervisory positions in occupational education. However, stu- 
dents may prepare for other careers, such as master teachers of Introduction to 
Vocations or career exploration programs. All occupational education majors will 
be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the broad spectrum of occupational 
education programs and the place of occupational education in the total education 
system. Preparation for specific career lines is achieved through elective courses in 
the major and through a minor of not less than nine hours of graduate work. 

The master's programs require a minimum of 36 semester hours of graduate 
work, including 27 hours in the major. Additional hours will be specified by the stu- 
dent's advisory committee for those who do not have a baccalaureate degree in an 
occupational education field. Students who elect the Master of Science substitute 
the thesis for part of the course load. 

The Intermediate (Sixth-Year) Program requires a minimum of 60 semester 
hours of graduate work, including 48 hours in the major. 

The primary purpose of the doctoral program is to prepare persons for advanced 
positions in occupational education. Students may elect to prepare for such posi- 
tions as administrator, research specialist, curriculum development specialist or 
teacher educator in occupational education. There is no minimum number of hours 
of graduate work specified for the doctoral program. Emphasis is placed on 
developing competencies, and students may be advised to supplement their course 
work. 

Applicants to the graduate level programs must take the Graduate Record Ex- 
amination and submit a resume of work experience with a statement of career 
goals. Application processes must be completed within six months of the date the 
Graduate School receives the application. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 504 Principles and Practices of Introduction to Vocations. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. 

ED 505 Public Area Schools. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 516 Community Occupational Surveys. 2(2-0) S. 

ED 522 Career Exploration. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. 



116 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ED 527 Philosophy of Occupational Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 528 Cooperative Occupational Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 529 Curriculum Materials Development. 3(3-0) F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 608 Supervision of Vocational and Industrial Arts Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 609 Planning and Organizing Technical Education Programs. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 610 Administration of Vocational and Industrial Arts Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 611 Laws, Regulations and Policies Affecting Vocational Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 612 Finance, Accounting, and Management of Vocational Education Programs. 

3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 688 Research Application in Occupational Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 
ED 689 Evaluation in Occupational Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

Psychology 

For a listing of departmental faculty and courses, see page 230. 



Special Education 

The master's degree programs, M.Ed, and M.S., are administered by the Depart- 
ment of Curriculum and Instruction. The primary objective is to educate teachers 
of students who require specialized instructional skills and techniques; e.g., 
mentally retarded, learning disabled and sensory impaired students such as the 
visually handicapped. The student's program is individually planned and places 
emphasis upon the fields of psychology and education. Applications are considered 
in March only for enrollment the following summer or fall. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 506 Education of Exceptional Children. 3(3-0) S.Sum. 

ED 508 Severe and Profound Mental Retardation. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 509 Methods and Materials— Teaching Retarded Children. 3(3-0) S.Sum. 

ED 523 Orientation and Mobility of the Visually Impaired. 3(3-0) Sum. 

ED (PSY) 531 Mental Retardation. 3(3-0) F.Sum. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 117 

ED 536 Structure and Function of the Eye and Use of Low Vision. 3(3-0) Sum. 

ED 556 Learning Disabilities. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 557 Methods and Materials in Learning Disabilities. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 558 Resource Teaching in Special Education. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 561 Educational Diagnosis and Prescription for Exceptional Children. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 562 Communication Disorders in the Classroom. 3(3-0) Alt. S. 

ED 564 Classroom Management in Special Education. 3(3-0) F. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 641C Practicum in Special Education. 1-6 F,S. 

Education Courses 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 500 The Community College System. Preq.: Grad. or advanced undergrad. standing. 
3(3-0) F,S, Comprehensive community colleges and technical institutes and the state systems 
of which they are a part: underlying concepts, educational needs they are designed to serve, 
role in meeting these needs, historical development, issues in the establishment and opera- 
tion of state systems and individual institutions, unresolved issues and emerging trends. 

Graduate Staff 

ED (SOC) 501 Leadership. Preq.: SOC 202 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. A study of leadership 
in various fields of American life; analysis of the various factors associated with leadership; 
techniques of leadership. Particular attention is given to recreational, scientific and ex- 
ecutive leadership procedures. Graduate Staff 

ED 503 The Programming Process in Adult and Community College Education. 

Preqs.: ED 501, CI. 3(3-0) F,S. The principles and processes involved in programming, in- 
cluding basic theories and concepts supporting the programming process. Attention will be 
given to the general framework in which programming is done, the organization needed and 
the program roles of both professional and lay leaders. Graduate Staff 

ED 504 Principles and Practices of Introduction to Vocations. Preqs.: Twelve hours in 
ED. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. This course is designed for teachers in the public schools of North 
Carolina who teach "Introduction to Vocations." The course emphasizes the place of the in- 
troduction to vocations program in the overall school curriculum, special methods of instruc- 
tion, use of teaching aids and use of student evaluation instruments. An overview is also 
presented in the areas of community organization, job markets, group procedures, oc- 
cupational and educational information, and the changing occupational structure in our 
society. Cox 

ED 505 Public Area Schools. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. Junior and community 
colleges, technical institutes, vocational schools and branches of universities: their develop- 
ment, status and prospects, policy and policy-making, clientele, purposes, evaluation 
programs, personnel, organization administration, financing, facilities, research and 
development functions. Graduate Staff 



118 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ED 506 Education of Exceptional Children. Preq.: Six hours ED or PSY. 3(3-0) S.Sum. 
Principles and techniques of teaching the exceptional child with major interest on the men- 
tally handicapped and slow learner. Practice in instruction for groups of children, and in- 
dividual techniques for teaching retarded children in average classroom. Opportunity for in- 
dividual work with an exceptional child. Graduate Staff 

ED 508 Severe and Profound Mental Retardation. Preq.: ED 531 or CI; Coreq.: ED 508 
may be taken concurrently with ED 531. 3(3-0) F. A study of the area of severe and/or 
profound mental retardation, including definitions, incidence, etiology, characteristics, 
assessment procedures, educational programs and social/vocational programs. Course will 
also focus on the legal and ethical issues involved in working with the severely retarded. 

Hasselbring 

ED 509 Methods and Materials— Teaching Retarded Children. Preq.: ED 506. 3(3-0) 
S.Sum. Understanding and correlating developmental levels of mentally retarded children 
and appropriate educational methods and materials. Use of child's diagnostic data; con- 
sideration of long and short range educational goals; curriculum planning and scheduling; 
teacher guidance of children toward social and emotional maturity. Hasselbring 

ED 510 Adult Education: History, Philosophy, Contemporary Nature. Preq.: Grad. 
standing. 3(3-0) F,S. A study of the historical and philosophical foundations of adult educa- 
tion from ancient times to the present, giving attention to key figures, issues, institutions, 
movements and programs, including consideration of the relationship between adult educa- 
tion's historical development and prevailing intellectual, social, economic and political condi- 
tions. Consideration of adult education's contemporary nature, present-day schools of 
thought on its objectives and trends. Graduate Staff 

ED 511 Implications of Mathematical Content, Structure, and Processes for the 
Teaching of Mathematics in the Elementary School. Preq.: Bachelor's degree in elemen- 
tary education or CI. 3(3-0) F. Designed for teachers and supervisors of mathematics in the 
elementary school. Special emphasis on implications of mathematical content, structure, and 
processes in teaching arithmetic and geometry in elementary School. Watson 

ED 512 Teaching Mathematics in Elementary and Junior High School. Preq.: ED 471 
or equivalent. 3(3-0) S.Sum. Comprehensive study of teaching mathematics in elementary 
and junior high schools. Major emphasis on building skills in teaching arithmetic, elemen- 
tary algebra and intuitive geometry. Thorough search of the literature relative to the 
mathematics curricula will be conducted, designing and sequencing of learning activities, 
teaching mathematical concepts and relationships, building skill in computation, reading 
mathematics, problem solving, and measurement will be covered. Watson 

ED (SOC) 513 Community Organization. Preq.: SOC 202 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Com- 
munity organization is viewed as a process of bringing about desirable changes in com- 
munity life. Community needs and resources available to meet these needs are studied. 
Democratic processes in community action and principles of community organization are 
stressed, along with techniques and procedures. The roles of leaders, both lay and 
professional, in community development are analyzed. Graduate Staff 

ED 514 Formative Ideas in American Education. Preq.: Six hours ED or PSY, or CI. 3(3- 
0) F.Sum. A consideration of the theory and practice of American education as an extension 
of the philosophical climate of opinion of different intellectual ages, and how the present 
status of our educational system is grounded in the thought of the past. Beezer 

ED 515 Teaching Disadvantaged Youth. Preq.: Six hours ED or PSY, teaching ex- 
perience. 3(3-0) Alt. S.Sum. This course presents a theoretical structure for looking at and 
understanding the problems disadvantaged youth face in our educational system. It offers a 
set of alternative teaching strategies for helping children learn. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 119 

ED 516 Community Occupational Surveys. Preqs.: Six hours in ED, CI. 2(2-0) S. 
Methods in organizing and conducting local surveys and evaluation of findings in planning a 
program of occupational education. Shore, Hanson 

ED 517 Implications for Data Processing in Education. Preqs.: CSC 111; ED 529 or CI. 
3(3-0) F,S. An intensive study of current attempts to apply new technologies to education. 
Attention will be given to research findings related to computer assisted instruction, gamed 
instructional simulation, approaches to guidance and prescription learning, as well as ad- 
ministrative problems pertaining to student scheduling, pupil transportation and data 
reporting systems. Graduate Staff 

ED 518 Introduction to Education Law. Preq.: Six hours graduate credit. 3(3-0) S. A 
study of constitutional, statutory, administrative, common, and case law as it relates to 
educational settings, particularly in the areas of personnel, finance, program, contracts, 
property, liability, and students. Includes all educational levels with particular reference to 
North Carolina and federal law. Beezer 

ED 519 Early Childhood Education. Preq.: PSY 475 or PSY 576. 3(1-4) S.Sum. Planning, 
selecting, and using human resources, activities, materials, and facilities in the education of 
young children. Student observation, participation and evaluation of educational experiences 
for the developmental level of individual children for an optimum learning environment. A 
synthesis of the student's knowledge of human development, learning theory and research 
findings as related to classroom application. Graduate Staff 

ED 520 Introduction to Guidance and Counseling. Preq.: Six hours in ED or PSY. 3(3-0) 
F.S.Sum. An introduction to the philosophies, theories, principles and issues of guidance and 
counseling services, with major emphasis on guidance at the secondary school level. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 521 Internship in Guidance and Personnel Services. Preqs.: Eighteen hours in 
department and CI. Credits Arranged. F,S. A continuous full-time internship of at least one- 
half semester. Framework of school and community. Work with students, teachers, ad- 
ministrators, guidance and pupil personnel workers, parents, and resource personnel in the 
community. Supervision of intern by guidance personnel in school as well as by course 
instructors. Graduate Staff 

ED 522 Career Exploration. Preqs.: ED 344 and grad. status or CI. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. This 
course is designed for teachers in the public schools of North Carolina who teach in "career 
exploration" programs. The course emphasizes the philosophy of career exploration, theories 
supporting career exploration, the place of exploration programs in the overall school 
curriculum, correlation of occupational information in academic subjects, sources of oc- 
cupational information and its use, and approaches to teaching in a career exploration 
program. Cox 

ED 523 Orientation and Mobility of the Visually Impaired. 3(3-0) Sum. The sensory 
processes and sensory cues on which independent mobility depends for the visually impaired 
person. Various techniques and modes of travel considered. Emphasis given to instruction 
and background which will enable person not teaching orientation mobility as a skill to rein- 
force the learning that takes place in other situations. R. Rawls 

ED 524 Information Processes and Group Guidance. Preq.: Six hours of ED or PSY. 3(3- 
0) F,S,Sum. The collection, classification, and use of occupational, educational, and personal- 
social information in schools, post-secondary institutions and agencies. The course is also 
designed to help teachers and counselors learn about group guidance activities and to learn 
how to plan and organize the information service as well as specific guidance activities in 
groups. Hopke 



120 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ED 525 Trade Analysis and Course Construction. Preqs.: ED 344, PSY 304. 3(3-0) F. 
Principles and practices in analyzing occupations for the purpose of determining teaching 
content. Practice in the principles underlying industrial course organization based on oc- 
cupational analysis covering instruction skills and technology and including course outlines, 
job sequences, the development of industrial materials and instructional schedules. 

Shore, Hanson 

ED 526 Teaching in College. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. Designed primarily for graduate stu- 
dents in the departments outside the School of Education, this course focuses on the develop- 
ment of competencies to perform the day-to-day tasks of a college teacher as well as con- 
sideration of more long-range tasks such as course development and the university respon- 
sibilities of a professor. In addition to attending lectures and other types of presentations, 
students will make video tapes of their teaching, develop tests, design an introductory course 
in their teaching field, and engage in similar types of activities. Anderson 

ED 527 Philosophy of Occupational Education. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) F,S. An 
historical and philosophical investigation into the social and economic aspects of oc- 
cupational education; an overview of the broad field of occupational education for youth and 
adults, with emphasis upon the trends and problems connected with the conduct of oc- 
cupational education under federal and state guidance. An overview study of federal and 
state legislation pertaining to occupational education. Bryant, Shore, Graduate Staff 

ED 528 Cooperative Occupational Education. Preq.: CI. 3(3-0) F,S. This course is 
designed to guide and assist in the growth patterns of individuals who are preparing to be 
directors, administrators or supervisors of occupational education programs at the local, 
state and/or national levels, with special emphasis upon the organization and operation of 
cooperative occupational education on secondary, postsecondary and adult levels. It will 
refer to the accepted programs. The course will cover the entire field of cooperative oc- 
cupational education on secondary, postsecondary and adult levels. It will refer to the accep- 
ted essentials of cooperative education in order that the application of the philosophy to the 
details of planning, organization, establishment, and operation of cooperative occupational 
programs will be practical and meaningful. Included will be student visitations to existing 
quality programs in cooperative occupational education for the purpose of studying on-site 
conditions related to this specialized area of study. Smith 

ED 529 Curriculum Materials Development. Preq.: ED 525. 3(3-0) F,S. Selection and 
organization of curricula and instructional materials. Hanson 

ED 530 Theories and Techniques of Counseling. Preq.: Six hours of ED or PSY; Coreq.: 
ED 520 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. A combination of the study of theory and philosophy 
in counseling with techniques of counseling. Topics to be examined include behavioral ap- 
proaches, psychoanalytic approaches, client-centered counseling, existential counseling and 
relationship models, and their relation to counseling. For each theory, the techniques are 
related to the theoretical concepts and principles. Graduate Staff 

ED (PSY) 531 Mental Retardation. Preqs.: Nine hours PSY and special education. 3(3-0) 
F.Sum. Description, causation, psychological factors and sociological aspects of mental 
retardation. Examination of educational methods for the mentally retarded. 

Hasselbring 

ED 532 Introduction to Educational Inquiry. Preqs.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. A 
survey of basic concepts and methods of educational inquiry. Emphasis is on the logic un- 
derlying various approaches to problem definition and solution and on the tools of the in- 
vestigator, as well as on sources and interpretation of research information related to the 
student's particular area of study. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 121 

ED 533 Group Counseling. Preq.: ED 530. 3(3-0) S.Sum. A study of the theory and princi- 
ples of effective group work and the skills necessary for using specific counseling techniques, 
for the planning and organization of group counseling activities in the elementary school, 
secondary school, or other institutions. Supervised experience provides, to a limited extent, 
practice in the use of various techniques of group leadership in the area of interest for each 
student. Locke 

ED 534 Guidance in the Elementary School. Preq.: Nine hours PSY or CI. 3(3-0) 
F,S,Sum. Designed for acquainting elementary school teachers, counselors and ad- 
ministrators with theory, practice and organization of elementary school guidance. 

Gerler 

ED 535 Student Personnel Work in Higher Education. Preqs.: Nine hours PSY or CI. 
3(3-0) F,S. Examines practices in various areas of student personnel work. Studies both 
structure and function of student personnel programs in higher education. McVay 

ED 536 Structure and Function of the Eye and Use of Low Vision. Preq.: CI. 3(3-0) Sum. 
Special institute for participants to spend minimum of 45 hours in class and class related ac- 
tivities. Medical and educational consultants discuss structure and function of the eye, eye 
anomalies affecting children with low vision, methods of teaching children to use minimal vi- 
sion effectively. R. Rawls 

ED 537 The Extension and Public Service Function in Higher Education. Preq.: ED 
510. 3(3-0) S. An examination of the background, history, philosophy and contemporary 
nature of the extension and public service function of institutions of higher education in the 
United States. Emphasis is placed on the adult education role of public and private univer- 
sities and colleges. Specific focus is on: general extension, industrial extension, engineering 
extension, cooperative extension and continuing education. Graduate Staff 

ED 538 Instructional Strategies in Adult and Community College Education. Preqs.: 
ED 559, grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. This course examines forms of instruction appropriate for 
the teaching of adults. Special emphasis will be placed upon methods which maximally in- 
volve the adult learner. The study of concepts, theories, and principles relevant to the selec- 
tion, utilization, and evaluation of instructional strategies will focus on the integration of 
theory into practice. Through participation in classroom exercises, the student will develop 
proficiency in using teaching techniques which are applicable in adult and community 
college education. Graduate Staff 

ED 539 Educational Gerontology. Preq.: Six hours in ED, SOC, or PSY. 3(3-0) F. A broad 
overview of factors associated with the education of older adults. Various sociological, 
physiological, psychological, and economic aspects of aging are explored in terms of their 
educational implications. Attention is given to knowledge and skills required for the develop- 
ment of educational programs for the aging population. Graduate Staff 

ED 541 Community Education. Preqs.: ED 503 and SOC 513. 3(3-0) S. This course ex- 
plores nonformal approaches to education in community settings. History and philosophy of 
community education, models of institutional response to community, functional dimensions 
of community education, and community education planning are analysed within the context 
of matching resources to needs. Students will develop knowledge and skill in the designing of 
community education as a process and a product. Graduate Staff 

ED 542 Contemporary Approaches in the Teaching of Social Studies. Preq.: Advanced 
undergrad. or grad. standing; must have completed student teaching. 3(3-0) S.Sum. An 
analysis of the principles, strategies and application of new teaching approaches. Study of 
team-teaching, programmed instruction, inductive and reflective-oriented teaching; role- 
playing, simulation and gaming, independent study and block-time organization. 

Harper, Parramore 



122 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ED 545 Developmental Reading Instruction. Preq.: Twelve hours of ED or PSY. 3(3-0) F. 
A study of current methods and materials for the teaching of developmental and remedial 
reading, with emphasis on planning and implementing instructional programs for children 
with reading competencies from prereading through grade six. Graduate Staff 

ED 546 Principles and Practices of Secondary School Reading Instruction. Preq.: 
Twelve hours in ED or PSY. 3(3-0) F,Sum. A study of principles and practices of teaching 
reading at the secondary school level, including reading instruction in the content areas. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 547 Analysis of Reading Abilities. Preq.: ED 545 or ED 546. 3(3-0) S. A study of tests 
and techniques in determining specific abilities; a study of reading retardation and factors 
underlying reading difficulties. Fox 

ED 548 Theory and Process in Reading and Language Arts. Preq.: Twelve hours in ED 
or PSY. 3(3-0) Alt. S. An investigation of theoretical models and processes in reading and 
language arts with emphasis on the translation of research findings to instructional practice. 

Fox 

ED 550 Principles of Educational Administration. Preqs.: Grad. standing, CI. 3(3-0) F. 
This course is designed as an introductory course in educational administration. Emphasiz- 
ing basic principles of administration, the course will draw upon administrative theory, 
business, and public administration models as well as theoretical constructs from various 
disciplines. Dolce 

ED 552 Industrial Arts in the Elementary School. Preqs.: Twelve hours ED, CI. 3(3-0) 
Sum. This course is organized to help elementary teachers and principals understand how 
tools, materials and industrial processes may be used to vitalize and supplement the elemen- 
tary school child's experiences. Practical children's projects along with the building of 
classroom equipment. Graduate Staff 

ED 554 Planning Programs in Agricultural Education. Preq.: ED 411 or equivalent. 3(3- 
0) F,S. Consideration of the need for planning programs in education; objectives and evalua- 
tion of community programs; use of advisory group; organization and use of facilities. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 555 Comparative Crafts and Industries. Preqs.: Advanced undergrad. or grad. 
standing, CI. 6 Sum. A travel seminar as a cultural appreciation course involving study of in- 
digenous crafts and industries, their materials, processes, products and design in foreign 
countries. Graduate Staff 

ED 556 Learning Disabilities. Preq.: ED 506 or CI. 3(3-0) F. A study of the field of learn- 
ing disabilities, including definitions, prevalence, etiology, characteristics and current 
educational trends for educating learning disabled students. Mahmoud 

ED 557 Methods and Materials in Learning Disabilities. Preq.: ED 556 or CI. 3(3-0) S. A 
study of the current methods and materials for the teaching of learning disabled students in 
the elementary and/or secondary schools, including curriculum and instructional techni- 
ques. Course will focus on examination of commercial materials and the development of 
teacher-made materials for use with the learning disabled student. Mahmoud 

ED 558 Resource Teaching in Special Education. Preq.: ED 506 or CI. 3(3-0) S. A study 
of resource teaching in the area of special education, with emphasis on resource teaching 
with the learning disabled and mentally retarded. Course will focus on types of resource 
programs, how to establish and maintain a program, selection of students, curriculum and 
materials. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 123 

ED 559 Learning Concepts and Theories Applied to Adult and Community College 
Education. Preq.: Six hours in ED. 3(3-0) S. Principles involved in adult education programs 
including theories and concepts undergirding and requisite to these programs. Emphasis will 
be given to the interrelationship of the nature of adult learning, the nature of the subject 
matter and the setting in which learning occurs. The applicability of relevant principles and 
pertinent research findings to adult learning will be thoroughly treated. 

Graduate Staff 

ED (IA) 560 New Developments in Industrial Arts Education. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. (See in- 
dustrial arts education, page 112.) 

ED 561 Educational Diagnosis and Prescription for Exceptional Children. Preq.: ED 
506 or CI. 3(3-0) F. A study of the concept of educational diagnosis of exceptional students, in- 
cluding an examination of educational diagnostic procedures in current use in special educa- 
tion. Course will focus on the development of informal diagnostic techniques and procedures 
for adapting curriculum and instruction for the exceptional learner. Graduate Staff 

ED 562 Communication Disorders in the Classroom. Preq.: ED 506 or CI. 3(3-0) Alt. S. A 
study of communication disorders which occur in the school age population, including types 
of disorders, prevalence, etiology, characteristics, and corrective therapy. Course will focus 
on communication disorders among exceptional students and the classroom teacher's role in 
working with communication disorders. Mahmoud 

ED 563 Effective Teaching. Preq.: Twelve hours ED including student teaching. 3(3-0) 
F,S,Sum. Analysis of the teaching-learning process; assumptions that underlie course ap- 
proaches; identifying problems of importance; problem solution for effective learning; 
evaluation of teaching and learning; making specific plans for effective teaching. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 564 Classroom Management in Special Education. Preq.: ED 506 or CI. 3(3-0) F. A 
study of the concepts and procedures involved in the design and implementation of techni- 
ques for managing exceptional students in a classroom setting. Course will focus on methods 
for increasing and maintaining appropriate classroom behaviors in exceptional learners. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 565 Agricultural Occupations. Preq.: ED 411. 3(3-0) F,S. The theory of education and 
work is related to the expanding field of agricultural occupations. Career development in 
agricultural occupations is associated with curriculum development needs. Occupational ex- 
perience in agriculture is seen in relation to the curriculum and the placement in agricultural 
occupations. Graduate Staff 

ED 566 Occupational Experience in Agriculture. Preq.: ED 411. 3(3-0) F,S. A major and 
critical element in all programs of vocational education is the provision for appropriate stu- 
dent learning experiences in a real and simulated employment environment. Due to recent 
developments in education and agriculture, new and expanded concepts of occupational ex- 
perience have been devised. Current research substantiates the need and desire of teachers of 
agriculture for assistance in implementing the new concepts. The course is designed not only 
to provide this aid but to develop a depth of understanding of the theoretical foundations un- 
derlying the new developments in occupational experiences to stimulate individual growth 
and creativity in implementing further developments. Graduate Staff 

ED 567 Concepts and Strategies of Understanding, Motivating and Teaching Disad- 
vantaged Adults. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) S.Sum. Designed to help adult educators ac- 
quire a comprehensive understanding of the educational, psychological, social, cultural, and 
economic problems of the culturally deprived segments of society. In-depth explorations of 



124 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

the theoretical basis for understanding, motivating and teaching disadvantaged adults will 
be interwoven with practical application of these bases to specific educational opportunities 
with the disadvantaged adult learner. Graduate Staff 

ED 568 Adult Education in Agriculture. Preq.: ED 411 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Designed to meet the needs of leaders in adult education. Opportunity to study some of the 
basic problems and values in working with adult groups. Attention will be given to the 
problem of fitting the educational program for adults into the public school program and 
other educational programs as well as to the methods of teaching adults. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 570 Foundations of Mathematics Education. Preq.: ED 471 or equivalent. 3(3-0) 
Sum. A course on the current status of mathematics education with special emphasis on the 
critical study of current practices in mathematics instruction from elementary school 
through college. Kolb 

ED 575 Foundations of Science Education. Preq.: ED 475 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S, Sum. 
Philosophical, historical, sociological, political and economic relationships affecting science 
education in U. S. schools will be analyzed and evaluated. Psychological theory will be ap- 
plied to the teaching and learning processes. Emphasis will be directed toward developing 
skills in planning educational objectives, instructional strategies and evaluation procedures. 
Multiple positions will be examined regarding current trends, issues, and problems in science 
education. Graduate Staff 

ED 580 Evaluation Theory and Practice in Education. Preq.: ED 532 or equivalent. 3(3- 
0) F. A review of educational program evaluation with emphasis on (1) theory and conceptual 
models of evaluation, (2) evaluation design, and (3) environmental practical factors influenc- 
ing the design and implementation of evaluation studies. Graduate Staff 

ED 590 Special Problems in Guidance. Preqs.: Six hours grad. work in department or 
equivalent and CI. Maximum 6 F,S. Intended for individual or group studies of one or more 
of the major problems in guidance and personnel work. Problems will be selected to meet the 
interests of individuals. The workshop procedure will be used whereby special projects, 
reports, and research will be developed by individuals and by groups. Graduate Staff 

ED 591 Special Problems in Industrial Education. Preqs.: Six hours grad. credit, per- 
mission of program coordinator. Maximum 6 F,S. Directed study to provide individualized 
study and analysis in specialized areas of trade, industrial or technical subjects. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 592 Special Problems in Mathematics Teaching. Preq.: ED 471 or equivalent. 1-3 
Sum. An in-depth investigation of topical problems in mathematics teaching chosen from the 
areas of curriculum, methodology, facilities, supervision and research. Graduate Staff 

ED 593 Special Problems in Agricultural Education. Preq.: ED 411 or equivalent. 
Credits Arranged. F,S. Opportunities for students to study current problems under the 
guidance of the staff. Graduate Staff 

ED 594 Special Problems in Science Teaching. Preq.: ED 476 or equivalent. 1-3 Sum. An 
investigation of current problems in science teaching with emphasis on areas in curriculum, 
methodology, facilities, supervision and research. Specific problems studied in depth. Oppor- 
tunities will be provided to initiate research studies. Graduate Staff 

ED (IA) 595 Industrial Arts Workshop. Preq.: One or more years of teaching experience. 
3(3-0) Sum. A course for experienced teachers, administrators and supervisors of industrial 
arts. The primary purpose will be to develop sound principles and practices for initiating, 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 125 

conducting and evaluating programs in this field. Enrollees will pool their knowledge and 
practical experiences and will do intensive research work on individual and group programs. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 596 Topical Problems in Adult and Community College Education. Preq.: Grad. 
standing. Credits Arranged. F.S.Sum. Study and scientific analysis of problems in adult 
education, and preparation of a scholarly research type of paper. Graduate Staff 

ED 597 Special Problems in Education. Preqs.: Grad. standing and CI. 1-3 F.S.Sum. 
Designed to provide graduate students in education opportunity to study problem areas in 
professional education under the direction of a member of the graduate faculty. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 598 Special Problems in Curriculum and Instruction. Preq.: Six hours of ED or 
PSY. 1-6 F.S.Sum. Designed to provide an in-depth study of topical problems in curriculum 
and instruction selected from the areas of current concern to practitioners in education. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 599 Research Projects in Education. Preqs.: CI; ED 532 or equivalent. 1-3 F,S,Sum. A 
project or problem in research in education for graduate students, supervised by members of 
the graduate faculty. The research will be chosen on the basis of individual students' in- 
terests and is not to be part of thesis or dissertation research. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 600 Organizational Concepts and Theories Applied to Adult and Community 
College Education. Preqs.: ED 503, PS 502, SOC 541. 3(3-0) F. This course is designed for 
present and potential administrators interested in increasing their understanding of 
organization as a basis for administering effective adult and community college education 
programs. Graduate Staff 

ED 601 Administrative Concepts and Theories Applied to Adult and Community 
College Education. Preq.: ED 600 or a comparable course(s) on organizational theory. 3(3-0) 
S. Designed for persons interested in building a more consistent philosophy of educational 
administration, extending and strengthening their understanding of administrative concepts 
and processes, improving their comprehension of the theoretical and research foundations 
upon which administrative processes are predicated, and increasing their ability to apply ad- 
ministrative concepts, theories and principles to the management of the complex education 
system. Graduate Staff 

ED 602 Curriculum. Preqs.: PSY 510, 535; ED 503 and/or a comparable course in oc 
cupational education. 3(3-0) S. Development of the conceptual tools and intellectual skills 
needed to develop and critically assess curricula in all education fields. Study of the process 
of curriculum development including identification and formulation of education objectives, 
selection of learning experiences, evaluation of learning experiences and assessment of 
educational outcomes, and staff leader involvement in the process. Parramore 

ED 603 Teaching Mathematics and Science in Higher Education. Preqs.: ED 570, 592 or 
594, grad. standing, CI. 3(3-0) F. Collegiate mathematics and science instruction is examined 
with respect to goals and objectives, design of courses and curricula, innovative programs 
and facilities, and methods and materials for instruction. Graduate Staff 

ED 604 Curriculum Development and Evaluation in Science and Mathematics. Preqs.: 
500-level statistics, ED 615 or PSY 535, CI. 3(3-0) S. A critical study of the elements of 
curriculum design and theory in mathematics education and science education and the ex- 
amination of evaluation procedures for assessing educational innovations. 

Graduate Staff 



126 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ED 605 Education and Supervision of Teachers of Mathematics and Science. Preqs.: 
ED 470 or 475 or equivalent, ED 570 or 592 or 594. 3(3-0) S. The study and development of 
programs and techniques to promote effective improvement and alteration of the teaching 
behavior of science and mathematics teachers. Graduate Staff 

ED 608 Supervision of Vocational and Industrial Arts Education. Preqs.: ED 527, 554, 
609, 630 or equivalents. 3(3-0) F,S. An intensive study of the principles of supervision and the 
applications of these principles to the occupational education programs being conducted in 
secondary, postsecondary and adult facilities. Emphasis is placed upon the competencies 
needed in supervisors in order to effectively discharge their responsibilities in such areas as 
teacher selection, teacher transfer and promotion, assistance in teacher professional growth, 
the conduct of workshops and in-service programs for professional and non-professional 
staff, self-evaluative processes in education, curriculum generation and modification, 
guidance and counseling provisions, and action research. Hanson, Graduate Staff 

ED 609 Planning and Organizing Technical Education Programs. Preqs.: ED 344, 420, 
440, 516 and PSY 304. 3(3-0) F,S. In this course a study will be made of the influences which 
impinge upon the development of programs of occupational education. Adequate opportunity 
will also be provided to examine in detail steps that may be taken to analyze needs for oc- 
cupational education, to organize for its provision, to study its offerings, and to evaluate its 
results. Hanson, Graduate Staff 

ED 610 Administration of Vocational and Industrial Arts Education. Preqs.: ED 527, 
554, 609, 630 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. An intensive study of the major elements of ad- 
ministrative practice applied to occupational education, as it is being conducted in com- 
prehensive high schools, comprehensive community colleges, technical institutes and area 
vocational centers. Emphasis is placed upon leadership, personnel management, instruc- 
tional program management and evaluation, public relations and financial management, in 
connection with preparatory, part-time, supplementary, extension and adult education 
programs of occupational education. Hanson, Graduate Staff 

ED 611 Laws, Regulations and Policies Affecting Vocational Education. Preqs.: ED 
527, 610 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. A detailed study of legislation (national and state) which 
applies directly to occupational education. Basic social issues and economic conditions which 
precipitated the legislation will be studied in depth. A review will also be made of the 
organizational structure and policies under which national legislation is converted into 
programs of occupational education. Graduate Staff 

ED 612 Finance, Accounting and Management of Vocational Education Programs. 

Preqs.: ED 527, 610 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. A study of the steps which must be taken in 
financing a new occupational enterprise, following the determination of curriculum by area 
study. All financial transactions such as costs of operation, equipment purchase procedures, 
and costs for construction will be investigated in detail. Graduate Staff 

ED 614 Contemporary Educational Thought. Preqs.: Twelve hours ED; CI. 3(3-0) S. This 
course will be based on a reading and discussion of twentieth-century works in educational 
philosophy. Such movements as pragmatism, reconstructionism, perennialism, and existen- 
tialism will be considered. Graduate Staff 

ED 620 Cases in Educational Administration. Preqs.: Grad. standing and CI. 3(3-0) S. 
This course utilizes the case study and case simulation approach to the study of school ad- 
ministration. Administrative concepts will be developed and applied to simulated situations 
and to actual case histories. The administrative process is viewed as a decision-making 
process. The student will be expected to make decisions after considering alternative courses 
of action and after projecting probable consequences. Dolce 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 127 

ED 621 Internship in Education. Preqs.: Nine credit hours in grad. level courses and CI. 
3-9 F,S,Sum. Utilizing the participant-observer role, this course requires participation in 
selected educational situations with emphasis upon development of observational skills, 
ability to record relevant observations by means of written journals, skills in analyzing ex- 
periences identifying critical incidents, and prediction of events and consequences. The stu- 
dent is required to develop possible alternative courses of action in various situations, select 
one of the alternatives and evaluate the consequences of the course of action selected. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 630 Philosophy of Industrial Arts. Preq.: Twelve hours in ED. 2(2-0) F,S. Origins, 
development of industrial arts education. Philosophical foundations, derivation of objectives 
and criteria for evaluation. Contributions of the heritage to contemporary concepts of in- 
dustrial arts education. Graduate Staff 

ED 631 Vocational Development Theory- Preq.: Six hours in ED or PSY. 3(3-0) F. A 
study of the major theories and constructs of vocational development with implications for 
counseling and career planning. Jones 

ED 632 Applied Research Methods in Education. Preqs.: ST 507 and ED 532 or 

equivalent; Coreq.: ST 508 or CI. 3(1-4) S. Through the use of simulated educational settings 
consideration will be given to the development of research proposals or plans, selection 
and/or development of appropriate measurement instruments and the purposes and func- 
tions of various statistical designs and procedures. Simulated data will be prepared and 
analyzed using computer-based statistical packages, the results will be interpreted, and a 
research report will be produced. Graduate Staff 

ED 633 Development and Coordination of School Guidance Programs. Preqs.: ED 520 
or ED 534; ED 524; ED 530; or CI; Coreq.: ED 533. 3(3-0) S,Sum. A study of the tasks of 
organizing, coordinating, evaluating, and changing school guidance programs by school coun- 
selors. Included are the study of goals, objectives, values, functions and evaluations as they 
are related to program development in the secondary and elementary school. Jones 

ED 635 Administration and Supervision of Industrial Arts. Preqs.: Twelve hours in ED. 
2(2-0) F,S. Study of the problems and techniques of administration and supervision of in- 
dustrial arts in schools and universities. Selection of teachers, teacher improvement 
methods, public relations, facilities planning and specification. Graduate Staff 

ED 636 Observation and Supervised Field Work. Preq.: CI. Maximum 3 F,S. Provides 
opportunity for observation and practice of guidance and personnel services in schools, in- 
stitutions of higher education, agencies, business and industry. Graduate Staff 

ED 640 Laboratory Experiences in Counseling. Preqs.: ED 520 or equivalent; PSY 535; 
Coreq.: ED 530. 3(3-0) F,S. The identification and practice of fundamental skills needed for a 
person to function as an effective counselor. Emphasized is development of specific skills in: 
counseling, testing, human relations, identification of client problems, and the design of 
counseling strategies. Graduate Staff 

ED 641A Practicum in Counseling. Preqs.: Advanced grad. standing, CI. 2-6 F,S. A prac- 
ticum course in which the student participates in actual counseling experience under super- 
vision in a school, college, or agency setting. Giaduate Staff 

ED 641B Practicum in Reading. Preqs.: ED 545 or ED 546 and ED 547. 1-6 S. Practicum 
design to meet the particular needs of students enrolled. It may involve diagnosis of student 
abilities, design of a remedial program based on hypothesis concerning student abilities, im- 
plementation and evaluation of a remedial reading program, or the design of a reading clinic. 

Fox 



128 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ED 64 1C Practicum in Special Education. Preq.: CI. 1-6 F,S. Practicum will be designed 
to meet the individual needs of the students enrolled in the course. The practicum may in- 
volve diagnosis of exceptional students, writing educational prescriptive plans for excep- 
tional students, or it may focus on an individual topic that involves working directly with ex- 
ceptional learners. Mahmoud 

ED 64 ID Practicum in Science and Mathematics Education. Preq.: ED 570 or ED 575. 
1-6 F,S. This course is a supervised practicum in appropriate settings both on- and off- 
campus which provides an opportunity for evaluation development and implementation of 
an instructional program in science and mathematics in a clinical environment under close 
faculty supervision. Graduate Staff 

ED (IA) 660 Industrial Arts Curriculum. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. (See industrial arts education, 
page 112.) 

ED 664 Supervision in Agricultural Education. Preq.: ED 563 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Organization, administration, evaluation and possible improvement of supervisory practice; 
theory, principles and techniques of effective supervision in agricultural education at dif- 
ferent levels. Graduate Staff 

ED 665 Supervising Student Teaching. Preq.: Twelve hours of ED. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. A 
study of the program of student teaching in teacher education. Special consideration will be 
given the role of the supervising teacher, including the following areas: planning for effective 
student teaching, observation and orientation, school community study, analysis of situa- 
tion, evaluating student teachers and coordination with North Carolina State University. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 666 Supervision of Counseling. Preq.: CI. 3(1-8) F,S. A supervised practicum for doc- 
toral students in assisting with the supervision of first-year students in laboratory and prac- 
ticum experiences in counseling. Graduate Staff 

ED 688 Research Application in Occupational Education. Preq.: ED 615. 3(3-0) F,S. 
This course will be concerned with methodology, application, analysis and synthesis of 
research in occupational education. A review of current occupational education studies, 
clustered by areas, will be made with attention to statistical techniques, data collecting, data 
handling, and the audience and impact of particular projects and research organizations. The 
class activities in research application are designed to bridge the gap between the theories of 
research methodology and the student's independent research projects. 

Coster, Graduate Staff 

ED 689 Evaluation in Occupational Education. Preqs.: ED 615, ST 513. 3(3-0) F. This 
course will be concerned with the conceptual and methodological aspects of occupational 
education evaluation, with attention to techniques for determining empirically the extent to 
which educational goals are being achieved, to locate the barriers to the advancement of 
these goals and to discover the consequences of educational programs. Coster 

ED 690 Seminar in Mathematics Education. Preq.: Departmental major or CI. 2(2-0) 
F,S. An in-depth examination and analysis of the literature and research in a particular 
topic(s) in mathematics education. Graduate Staff 

ED 691 Seminar in Industrial Education. Preq.: Grad. standing or CI. 1(1-0) F,S. 
Reviews and reports of special interest to graduate students in industrial and technical 
education. The course will be offered in accordance with the availability of distinguished 
professors and in response to indicated needs of the graduate students. Hanson 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 129 

ED 692 Seminar in Industrial Arts Education. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) F,S. 
Reviews and reports on special topics of interest to students in industrial arts education. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 693 Advanced Problems in Agricultural Education. Preq.: ED 554 or equivalent. 
Credits Arranged. F,S. Study of current and advanced problems in the teaching and ad- 
ministration of educational programs, evaluation of procedures and consideration for im- 
proving. Graduate Staff 

ED 694 Seminar in Agricultural Education. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0), Maximum 2 
F,S. A critical review of current problems, articles and books of interest to students of 
agricultural education. Graduate Staff 

ED 695 Seminar in Science Education. Preq.: Department major or CI. 2(2-0) F,S. An in- 
depth examination and analysis of the literature and research in a particular topic(s) in 
science education. Graduate Staff 

ED 696 Seminar in Adult and Community College Education. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 
F,S. Identification and scientific analysis of major issues and problems relevant to adult 
education. Credit for this course will involve the active participation of the student in a for- 
mal seminar and the scientific appraisal and solution of a selected problem. The course is 
designed to help the student acquire a broad perspective of issues confronting adult 
educators and to acquire experiences in the scientific analysis and solution of specific issues. 

Graduate Staff 

ED (PSY) 697 Advanced Seminar in Research Design. Preq.: Nine hours statistical 
methods and research or CI, advanced grad. status. 3(3-0) S. A seminar-type course with 
topics selected in accordance with the interests and needs of the students. Attention to the 
research strategies that underlie educational and psychological research, to the development 
of theoretical constructs, to a critical review of research related to problems of student in- 
terest, and to a systematic analysis and critique of students' research problems. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 698 Seminar in Occupational Education. Preqs.: Nine hours of occupational educa- 
tion or CI; advanced grad. status. 3(3-0) F,S. This course will be designed as a seminar-type 
course, with topics selected each semester. Attention will be given to the broad concepts of 
occupational education as manifested in the Vocational Education Act of 1963 and its amend- 
ments, and to the problems and issues underlying the development of and implementation of 
programs of occupational education at elementary, junior high, senior high, and postsecon- 
dary levels. Coster 

ED 699 Thesis and Dissertation Research. Preqs.: 15 hours; CI. Credits Arranged. 
F,S,Sum. Individual research on a thesis or dissertation problem. Graduate Staff 



Electrical Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor L. K. Monteith, Head 

Professor W. D. Stevenson Jr., Associate Head and Graduate Administrator 

Professors: W. J. Barclay, W. Chou, A. R. Eckels, W. A. Flood, J. R. Hauser, M. A. 
Littlejohn, N. F. J. Matthews, J. B. O'Neal Jr., D. R. Rhodes, J. Staudhammer, F. 



130 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

J. Tischer; Professor Emeritus: G. B. Hoadley; Adjunct Professors: H. E. Brown, 
J. J. Wortman; Associate Professors: N. R. Bell, J. W. Gault, T. H. Glisson, A. J. 
Goetze, J. J. Grainger, J. F. Kauffman, E. G. Manning, W. C. Peterson, R. W. 
Stroh; Adjunct Associate Professors: E. Christian, J. R. Suttle, M. G. Zaalouk; 
Visitiyig Associate Professor: S. E. Bedair; Assistant Professors: W. A. Gruver, 
W. E. Snyder, R. J. Trew; Adjunct Assistant Professors: J. W. Harrison, A. Jai, 
H. R. Wittmann; Visiting Assistant Professor: S. H. Lee 

The Department of Electrical Engineering offers the degrees of Master of Elec- 
trical Engineering, Master of Science with or without a thesis, and Doctor of 
Philosophy. Areas of emphasis are applied electromagnetics, communications, 
computer engineering, power systems, solid state electronics, and system control. 

The Master of Electrical Engineering degree requires a design project which may 
account for three to six credits. A specified number of design courses from an ap- 
proved list must be included in the student's program of courses. The student must 
also pass a comprehensive oral examination. 

Four core courses from an approved list are required for the Master of Science 
degree without a thesis, and the student must pass a comprehensive oral examina- 
tion. 

The Master of Science degree with thesis has no specified course requirements, 
but the student must pass a comprehensive oral examination. The thesis may ac- 
count for as many as six semester hours. 

In the more advanced study for the doctorate, a comprehensive understanding of 
several of the fields listed earlier as areas of emphasis in electrical engineering is 
required, and specialization appears in part of the course program and in the 
research problem undertaken. 

Advanced courses of a general and fundamental nature are required for those 
who plan to carry their advanced studies to the level of the doctorate. Minor 
sequences of study in advanced mathematics, physics or other appropriate dis- 
ciplines are planned to fit individual needs. 

The laboratories in the department are well equipped for research in communica- 
tions, computers, electromagnetics, solid-state materials and devices, automatic 
control, and power systems. Research is in progress in these and other areas. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

EE 406 Dynamical Systems Analysis. Preqs.: EE 202 or 331, ESM 305, MA 301. 3(3-0) F. 

EE 431 Electronics Engineering. Preq.: EE 314. 3(2-3) F. 

EE 432 Communication Engineering. Preq.: EE 431. 3(2-3) S. 

EE 433 Electric Power Engineering. Preq.: EE 305 or 332. 3(2-3) S. 

EE 434 Power System Analysis. Preq.: EE 305. 3(3-0) F. 

EE 435 Elements of Control. Preqs.: EE 305, EE 314. 3(2-3) F. 

EE 441 Introduction to Electron Devices. Preqs.: MA 301, PY 208. 3(3-0) S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 131 

EE 442 Introduction to Solid-State Devices. Preqs.: EE 441 or PY 407, MA 301. 3(3-0) S. 

EE 443 Digital Systems Design. Preq.: EE 340. 3(2-3) F. 

EE 445 Introduction to Antennas. Preqs.: EE 303, EE 314. 3(2-3) F. 

EE 448 Introduction to Microwaves. Preqs.: EE 303, EE 314. 3(2-3) S. 

EE 492 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering. Preq.: Jr. standing. 3(3-0 or 0-9) F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

EE 503 Computer- Aided Circuit Analysis. Preqs.: EE 314, 301, B average in EE and MA. 
3(3-0) F. Analysis of electrical circuits with emphasis on computer methods. Steady-state 
and transient analysis of linear and nonlinear networks; tolerance analysis; programming 
considerations. Staudhammer 



EE 504 Introduction to Network Synthesis. Preqs.: EE 301, B average in EE and MA. 
3(3-0) S. A study of the properties of network functions and the development of the methods 
of network synthesis of one-port and two-port passive structures. Introduction to active RC 
filters. Stroh 

EE 511 Electronic Circuits. Preqs.: EE 314, B average in EE and MA. 3(3-0) S. A study of 
circuit and system applications of analog devices and integrated circuits. Performance 
characteristics and limitations of a wide variety of analog electronic devices and circuits will 
be considered. Selected laboratory projects are used to provide direct experience in advanced 
analog electronics. Manning, Hauser 

EE 512 Communication Theory. Preqs.: EE 301, B average in EE and MA. 3(3-0) F. Com- 
munication signals in the frequency and time domains. Probability and associated functions, 
random signal theory, modulation and frequency translation, noise, sampling theory, 
correlation functions, and information theory. Accent on methods and problems unique to 
the field of digital communication. (Offered F every year, Sum. 1980 and S 1980.) 

Graduate Staff 

EE 516 Feedback Control Systems. Preqs.: EE 435 or EE 301, B average in EE and MA. 
3(3-0) S. Introduction to analysis and design of continuous and discrete-time dynamical con- 
trol systems. Emphasis on linear, single-input-single-output systems using state variable 
and transfer function methods. Topics include open and closed-loop representation; analog 
and digital simulation; time and frequency response; stability by Routh-Hurwitz, Nyquist, 
and Liapunov methods; performance specifications; cascade and state variable compensa- 
tion. Assignments utilize computer-aided analysis and design programs. Gruver 

EE 517 Control Laboratory. Coreq.: EE 516. 1(0-3) F,S. Study of dynamical system 
models and multivariable control applications based on scheduled experiments and indepen- 
dent projects selected to contribute to a better understanding of the topics treated in EE 516, 
E (OR) 531, EE 613, 614, and E (OR) 650. Graduate Staff 

EE 520 Fundamentals of Logic Systems. Preqs.: EE 340, B average in EE and MA. 3(3-0) 
F. A study of algebraic structures as related to logic systems, models for switching circuit 
behavior and their relation to hardware implementation. Includes theoretical treatment of 
both combinational and sequential logic systems concepts. (Offered F every year, Sum. 1978 
and S 1980.) Graduate Staff 



132 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

EE 521 Digital Computer Technology and Design. Preq.: EE 520. 3(3-0) S. A study of the 
internal structure and organization of digital systems with the computer as a primary focus. 
The emphasis is on problem description and modeling as required in the design process. The 
design of all major components in digital systems, including memory, input-output, and con- 
trol utilizing current technology, will be discussed. Graduate Staff 

EE 530 Physical Electronics. 1 reqs.: EE 304, B average in EE and MA. 3(3-0) F. A study 
of the properties of charged particles under the influence of fields and in solid materials. 
Quantum mechanics, particle statistics, semi-conductor properties, fundamental particle 
transport properties and lasers. (Offered F every year, Sum. 1981 and S 1979.) 

Graduate Staff 

EE 533 Integrated Circuits. Preqs.: EE 314, B average in EE and MA. 3(3-0) S. A study of 
the implementation of solid state circuits in integrated form. Includes bipolar and MOS 
technologies and their application with emphasis on digital systems. Snyder 

EE 540 Electromagnetic Fields and Waves. Preqs.: EE 304, B average in EE and MA. 
3(3-0) F. Basic laws and concepts of static and dynamic electromagnetic fields. Fundamental 
equations and their applications. Fundamentals, forms and applications of Maxwell's equa- 
tions. Vector and scalar potentials, relativistic aspects of fields, energy and power. Waves in 
unbounded and bounded regions, radiation, waveguides and resonators. Geometrical and 
physical optics. (Offered F every year, S 1981 and Sum. 1979.) Graduate Staff 

EE 545 Introduction to Radio Wave Propagation. Preqs.: EE 304, B average in EE and 
MA. 3(3-0) S. Characteristics of plane electromagnetic waves in homogeneous and non- 
homegeneous media with application to tropospheric and ionospheric propagation. 
Relationships between electron density, collision frequency and complex refractive index, 
theory of the formation and dynamics of ionospheric layers and theorems for the prediction 
of ionospheric propagation. Flood 

EE (PY) 552 Introduction to the Structure of Solids. 3(3-0) S. (See physics, page 210.) 

EE (MAE) 565 Gas Lasers. 3(3-0) F,S. (See mechanical and aerospace engineering, page 
186.) 

EE 591, 592 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering. Preq.: B average in technical sub- 
jects. 3(3-0) F,S. A two-semester sequence to develop new courses and to allow qualified stu- 
dents to explore areas of special interest. Graduate Staff 

EE 593 Individual Topics in Electrical Engineering. Preq.: B average in technical sub- 
jects. 1-3 F,S. A course providing an opportunity for individual students to explore topics of 
special interest under the direction of a member of the faculty. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

EE 611 Digital Signal Processing. Preqs.: EE 512, knowledge of FORTRAN. 3(3-0) S. A 
study of the digital processing of analog signals that have been sampled and quantized. 
Topics covered include A/D and D/A conversion, digital filters, spectral analysis, waveform 
estimation (Wiener-Kalman filters), and signal detection. Glisson, Stroh 

EE 613, 614 Advanced Feedback Control. Preq.: EE 516. 3(3-0) F,S. The study of advan- 
ced topics in dynamical systems and multivariate control. Current research and recent 
developments in the field will be treated. Gruver 

EE 616 Microwave Electronics. Preq.: EE 540. 3(3-0) S. Limitations imposed by fre- 
quency on electronic devices and circuits. Microwave power generation, amplification, and 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 133 

control using solid-state, vacuum and plasma devices. Measurements and application in the 
microwave spectrum. Barclay 

EE 617 Pulse and Digital Circuits. Preq.: EE 533. 3(3-0) S. Integrated and discrete circuit 
techniques for the production, shaping and control of nonsinusoidal wave forms. Fundamen- 
tal circuits and systems needed in digital information systems, instrumentation and com- 
puters. Barclay 

EE 618 Antennas and Radiation. Preq.: EE 540. 3(3-0) S. A research course in radiating 
electromagnetic systems. Physical principles of analysis and synthesis of antennas as 
derived from the Maxwell theory of electromagnetism. Investigation of radiative and reac- 
tive properties. Conditions for physical realizability. Construction of realizable aperture dis- 
tributions and space factors. (Offered alt. years.) Rhodes 

EE 619 Applied Electromagnetic Fields and Waves. Preq.: EE 540. 3(3-0) S. A study of 
networks at frequencies above 100 MHz. General waveguides and resonators as elements of 
transmission systems, circuitry, and components. Fundamentals of guided waves and their 
applications. Network elements, resonators, and filters with distributed parameters. Optical 
waveguides (fiber optics). Integration with active devices in mixers, multipliers, oscillators, 
and parametric devices. Tischer 

EE 622 Electronic Properties of Solid-State Materials. Preq.: EE 530. 3(3-0) F. A review 
of energy bands in semiconductors. Detailed treatment of thermal and electrical transport 
phenomena, equilibrium and non-equilibrium semiconductor statistics. Also optical proper- 
ties and hot electron effects in solid-state materials. Hauser, Littlejohn 

EE 624 Electronic Properties of Solid-State Devices. Preq.: EE 530. 3(3-0) S. Physical 
properties of devices, I-V characteristics, power and frequency limitations, and small signal 
equivalent circuits of diodes, bipolar transistors, junction FET's, Schottky barrier FET's, 
MOS transistors, and charge coupled devices. (Offered alt years.) Hauser 

EE 625 Advanced Solid-State Device Theory. Preq.: EE 624. 3(3-0) F. A study of the 
latest development in solid-state devices. The properties of metal-insulator-semiconductor 
devices, high-field devices and optical devices. Emphasis on the basic fundamental physical 
principles of operation as opposed to circuit applications. (Offered alt. years.) Hauser 

EE 640 Advanced Logic Circuits. Preq.: EE 520. 3(3-0) S. A study of state-of-the-art con- 
cepts in the area of digital systems. The theoretical and technological results and trends as 
indicated by the current literature will be studied. This course is intended to provide un- 
derstanding of current advanced concepts as well as provide research background. 

Graduate Staff 

EE 641 Sequential Machines. Preq.: EE 520. 3(3-0) F. The study of finite automata, both 
synchronous and asynchronous. Machine equivalence and minimization, state identification 
and the state assignment problem. Flip-flop activation from the state diagram and other 
realization techniques. Gault, Staudhammer 

EE 642 Automata and Adaptive Systems. Preq.: EE 520. 3(3-0) S. The study of neural 
nets in natural systems, artificial nerve nets, artificial intelligence, goal-directed behavior, 
the logic of automata and adaptive Boolean logic. Computability, Turing machines and recur- 
sive function theory. Graduate Staff 

EE 651 Statistical Communication Theory. Preq.: EE 512 or MA (ST) 541. 3(3-0) S. 
Waveform analysis including Fourier transforms, correlation functions and other statistical 
descriptions of stationary and non-stationary random processes. Weiner theory; prediction, 



134 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

estimation and smoothing of discrete and continuous signals; introduction to Kalman filter- 
ing; problems to illustrate the applications of the theory to speech, television and data com- 
munication systems. Glisson, Stroh, O'Neal 

EE 652 Information Theory. Preq.: EE 512. 3(3-0) F. Definition of a measure of informa- 
tion and a study of its properties, information sources and their efficient representation, 
communication channels and their capacity, encoding and decoding of data for transmission 
over noisy channels, source encoding systems, error correcting codes, rate distortion bounds. 
(Offered 1979-80 and alt. years.) O'Neal, Stroh 

EE 654 Communication Systems Analysis. Preq.: EE 512. 3(3-0) S. Tools for the analysis 
of RF and optical communication systems— information symbols, communication path, in- 
formation content, and entropy and redundancy of an information source. Properties of the 
communication channel including propagation media and losses, antennas, signal processing 
and signal quality. The analysis of terrestrial, extra terrestrial and hydrospace systems. 

Flood 

EE 655 Wave Phenomena in Plasma. Preq.: EE 540. 3(3-0) S. Discussion, demonstration, 
and analysis of wave phenomena and oscillations in plasma. Electron and ion orbits, plasma 
characteristics and their derivation. Statistical particle dynamics and wave interaction. 
Plasma diagnostics. Laboratory demonstrations of field interactions, oscillations and waves. 
Applications in energy conversion and generation. (Offered alt. years.) Tischer 

EE 659 Pattern Recognition. Preq.: EE 512. 3(3-0) F. A study of pattern recognition 
techniques, including discriminant functions, parametric and nonparametric training 
methods, classification schemes; discriminant analysis, clustering techniques. Recent techni- 
ques in computer-based image processing are stressed. Snyder 

EE 691, 692 Special Studies in Electrical Engineering. 3(3-0) F,S. An opportunity for 
small groups of advanced graduate students to study topics in their special fields of interest 
under the direction of members of the graduate faculty. Graduate Staff 

EE 693 Individual Studies in Electrical Engineering. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F,S. The 
study of advanced topics of special interest to individual students under the direction of 
faculty members. Graduate Staff 

EE 695 Electrical Engineering Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing in EE. 1(1-0) F,S. A series 
of papers and conferences participated in by the instructional staff, invited guests and stu- 
dents who are candidates for advanced degrees. Graduate Staff 

EE 698 Electrical Engineering Design Project. Preq.: Grad. standing in EE. 3-6 F,S. A 
course in which a student, or a group of students working as a team, will design and usually 
build, test, and evaluate an electrical device, system, or process. A written engineering report 
is required. The oral examination of a candidate for the degree of Master of Electrical 
Engineering will include questioning on this course. Graduate Staff 

EE 699 Electrical Engineering Research. Preqs.: Grad. standing in EE, consent of ad- 
visor. Credits arranged. Graduate Staff 



Engineering 

These courses are designed for use by graduate students in any department in 
the School of Engineering. (See pages 205-207 for course descriptions.) 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 135 

E (OR) 531 Dynamical Systems and Multivariate Control. Preqs.: MA 301, 405 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) F. 

E (OR) 650 Algorithmic Methods in Optimal Control. Preq.: OR 629 or equivalent; 
Coreq.: Knowledge of higher level language (e.g., Fortran or PLl). 3(3-0) Alt. S. 



English 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor L. S. Champion, Head 

Professor R. B. White Jr., Assistant Head 

Professor J. D. Durant, Director of the Graduate Program 

Professors: M. Halperen, A. S. Knowles, B. G. Koonce Jr., F. H. Moore, G. Owen 
Jr., W. B. Toole III, M. C.Williams, P. Williams Jr.; Professors Emeriti: L. C. Har- 
tley, H. G. Kincheloe, R. G. Walser; Associate Professors: L. J. Betts Jr., P. E. 
Blank Jr., J. W. Clark Jr., E. D. Clark, E. P. Dandridge Jr., H. A. Hargrave, L. F. 
Jeffers, M. T. Hester, D. L. Laryea, W. E. Meyers, C. E. Moore, M. S. Reynolds, 
D. D. Short, N. G. Smith, J. J. Smoot, A. F. Stein, T. N. Walters, H. C. West; 
Assistayit Professors: B. J. Baines, E. D. Engel, J. M. Grimwood, A. H. Harrison, 
L. T. Holley, J. A. Kilby, V. B. Lentz, L. H. MacKethan, J. N. Wall, R. V. Young 

The Department of English offers instruction leading to the Master of Arts 
degree with specialization in English and American Literature. The program is 
designed either to provide the student with a terminal course of study or to serve as 
the first year toward a doctorate. A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate 
credit is required, though the program may be expanded to meet the needs of in- 
dividual students. 

The student who holds "A" certification from the N. C. Department of Public In- 
struction may pursue a Master of Arts with Graduate Certification. This program 
involves a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate credit in English and nine 
semester hours of graduate credit in education. 

Assistantships for promising students are available. These students will take 
ENG 504 in the fall semester and, under supervision, devote half time in the fall 
and spring semesters to the teaching of courses in freshman composition. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ENG 504 Problems in College Composition. Preq.: Appointment as teaching assistant in 
English. F. Directed study of the development of rhetorical skills in composition in 
classroom situations. Smith 

NOTE: The prerequisite for all 500-level English courses is upper division or graduate 
standing. 



136 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ENG 561 Milton. 3(3-0) S. An intensive reading of Milton with attention to background 
materials in the history and culture of seventeenth-century England. F. Moore, White 

ENG 575 Southern Writers. 3(3-0) S. A survey of the particular contribution of the South 
to American literature, with intensive study of selected major figures. 

MacKethan, Laryea 

ENG 578 English Drama to 1642. 3(3-0) F. Intensive study of the English drama from its 
liturgical beginnings to the closing of the theatres, excluding Shakespeare. 

M. Williams, Meyers 

ENG 579 Restoration and 18th-Century Drama. 3(3-0) S. Intensive study of the English 
drama from 1660 to 1800. (Offered in 1980.) Durant 

ENG 590 Literary Criticism. 3(3-0) S. An examination of the critical process as it leads to 
the definition and analysis of literature, together with attention to the main literary tradi- 
tions and conventions. P. Williams 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

NOTE: The prerequisite for all 600-level English courses is graduate standing unless ad- 
ditional prerequisites are noted. 

ENG 609 Old English Literature. 3(3-0) F,S. An introduction to the language and 
literature of the Old English period (450-1100). Readings will be in the original and will in- 
clude both poetry and prose. (Offered in F 1978, S 1980.) Short 

ENG 610 Middle English Literature. 3(3-0) F. A study of major works of medieval 
English literature (exclusive of Chaucer) in the light of dominant intellectual and artistic 
traditions: emphasis is on four works: Piers Plowman, Pearl, Sir Gawain and the Green 
Knight, and Malory's Morte Darthur. (Offered in 1978.) Koonce 

ENG 615 American Colonial Literature. 3(3-0) F. A study of American literature and 
thought from the beginning to the adoption of the Constitution. (Offered in 1979.) 

J. Clark 

ENG 620 16th-century Non-Dramatic English Literature. 3(3-0) F. A detailed survey of 
non-dramatic prose and verse of the sixteenth century against the background of Humanism 
with the consequent assimilation of classical and continental literary subjects and forms. 

Blank 

ENG 624 Modern English Usage. 3(3-0) S. An intensive study of English grammar, with 
attention to new developments in structural linguistics and with emphasis on current usage. 
(Offered in 1979.) Meyers, Short 

ENG 626 History of the English Language. 3(3-0) F. A survey of the growth and develop- 
ment of the language from its Indo-European beginnings to the present. (Offered in 1979.) 

Meyers, Short 

ENG 630 17th-Century English Literature. 3(3-0) S. A close examination of the literature 
of England from 1600 to 1700 with emphasis on major literary figures and movements, the 
development of important literary forms and genres, and the intimate relationship between 
the literature of this period and its philosophical, political, and theological backgrounds. 

F. Moore, White 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 137 

ENG 650 English Romantic Period. 3(3-0) F. A detailed study of the six major romantic 
poets— Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats; some attention as well to 
the political, social, and literary background and to a few minor writers and critics. 

Hargrave, P. Williams 

ENG 651 Chaucer. Preqs.: ENG 451 or equivalent and grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. An inten- 
sive study of the Chaucer canon requiring independent research. Koonce, Short 

ENG 655 American Romantic Period. 3(3-0) F. A study of the selected works of Poe, 
Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, and Thoreau, with emphasis on their varied contributions to 
the literature and thought of the American romantic movement. Stein, West 

ENG 658 Shakespeare's Tragedies. Preqs.: ENG 485 or equivalent and grad. standing. 
3(3-0) F. An intensive study — textual and critical— of Shakespeare's tragedies. 

Champion 

ENG 659 Shakespeare's Comedies. Preqs. ENG 485 or equivalent and grad. standing. 3(3- 
0) S. An intensive study— textual and critical— of Shakespeare's comedies. Champion 

ENG 660 Victorian Poetry. 3(3-0) S. Studies in the poetry of Victorian England: 1837- 
1901; the major poets, movements, and questions in their historical contexts, religious, 
political, and aesthetic. Hargrave, Harrison 

ENG 661 Victorian Non-Fiction Prose. 3(3-0) S. Studies in the non-fiction prose of Vic- 
torian England: 1830-1900. The major essayists and intellectual movements of the Victorian 
period in their religious, social, and aesthetic contexts. (Offered in 1979.) 

Hargrave, Lentz 

ENG 662 18th-century English Literature. 3(3-0) F. The major figures in English 
literature between 1660 and 1790 against the background of social, cultural, and religious 
change. Durant, White 

ENG 663 18th-century English Novel. 3(3-0) S. Selected British novels of the eighteenth 
century studied in relation to the history and development of the genre and in the light of 
available critical opinion past and present. (Offered in 1979.) Durant 

ENG 664 Victorian Novel. 3(3-0) S. The nineteenth-century British novel studied from the 
perspective of literary history and twentieth-century criticism. (Offered in 1980.) 

Engel, Lentz 

ENG 665 American Realism and Naturalism. 3(3-0) S. Concentration on Whitman, 
Dickinson, Twain, James, and Dreiser, with briefer attention to Howells, Crane, Norris, and 
other realists and naturalists. Stein, West 

ENG 670 20th-century British Prose. 3(3-0) S. An examination of the works of the major 
British writers and literary movements of this century and their historical context, religious, 
political, and aesthetic. (Offered in 1980.) Halperen 

ENG 671 20th-century British Poetry. 3(3-0) S. The development of English poetry from 
the rebellion against Victorian and Pre-Raphaelite verse to the present post-war scene; 
special attention to Hardy, Yeats, Eliot, Auden, and Thomas. (Offered in 1979.) Owen 

ENG 675 20th-century American Prose. 3(3-0) F. An examination of representative 
American writers of the novel and short fiction. (Offered in 1978.) Knowles, Reynolds 



138 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ENG 676 20th-century American Poetry. 3(3-0) F. The development of modern American 
poetry from the rebellion against the romantic and genteel verse of the 1890's; special atten- 
tion to Robinson, Frost, Pound, Williams, Stevens, and Ransom. (Offered in 1979.) 

Owen 

ENG 680 20th-century British Drama. 3(3-0) S. A survey of modern British drama from 
its beginnings at the turn of the century to the present. (Offered in 1980.) Knowles 

ENG 681 20th-century American Drama. 3(3-0) S. A survey of modern American drama 
centering on major figures. (Offered in 1979.) Halperen 

ENG 692 Special Topics in American Literature. Preq.: Consent of seminar chairman. 
3(3-0) F,S. An intensive study, involving independent research and centering on some limited 
topics from American literature. Graduate Staff 

ENG 693 Special Topics in English Literature. Preq.: Consent of seminar chairman. 3(3- 
0) F,S. An intensive study, involving independent research and centering on some limited 
topic from English literature. Graduate Staff 

ENG 698 Bibliography and Methodology. Preq.: Grad. standing with approved thesis 
topic. Credits Arranged. F,S. An investigation of the materials of literary research and 
scholarship with special focus on the student's thesis. Preparation of the earlier phases of the 
thesis project. 

Thesis Director 

ENG 699 Research in Literature (Thesis). Preq.: Consent of graduate adviser. Credits 
Arranged. F,S. Independent investigation of an advanced literary or linguistic problem 
leading to the writing of a master's thesis. Thesis Director 



Entomology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor K. L. Knight, Head 

Professors: R. C. Axtell, W. V. Campbell, W. C. Dauterman, M. H. Farrier, F. E. 
Guthrie, Ernest Hodgson, W. J. Mistric Jr., H. B. Moore Jr., H. H. Neunzig, R. L. 
Rabb, G. C. Rock, T. J. Sheets, C. F. Smith, C. G. Wright, D. A. Young; Professors 
Emeriti: C. H. Brett, T. B. Mitchell; Adjunct Professors: A. L. Chasson, J. R. 
Fouts; Extension Professors: R. L. Robertson, G. T. Weekman; Associate 
Professors: C. S. Apperson, J. R. Baker, J. R. Bradley Jr., W. M. Brooks, R. E. 
Stinner, J. W. Van Duyn, R. T. Yamamoto; Extension Associate Professor: K. A. 
Sorensen; Assistant Professors: J. T. Ambrose, F. P. Hain, G. G. Kennedy, J. R. 
Meyer; Assistant Professor (USDA): K. D. Elsey; Adjunct Assistant Professors: 
Gordon Gordh, R. M. Philpot 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 139 

ASSOCIATE MEMBER OF THE DEPARTMENT 
Professor: D. S. Grosch 

The Department of Entomology* offers graduate training leading to the Master 
of Agriculture, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Major areas of 
specialization are: acarology, agricultural entomology, behavior, biochemistry and 
toxicology, ecology, extension entomology, invertebrate pathology, medical and 
veterinary entomology, nutrition, pesticide analysis, pest management and tax- 
onomy. 

Opportunities exist for training in both applied and fundamental phases of en- 
tomology and invertebrate biology. Population management concepts are 
emphasized in the applied entomology and pest management programs. The ap- 
plied phases are influenced by the State's agriculture, in which tobacco, cotton, 
peanuts, soybeans, fruit, vegetables, livestock and forestry are important compo- 
nents. The rapidly expanding tourist industry and the diverse habitats of the State, 
extending from the mountains to the sea, provide unique opportunities for research 
on insects and related arthropods affecting man. A cooperative arrangement with 
the School of Forest Resources provides majors in forest entomology. The program 
in medical and veterinary entomology includes both applied and fundamental 
research and provides the opportunity for training at the School of Public Health, 
Chapel Hill. 

Fundamental areas are biochemistry and toxicology, physiology and behavior, 
and taxonomy. The program in biochemistry and toxicology is interdepartmental 
involving faculty from biochemistry, crop science, entomology, experimental 
statistics and genetics. Taxonomy is particularly strong in the aphids, leafhoppers, 
mites and mosquitoes. Invertebrate pathology emphasizes protozoan diseases. 
Ecology, population dynamics, behavior and nutrition are emphasized in several 
programs. 

The departmental research and training programs are housed in a complex of 
modern facilities including: a pesticide residue analysis laboratory, a pesticide 
research laboratory, comparative biochemistry and toxicology laboratories, a 
behavior laboratory, insect rearing rooms, greenhouses and field stations. An adja- 
cent phytotron or bioclimatic facility provides an opportunity for ecological and 
behavioral studies under controlled conditions. Ultrastructural investigations are 
conducted in the electron microscope facility of the School of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences. Extensive nuclear reactor and computer facilities and statistical services 
are available on campus. 

See page 21 for an account of the Pesticide Residue Research Laboratory. 



* This department does require GRE scores. 



140 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

ENT (ZO) 401. Bibliographic Research in Biology. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. or 
grad. standing. 1(1-0) F. (Offered F 1978 and alt. years.) 

Related Course: 

PM 415 Principles of Pest Management. Preqs.: ENT 312, PP 315, CS 414. 3(3-0) S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ENT 502 Insect Diversity. Preq.: Twelve hours of biology. 4(2-4) F. The external 
morphology of insects and a survey of the biology and identification of immature and adult 
insects. Evolutionary relationships of insects and other arthropods, speciation, insect 
zoogeography, nomenclature, and classical and recent approaches to systematics considered. 

Baker, Neunzig, Young 

ENT 503 Functional Systems of Insects. Preqs.: Twelve hours of biology, nine hours of 
CH, three hours of BCH, ENT 301 or equivalent. 4(2-6) S. The morphology, histology and 
function of the organ systems of insects. Sensory and general physiology lead into basic ele- 
ments of insect orientation and behavior. Campbell, Hodgson, Yamamoto 

ENT 504 Insect Morphology. Preq.: ENT 502. 3(1-4) F. External morphology, primary 
and comparative phases, with emphasis on knowledge and techniques which can be applied 
to specific problems. (Offered F 1979 and alt. years.) Young 

ENT 511 Systematic Entomology. Preq.: ENT 301 or 312. 3(1-4) F. A detailed survey of 
the orders and families of adult insects, to acquaint the student with those groups and 
develop ability in the use of the taxonomic literature. (Offered F 1978 and alt. years.) 

Young 
ENT 520 Insect Pathology. Preqs.: Introductory entomology and introductory 
microbiology. 3(2-3) S. A treatment of the noninfectious and infectious diseases of insects, 
the etiological agents and infectious processes involved, immunological responses and ap- 
plications. (Offered S 1979 and alt. years.) Brooks 

ENT 531 Insect Ecology. Preq.: ENT 502. 3(2-2) F. The environmental relations of insects, 
including insect development, habits, distribution and abundance. Stinner 

ENT 541 Immature Insects. Preq.: ENT 502 or equivalent. 2(1-3) F. An advanced study of 
the immature stages of selected orders of insects with emphasis on generic and specific taxa. 
Primary consideration of the larval stage, but a brief treatment of eggs and pupae. (Offered 
F 1978 and alt. years.) Neunzig 

ENT 542 Acarology. Preq.: ENT 301 or 312 or ZO 201. 3(2-3) S. A systematic survey of the 
mites and ticks with emphasis on identification, biology and control of the more common and 
economic forms attacking material, plants and animals including man. (Offered S 1979 and 
alt. years.) Farrier 

ENT 550 Fundamentals of Insect Control. Preq.: ENT 312 or 301. 3(2-2) F. The principles 
underlying modern methods for protecting food, clothing, shelter and health from insect at- 
tack. Guthrie 

ENT 562 Agricultural Entomology. Preq.: ENT 301 or 312. 3(2-3) S. A study of the 
biology and ecology of beneficial and injurious insects and arachnids of agricultural crops. 
Advantages and limitations of the advanced concepts for managing insect and mite popula- 
tions on different crops will be emphasized. (Offered S 1979 and alt. years.) 

Bradley, Rock 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 141 

ENT 572 Advanced Forest Entomology. Preq.: ENT 301 or ENT 502 or CI. 3(2-2) S. 
Covers the important insect pests of forest and shade trees including regeneration pests, 
defoliating insects, inner-bark borers, wood borers, sucking insects, and bud, twig and root 
feeding insects. Also includes concepts in forest pest management and population dynamics. 
(Offered S 1980 and alt. years.) Hain 

ENT (PHY, ZO) 575 Physiology of Invertebrates. 3(3-0) S. (See physiology, page 215.) 

ENT (ZO) 582 Medical and Veterinary Entomology. Preqs.: ENT 301 or 312 and ZO 315 

or equivalent. 3(2-3) S. The morphology, taxonomy, biology and control of the arthropod 
parasites and disease vectors of man and animals. The ecology and behavior of vectors in 
relation to disease transmission and control. (Offered S 1980 and alt. years.) Axtell 

ENT 590 Special Problems. Preq.: CI. Credits Arranged. F,S. Original research on special 
problems in entomology not related to a thesis problem. Provides experience and training in 
research. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ENT 622 Insect Toxicology. Preqs.: ENT 550, BCH 551 or equivalent. 3(2-3) S. The rela- 
tion of chemical structure to insect toxicity, the mode of action of toxicants used to kill in- 
sects, the metabolism of insecticides in plant and animal systems, the selectivity within the 
cholinesterase inhibitors and other selective mechanisms and the analysis of insecticide 
residues will be discussed. (Offered S 1980 and alt. years.) Dauterman, Guthrie 

ENT 690 Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing in ENT or closely allied fields. 1(1-0) F.S. Discus- 
sion of entomological topics selected and assigned by seminar chairman. 

Graduate Staff 

ENT 699 Research. Preq.: Grad. standing. Credits Arranged. F,S. Original research in 
connection with thesis problem in entomology. Graduate Staff 



Fiber and Polymer Science 

ASSOCIATED GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professors: D. M. Cates, D. W. Chaney, J. A. Cuculo, A. H. M. El-Shiekh, T. W. 
George, R. D. Gilbert, D. S. Hamby, S. P. Hersh, H. B. Hopfenberg, P. R. Lord, 
R. McGregor, M. H. M. Mohamed, V. T. Stannett, W. K. Walsh, W. M. Whaley, C. 
F. Zorowski; Professors Emeriti: J. F. Bogdan, G. Goldfinger, H. A. Rutherford, 
R. W. Work; Adjunct Professors: H. F. Mark, A. M. Sookne; Associate 
Professors: R. E. Fornes, P. L. Grady, T. H. Guion, B. S. Gupta, J. J. F. Knapton, 
M. H. Theil, P. A. Tucker; Associate Professor Emeritus: T. G. Rochow 

Fiber and polymer science is a multidisciplinary program bringing together the 
disciplines of mathematics, chemistry and physics and the application of engineer- 
ing principles for the development of independent scholars versed in the field of 
fiber materials science. The program is administered by the School of Textiles and 
leads to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Students majoring in the physical 
sciences, mathematics, textiles or engineering and having at least a "B" grade in 
their undergraduate major will normally qualify for admission. 



142 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Fiber and polymer science is concerned with polymeric materials, fibers 
produced from them, and fiber assemblies in one-, two- and three-dimensional 
forms. This broad field of study permits a wide range of useful concentrations. The 
candidate is expected to penetrate deeply into one area of specialization and to ac- 
quire a reasonable perspective in other relevant subject matter. Generally 
specialization occurs within the area of (1) polymer chemistry and synthesis, (2) 
fiber and polymer physics and physical chemistry, or (3) structural mechanics of 
textile materials. The student's research is based within one of these areas. 

Ample laboratory space is available and there are a number of specialized 
laboratories equipped to support doctoral investigations. Other facilities and 
research equipment which may be used in fiber and polymer science research 
programs are available in cooperating departments on campus. The Burlington 
Textiles Library houses one of the most complete collections of polymer, fiber and 
textile literature. 

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Doctor of Philosophy— An advisory committee chaired by a member of the fiber 
and polymer science faculty is formed as soon as possible to develop with the stu- 
dent a plan of study designed to enable one to acquire the comprehensive 
knowledge required to pass the qualifying cumulative examinations. 

There are no definite requirements in credit hours for the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree. A student's program of study is designed around the student's special in- 
terests, while maintaining the coherence and breadth essential for professional 
development and excellence in research. 

Doctor of Philosophy Minor— Ph.D. candidates who designate a named minor in 
fiber and polymer science will be required to pass the common part of the 
cumulative examination. 

Communications concerning this program should be directed to the Chairman of 
the Committee for the Fiber and Polymer Science Program, School of Textiles, 
North Carolina State University. 

COURSE OFFERINGS* 

(See departmental listing for descriptions.) 
GENERAL COURSES 
TC (CH) 461 Chemistry of Fibers. 
TC 504 Fiber Formation— Theory and Practice. 

TC (CH) 562 Physical Chemistry of High Polymers— Bulk Properties. 
TX 561 Mechanical and Rheological Properties of Fibrous Material. 
TC 591 Special Topics in Textile Science. 



Extensive use may be made of graduate course off erings in other schools on campus when developing the minor field. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 143 

COURSES IN AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION 
Polymer Chemistry and Synthesis 

TC 561 Organic Chemistry of High Polymers. 

TC (CHE) 671 Special Topics in Polymer Science. 
Polymer Physics and Physical Chemistry 

TC 505 Theory of Dyeing. 

TC 662 Physical Chemistry of High Polymers— Solution Properties. 

T 500 Advanced Microscopy. 

T 501 Resinography. 

TX 560 Structural and Physical Properties of Fibers. 

TX (TC) 691 Special Topics in Fiber Science. 

TC (CHE) 569 Polymers, Surfactants, and Colloidal Materials. 

TC (CHE) 570 Radiation Chemistry and Technology of Polymeric Systems. 

TC (CHE) 669 Diffusion in Polymers. 
Structural Mechanics of Textile Materials 

TX 520 Yarn Processing Dynamics. 

TX 549 Warp Knit Engineering and Structural Design. 

TX 550 Fabric Analytics. 

TX 555 Production Mechanics and Properties of Woven Fabrics. 

TX 601 Staple Fiber Structures I. 

TX 602 Staple Fiber Structures II. 

TX 640 Physical and Mechanical Properties of Knitted Fabrics. 

TX 663 Mechanics of Twisted Structures. 

TX 664 Mechanics of Fabric Structures. 



144 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Food Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor W. M. Roberts, Head 

Professors: L. W. Aurand, T. N. Blumer, H. B. Craig, D. D. Hamann, M. W. 
Hoover, V. A. Jones, M. L. Speck— Graduate Administrator, H. E. Swaisgood, F. 
G. Warren; Professor Emeritus: I. D. Jones; Extension Professors: E. S. Cofer, F. 
R. Tarver Jr., F. B. Thomas; Professors USDA: H. P. Fleming, A. E. Purcell, W. 
M. Walter Jr.; USDA Professors Emeriti: T. A. Bell, J. L. Etchells; Associate 
Professors: D. M. Adams Jr., H. R. Ball Jr., D. E. Carroll Jr., A. P. Hansen, C. T. 
Young; Adjunct Associate Professor: W. Y. Cobb; Assistant Professor: T. C. 
Lanier; Adjunct Assistant Professor: B. Ray 

Programs of study leading to the Master of Agriculture, Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered by the Department of Food Science. 

Areas of study and research include food chemistry, food microbiology, food 
engineering, and food process and product development. These areas involve all 
foods including dairy products, fruits, meats, poultry products, seafood, nutmeats 
and vegetables. Supporting course work and cooperative research are offered in 
areas such as biochemistry, chemistry, economics, engineering, genetics, 
microbiology, nutrition, physics, and statistics. 

The department participates in interdepartmental graduate student training 
programs. One is the training program in industrial waste control and abatement 
with the Department of Civil Engineering. Specialization in industrial water use, 
water supply and pollution control is stressed in the water resources graduate 
program. Particular emphasis is given to the processes used in food plant opera- 
tions. The marine sciences program provides research training in the technology of 
seafood processing and product development. The School of Public Health, Univer- 
sity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, offers courses for a minor or for enriching 
food science programs with studies in environmental sciences. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

FS 400 Foods and Nutrition. Preq.: CH 220. 3(3-0) S. 

FS 402 Food Chemistry. Preq.: CH 220 or CH 221. 3(3-0) F. 

FS (PO) 404 Poultry Products. Preq.: CH 220 or CH 221. 3(2-3) F. 

FS (MB) 405 Food Microbiology. Preq.: MB 401. 3(2-3) F. 

FS (ANS) 409 Meat and Meat Products. Preq.: CH 220. 3(2-3) S. 

FS (BAE) 432 Food Engineering II. Preq.: FS 331. 3(2-3) S. 

FS 490 Food Science Seminar. Preq.: Sr. standing. 1(1-0) F. 

FS 491 Special Topics in Food Science. Preq.: Sr. standing or CI. Maximum 6 F,S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 145 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

FS 503 Food Analysis. Preqs.: CH 315, BCH 351, FS 402. 3(1-6) S. A study of the princi- 
ples, methods and techniques necessary for quantitative physical and chemical analyses of 
food and food products. Results of analyses evaluated in terms of quality standards and 
governing regulations. Young 

FS 504 Food Proteins and Enzymes. Preq.: FS 402 or BCH 351. 3(2-3) Alt. F. An advanced 
course in food chemistry with emphasis on proteins and enzymes of particular importance to 
foods will be presented. Protein interactions and their effect on the physical-chemical 
characteristics of a product will be discussed. Particular emphasis will be given to the 
preparation and kinetic properties of immobilized enzymes and their use as biochemical 
reactors in processing operations or as specific electrodes for analytical purposes. 

Swaisgood 

FS (MB) 506 Advanced Food Microbiology. Preq.: FS (MB) 405 or equivalent. 3(1-6) S. 
The interactions of microorganisms in foods and their roles in food spoilage and bioprocess- 
ing. Cellular and molecular relationships in bacterial injury, repair and aging resulting from 
environmental stresses. Bacterial sporulation, germination, and physiological properties of 
bacterial spores. Adams 

FS 511 Food Research and Development. Preqs.: FS 331, FS 402, FS (MB) 405. 3(2-3) S. A 
study of the scientific principles underlying the development of new and improved food 
products and processes. The study of specific food industry problems by the case method. 
Special emphasis on the application of research and development principles to meat, poultry, 
and fisheries industries. Graduate Staff 

FS 516 Quality Control of Food Products. Preqs.: FS 331, FS 402, FS (MB) 405. 3(2-3) S. 
A study of quality control fundamentals in the food industry including specifications and 
standards, testing procedures, sampling, statistical and quality control, and organization. 
Food products and industry problems with special emphasis on dairy products. Adams 

FS (HS) 521 Food Preservation. Preqs.: MB 401 or FS (MB) 405, FS 402, or BO 421. 3(2-3) 
F. An examination of principles and methods employed in the preservation of foods. Major 
emphasis on thermal, freezing, drying and fermentation processes and their relationship to 
physical, chemical and organoleptic changes in product. The relationship of these preserva- 
tion techniques to the development of an overall processing operations. Carroll 

FS (HS) 562 Post-Harvest Physiology. 3(3-0) S. (See horticultural science, page 159. ) 

FS (BAE) 585 Biorheology. Preqs.: PY 205, ESM 307. 3(2-2) Alt. S. The concepts of strain, 
stress and the mechanical viscoelastic properties of biological solids, fluids and slurries. The 
time-dependent deformation and flow of bio-materials elements of strength of materials, 
rheological equations and model concepts, creep-relaxation and dynamic behavior, contact 
problems and the Boltzman superposition principle as a function of time, temperature and 
moisture content. Hamann 

FS 591 Special Problems in Food Science. Preq.: Grad. or sr. standing. Maximum 6 F,S. 
Analysis of scientific, engineering and economic problems of current interest in foods. The 
problems are designed to provide training and experience in research. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

FS 601 Physical Measurements of Biopolymers. Preqs.: CH 231 or CH 431, FS 504 or 
BCH 551. 3(2-3) S. The theory of methods commonly used to physically characterize 
biopolymers will be discussed. Interpretation and limitations of measured values of various 



146 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

physical parameters will be stressed. Particular emphasis will be given to the experimental 
design and interpretation of the data obtained which will yield the maximum amount of in- 
formation. Swaisgood 

FS 690 Seminar in Food Science. 1(1-0) F,S. Preparation and presentation of scientific 
papers, progress reports and research and special topics of interest in foods. 

Speck, Swaisgood 

FS 691 Special Research Problems in Food Science. Credits Arranged. F,S. Directed 
research in a specialized phase of food science designed to provide experience in research 
methodology and philosophy. Graduate Staff 

FS 699 Research in Food Science. Credits Arranged. F,S. Original research preparatory 
to the thesis for the Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degree. Graduate Staff 



Foreign Languages and Literatures 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor A. A. Gonzalez, Head 

Professor: E. M. Stack; Professor Emeritus: G. W. Poland; Associate Professors: G. 
Gonzalez, J. R. Kelly, M. Paschal, E. W. Rollins, J. Stewart, H. Tucker Jr. 

The Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures offers courses to assist 
graduate students in preparing themselves to use modern foreign languages in 
research and advanced study. These courses are not open to undergraduate stu- 
dents. Students are encouraged particularly to seek useful foreign research related 
to their thesis or other research in progress. 

Certification may be obtained in languages not normally taught by the depart- 
ment with special permission of the Graduate School. 

*FLF 401 French for Graduate Students. 3(3-0) F. Development of basic vocabulary, 
knowledge of structures and translation techniques necessary to a reading skill. This course 
is provided to assist graduate students to prepare for the foreign language reading certifica- 
tion. It does not provide instruction in original composition or in speaking. Students will be 
certified in the language after successfully passing the final examination. (No prerequisite.) 

*FLG 401 German for Graduate Students. 3(3-0) F. This course seeks to teach the struc- 
tures and patterns of the language as used in technical and scholarly writing, with emphasis 
on the acquisition of a basic vocabulary. Examples will be drawn from a variety of sources to 
reflect the interest of all students. Completion of the course, including the final examination, 
will certify the student in the language. (No prerequisite.) 

*FLS 401 Spanish for Graduate Students. 3(3-0) F. A course designed to teach students 
to read Spanish as used in scholarly and technical writing. Material will be drawn from 
various sources reflecting student interest. Students completing the course, including the 
final examination, will be certified in the language. (No prerequisite.) 



* These courses are designed to be audited and credits do not apply toward advanced degrees. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 147 

Forestry 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor C. B. Davey, Head 

Professors: F. S. Barkalow Jr., A. W. Cooper, E. B. Cowling, M. H. Farrier, L. F. 
Grand, W. L. Hafley, J. W. Johnson, J. 0. Lammi, T. 0. Perry, L. C. Saylor, R. R. 
Wilkinson, A. G. Wollum II, B. J. Zobel; Professor USDA: D. E. Moreland; 
Professors Emeriti: T. E. Maki, W. D. Miller, R. J. Preston; Adjunct Professors: 
G. H. Hepting, E. G. Kuhlman, L. J. Metz, G. Namkoong, C. G. Wells; Associate 
Professors: J. D. Hair, A. E. Hassan, D. L. Holley Jr., R. C. Kellison, D. H. J. 
Steensen, A. L. Sullivan; Adjunct Associate Professor: H. A. Thomas; Assistant 
Professors: D. J. Frederick, F. P. Hain; Adjunct Associate Professors: H. T. 
Schreuder, R. W. Stonecypher; Adjunct Assistant Professors: J . A. Barker, R. L. 
Blair; Liaiso)i Geneticist: R. J. Weir 

The Department of Forestry offers graduate work leading to the degrees of 
Master of Forestry, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy. 

The professional degree, Master of Forestry, is designed for students interested 
in the advanced applications of the principles of one of the fields in forestry. The 
course program emphasizes professional specialization; a thesis is not required. 

The Master of Science degree requires the student to become broadly educated in 
the scholarly disciplines in the field of forestry. Independent research and a thesis 
are required for this degree. 

Students with a bachelor's degree in forestry may complete either of the master's 
programs in two academic years or less, provided they have met the undergraduate 
curriculum requirements in mathematics and the biological, physical, and social 
sciences. Candidates who do not hold an undergraduate degree in forestry usually 
are required to extend their programs. 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is available to students who demonstrate high 
intellectual capacity and the ability to conduct original research and scholarly 
work at the highest levels. 

Joint and associate faculty appointments with other departments provide excep- 
tional opportunities for graduate studies in the forestry-related aspects of 
biometry, botany, ecology, economics and business, engineering, entomology, 
genetics, horticulture, hydrology, landscape architecture, plant pathology, soil 
science, and wildlife science. Students who are concerned with the problems of 
restoring and improving the quality of our environment may find meaningful 
graduate study in forestry. 

The department is housed in the modern facilities of Biltmor© Hall, facilities for 
forest biological research include a phytotron, greenhouses, and a small experimen- 
tal nursery. The experimental and productiun forests of the school total more than 
80,000 acres. The Hofmann Forest on the coastal plain, the Goodwin Forest at the 
edge of the sandhills, and the Schenck, Hope Valley, and Hill forests in the Pied- 
mont provide a variety of forest types and problems in the management of timber, 
water, wildlife, and recreational resources. The Hill and Schenck forests include 



148 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

natural areas, excluded from normal management operations, for the study of 
forest ecology. 

The department has close working relations, including four cooperative 
programs of research and development (Tree Improvement and Hardwood 
Research Cooperative, North Carolina State Forest Fertilization Cooperative, and 
the Forest Engineering Equipment Development Cooperative), with public agen- 
cies and the forest industries of the southeastern United States. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

FOR 405 Forest Land Management. Preqs.: FOR 272, 452. 5(2-6-2) F. 

FOR 406 Forest Land Inventory and Planning. Preq.: FOR 405. 6(2-12) S. 

FOR 411 Forest Tree Improvement. Preq.: Jr. or Sr. standing in FOR. 3(3-0) F. 

FOR (WPS) 423 Logging and Milling. Preq.: Jr. standing. 3(2-3) F. 

FOR (WPS) 435 Systems Analysis in Forest Products. Preq.: Sr. standing. 3(3-0) S. 

FOR 452 Silvics. Preqs.: BO 200, CH 103, PY 221 or PY 212, mathematics through 
calculus. 4(3-2) S. 

FOR 462 Artificial Forestation. 2(1-2) S. 

FOR 472 Renewable Resource Management. Preqs.: A basic course in biology and 
economics; Jr. or Sr. standing. 3(3-0) S. 

FOR 491 Senior Problems in Forestry. Preq.: Consent of department. Credits Arranged. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

FOR 501 Forest Influences and Watershed Management. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. 
or grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. Study of the effects of woody vegetation on climate, water, and 
soil, with applications of the knowledge of forest influences to management of forest land 
resources including conservation and yield of water, stabilization of streamflow and soils, 
reduction of sedimentation and general improvement of the environment. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR 512 Forest Economics. Preq.: Basic course in economics. 3(3-0) S. Economics and 
social value of forests; supply of, and demands for forest products; land use; forestry as a 
private and a public enterprise; economics of the forest industries. Holley 

FOR 571 Advanced Forest Mensuration. Preqs.: FOR 272, ST 311. 3(2-2) F. Study of the 
development of mathematical models to describe forest resources phenomena; criteria for 
evaluating the "goodness" of such models; and methods of data collection for use in evalua- 
tion. Haf l ey 

FOR 572 Conservation Policy Issues. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. or grad. standing. 3(3- 
0) S. Analysis of the attitudes of selected private groups and public agencies toward multiple 
resource development. Special attention given to fore 3 t resource policies, timber manage- 
ment objectives, private industry activity, recreation and multiple ubp, education, research, 
watersheds, governmental activity, interaction in international forestry affairs and the role 
of professional foresters in multiple-use resource management. Lammi 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 149 

FOR 591 Forestry Problems. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. or grad. standing. Credits 
Arranged. Assigned or selected problems in the field of silviculture, harvesting operations, 
lumber manufacturing, policy, wood science, pulp and paper science, wood chemistry or 
forest management. Graduate Staff 

FOR 599 Methods of Research in Forestry. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. or grad. 
standing. Credits Arranged. Research procedures, problem analysis, working plan prepara- 
tion, interpretation and presentation of results; evaluation of selected studies by forest 
research organizations; techniques and constraints in the use of sample plots. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

FOR (GN) 611 Forest Genetics. Preq.: GN 411 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Application of genetic prin- 
ciples to silviculture, management and wood utilization. Emphasis is on variation in wild 
populations, the bases for selection of desirable qualities, and fundamentals of controlled 
breeding. Saylor, Zobel 

FOR (GN) 612 Advanced Topics in Quantitative Genetics. Preqs.: GN (FOR) 611, GN 
(ST) 626 or GN (ANS) 603 or CI. 3(3-0) F. Advanced topics in statistics and population 
genetics pertinent to current research problems in genetics with special applications to 
forestry. Basic statistical and genetic theory is reviewed as bases for intensive study of selec- 
tion theory and experimental and mating design evaluation. The genetics of natural popula- 
tions are studied for evolutionary interest as well as for their implications to breeding 
theory. Namkoong 

FOR 613 Special Topics in Silviculture. Preq.: One course in silviculture or CI. 3(2-1) F. 
Critical examination of selected topics, with special emphasis on concepts and phenomena 
which distinguish forests from other biotic communities and silviculture from other fields of 
applied biology. Johnson 

FOR 614 Advanced Topics in Forest Land Management. Preq.: FOR 405 or equivalent. 
3(3-0) F. A collation of the disciplines in silvics, forest growth estimation, growing stock 
regulation, forest soil management and site quality evaluation, forest influences, and 
silviculture, with emphasis on the interrelationships of these disciplines in the management 
of forest land resources and the applications to forest management systems. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR 691 Graduate Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) F,S. Presentation and discus- 
sion of progress reports on research, special problems and outstanding publications in 
forestry and related fields. Graduate Staff 

FOR 692 Advanced Forest Management Problems. Preq.: Grad. standing. Credits 
Arranged. Directed studies in forest management. Graduate Staff 

FOR 699 Problems and Research. Preq.: Grad. standing. Credits Arranged. Specific 
forestry problems that will furnish material for a thesis. Graduate Staff 



150 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Genetics 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. G. Scandalios, Head 

Professors: D. S. Grosch, W. D. Hanson, W. E. Kloos, C. S. Levings III, T. J. Mann, 
D. F. Matzinger, R. H. Moll, H. E. Scha'ffer, B. W. Smith, A. C. Triantaphyllou; 
Professors (USDA): L. G. Burk, C. W. Stuber; Professors Emeriti: C. H. Bostian, 
L. E. Mettler, S. G. Stephens; Adjunct Professors: H. V. Mailing, Gene 
Namkoong; Associate Professor: W. H. McKenzie; Assistant Professors: G. C. 
Bevvley, S. M. Flashman, C. C. Laurie-Ahlberg, J. C. Sorenson 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 

Professors: J. L. Apple, F. B. Armstrong, F. D. Cochran, C. C. Cockerham, E. J. 
Eisen, D. A. Emery, D. U. Gerstel, E. W. Glazener, M. M. Goodman, W. C. 
Gregory, F. L. Haynes Jr., T. T. Hebert, J. E. Legates, B. T. McDaniel, T. 0. 
Perry, L. L. Phillips, N. T. Powell, J. 0. Rawlings, 0. W. Robison, L. C. Saylor, D. 
H. Timothy, E. A. Wernsman, B. J. Zobel; Professor Emeritus: J. W. Duffield; 
USDA Professors: C. A. Brim, J. F. Chaplin, W. A. Cope, J. A. Lee, D. L. 
Thompson; Associate Professors: E. U. Dillard, C. F. Murphy; USDA Associate 
Professor: G. R. Gwynn 

Graduate study under the direction of the genetics faculty may enable the stu- 
dent to qualify for the Master of Science or the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. A 
candidate for the master's degree must acquire a thorough understanding of 
genetics and its relation to other biological disciplines and must present a thesis 
based upon one's own research. In addition to a comprehensive knowledge of his or 
her field, a candidate for the doctorate must demonstrate a capacity for indepen- 
dent investigation and scholarship in genetics. 

At North Carolina State University there are no sharp divisions along 
departmental lines or between theoretical and applied aspects of genetics research. 
The members and associate members of the genetics faculty are located in seven 
different departments of the Schools of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Forest 
Resources and Physical and Mathematical Sciences. They are studying a wide 
range of genetic problems and are utilizing not only the "classic" laboratory 
material (maize, bacteria, Drosophilia,, Rumex, Habrobracon, mice), but also farm 
animals and agricultural and forest plants of the region. A student has, therefore, a 
wide choice of research problems in any of the following fields: cytology and 
cytogenetics, microbial and biochemical genetics, physiological and developmental 
genetics, evolution and speciation, quantitative and population genetics and the ap- 
plication of genetics to breeding methodology. 

Departmental offices and laboratories are located in Gardner Hall with 
greenhouse facilities adjacent to the building. A genetics garden for use in inten- 
sive research with plants and teaching functions is located three miles from the of- 
fices. The departmental staff and the associate faculty members in animal science, 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 151 

biochemistry, crop science, horticultural science, poultry science, plant pathology, 
experimental statistics, and the School of Forest Resources are fortunate in being 
able to draw upon the extensive facilities of the North Carolina Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

GN 41 1 The Principles of Genetics. Preq.: BS 100 (Jr. standing). 3(3-0) F,S. 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Laboratory. Preq. or coreq.: GN 411. 1(0-2) F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

GN 504 Human Genetics. Preq.: GN 301 or 411, or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. The basic princi- 
ples needed for an understanding of the genetics of man. Current knowledge and important 
areas of research in human genetics. McKenzie, Schaffer 

GN 505A,B,C,D Genetics I. Preq.: GN 411 or its equivalent. 1-4 F. Lectures in genetic 
principles presented as a series of five-week minicourses: GN 505A, qualitative genetics; GN 
505B, microbial and biochemical genetics; GN 505C, cytogenetics. The laboratory, GN 505D, 
will involve experimental techniques in genetics and will extend throughout the semester. 
Majors and minors must enroll for the entire series. Others may enroll for specific 
minicourses and attend first lecture of semester for schedule. Grosch, Gerstel, Kloos 

GN 506A,B,C,D Genetics II. Preq.: GN 411 or its equivalent. 1-4 S. Lectures in genetic 
principles presented as a series of five-week minicourses: GN 506A, developmental genetics; 
GN 506B, quantitative genetics; GN 506C, population genetics. The laboratory, GN 506D, will 
involve experimental techniques in genetics and will extend throughout the semester. Majors 
and minors must enroll for the entire series. Others may enroll for specific minicourses and 
attend first lecture of semester for schedule. Scandalios, Moll, Ahlberg 

GN (ANS) 508 Genetics of Animal Improvement. 3(3-0) S. (See animal science, page 56.) 

GN (PO) 520 Poultry Breeding. 3(2-2) S. (See poultry science, page 226.) 

GN (ZO) 532 Biological Effects of Radiations. Preq.: BS 100, or GN 301, or CI. 3(3-0) S. 
Qualitative and quantitative effects of radiations (other than the visible spectrum) on 
biological systems, to include both morphological and physiological aspects in a considera- 
tion of genetics, cytology, histology, and morphogenesis. Grosch 

GN (ZO) 540 Evolution. Preq.: Nine credits in biological sciences. 3(3-0) F. The facts and 
theories of evolution in plants and animals. The causes and consequences of organic diver- 
sity. Smith 

GN (CS, HS) 541 Plant Breeding Methods. 3(3-0) F. (See crop science, page 93.) 

GN (CS, HS) 542 Plant Breeding Field Procedures. 2(0-4) Sum. (See crop science, page 

93.) 

GN (CS) 545 Origin and Evolution of Cultivated Plants. 2(2-0) S. (See crop science, page 
93.) 

GN (ZO) 550 Experimental Evolution. Preq.: GN 506, or CI. 3(3-0) F. A survey of studies 

on experimental and natural populations of plants, animals, and man in relation to the 
theoretical aspects of evolution and speciation; a descriptive rather than rigorous 
mathematical review. (Offered 1978-79 and alt. years.) Laurie-Ahlberg 



152 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

GN 560 Molecular Genetics. Preqs.: GN 411; BCH 351. 3(3-0) F. A discussion of the struc- 
ture and function of the genetic material at a molecular level. Both prokaryotic and 
eukaryotic systems will be considered. The aim will be to describe genetics in terms of 
chemical principles. (Offered 1978-79 and alt. years.) Flashman 

GN (BCH, MB) 561 Biochemical and Microbial Genetics. Preqs.: BCH 351 or 551, GN 
411 or 505, MB 401 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. The course will include the development of the 
fields of biochemical and microbial genetics and will emphasize both the techniques and con- 
cepts utilized in current research. Armstrong 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

GN (ANS) 603 Population Genetics in Animal Improvement. 3(3-0) F. (See animal 
science, page 56.) 

GN (FOR) 611 Forest Genetics. 3(3-0) S. (See forestry, page 147.) 

GN (FOR) 612 Advanced Topics in Quantitative Genetics. 3(3-0) F. (See forestry, page 
147.) 

GN (CS, HS) 613 Plant Breeding Theory. 3(3-0) S. (See crop science, page 93.) 

GN (ST) 626 Statistical Concepts in Genetics. 3(3-0) S. (See statistics, page 247.) 

GN 631 Mathematical Genetics. Preqs.: GN 506, ST 511, or CI. 3(3-0) F. Mathematical 
models of genetic systems, including probabilistic and deterministic formulations. Theory of 
survival of mutations, genetic linkage and dynamics of populations. (Offered in 1978-79 and 
alt. years.) Schaffer 

GN 633 Physiological Genetics. Preq.: GN 505 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Recent advances in 
physiological genetics. Attention will be directed to literature on the nature and action of 
genes, and to the interaction of heredity and environment in the expression of characteristics 
of higher organisms. Grosch 

GN 641 Colloquium in Genetics. Preqs.: Grad. standing; CI. 2(2-0) F,S. Informal group 
discussion of prepared topics assigned by the instructor. Graduate Staff 

GN 650 Developmental Genetics. Preqs.: GN 411 or GN 505C and GN 506A. 3(3-0) S. The 
action and regulation of genes and gene-products in development and differentiation. Exam- 
ples will be taken from microorganisms, plants and animals (including man). Emphasis will 
be placed on molecular and biochemical aspects of mechanisms controlling gene expression 
in eukaryote cell differentation. (Offered in 1979-80 and alt. years.) Scandalios 

GN 651 Somatic Cell Genetics. Preqs.: GN 505B and GN 506A; BCH 351. 3(3-0) F. Discus- 
sion of the use of non-germ line cells for the genetic analysis of eukaryotic organisms. Plant, 
animal, and fungal systems will be considered. Topics include: mutagenesis, selection, cells 
fusion, parasexual cycles, cloning, and regeneration of whole organisms. (Offered in 1979-80 
and alt. years.) Flashman 

GN 691 Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) F,S. Graduate Staff 

GN 694 Selected Topics in Cytogenetics. Preqs.: GN 506 or CI. 2(2-0) F. Readings and dis- 
cussions of original cytogenetic literature. Chromosome replication, DNA redundancy, 
heterochromatin, models of crossing over and somatic cell genetics are some of the areas in- 
cluded. Topics of special interest to class members will also be covered. Gerstel 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 153 

GN 695 Special Problems in Genetics. Preqs.: Advanced grad. standing, CI. 1 to 3 F,S. 
Special topics designed for additional experience and research training. Graduate Staff 

GN 699 Research. Preqs.: Grad. standing, permission of adviser. Credit Arranged. 
Original research related to the student's thesis problem. A maximum of six credits for the 
master's degree; by arrangement for the doctorate. Graduate Staff 



Geosciences 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor C. J. Leith, Head 

Professors: H. S. Brown, E. G. Droessler, W. J. Saucier, C. W. Welby; Professor 
Emeritus: J. M. Parker III; Associate Professors: S. P. S. Arya, V. V. Cavaroc Jr., 
C. D. Harrington, G. S. Janowitz, C. E. Knowles, L. J. Pietrafesa, G. F. Watson, 
A. H. Weber; Adjunct Associate Professors: F. S. Binkowski, R. M. Flores, N. E. 
Huang; Assistant Professors: M. J. Aldrich, D. T. Long, E. F. Stoddard, T. L. 
Tsui, R. H. Weisberg, I. J. Won; Adjunct Assistant Professors: W. D. Bach Jr., J. 
K. Ching, R. E. Eskridge; Research Associate: D. A. Brooks 

The Department of Geosciences offers graduate programs leading to the Master 
of Science degree in geology and in meteorology and, as its input into the inter- 
departmental graduate program in marine sciences, also offers graduate courses in 
physical oceanography. Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are 
granted through the University Marine Sciences Program (page 171) with speciali- 
zations in geological, meteorological, and physical oceanography. 

Candidates for admission to the graduate program in geology should hold a 
bachelor's degree in geology or a satisfactory equivalent, preferably with a strong 
background in physics, chemistry and mathematics. For graduate study in 
meteorology the required background includes chemistry, physics, mathematics, 
and basic knowledge of atmospheric physics and mechanics. For a graduate 
program in physical oceanography a bachelor's degree in one of the physical 
sciences or engineering with a strong background in physics and mathematics is re- 
quired. In each of the three disciplines the master's degree program includes a 
minimum of 30 semester hours credit divided between major and minor fields, and 
a research thesis. The general requirements for a Ph.D. program in marine sciences 
are described on page 171. 

Facilities are available for research in mineralogy, petrology, hydrogeology, 
economic geology, engineering geology, meteorology, physical oceanography and 
geophysical fluid dynamics. Collections of geoscience literature are available in the 
University library and elsewhere in the Research Triangle area. Consultations with 
scientists of the federal and state agencies in Raleigh as well as with the staffs of 
the neighboring universities are encouraged. 

Financial aid is available through laboratory teaching assistantships and 
assistantships on faculty research projects. Government agencies and industrial 



154 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

concerns occasionally provide part-time employment. Small grants from the state 
sometimes are available to help with thesis expenses. 

Geology courses follow. For other departmental offerings, see meteorology and 
physical oceanography. 



Geology 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

GY 400 Environmental Geology. Preq.: GY 101 or 120. 3(2-1) S. 

GY 415 Mineral Exploration and Evaluation. Preqs.: GY 440, 452. 3(2-3) S. 

GY 440 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology. Preq.: GY 331. 4(3-3) F. 

GY 452 Sedimentary Petrology and Stratigraphy. Coreq.: GY 331. 4(3-3) S. 

GY 461 Engineering Geology. Preq.: GY 101 or 120. 3(3-0) F. 

GY 465 Geologic Field Camp. Preqs.: GY 351, 440, 452. 6 Sum. 

GY 470 Principles of Geophysics. Preqs.: PY 208 or 212; GY 120 or equivalent recom- 
mended. 3(3-0) F. 

GY 491 Seminar on Selected Geologic Topics. 1-3 F. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

GY 500 Regional Geology of North America. Preqs.: GY 101 or 120, sr. standing. 1-6. 
Field study of classic geologic localities and geomorphic processes not indigenous to North 
Carolina. Typical areas are New England and adjacent Canada, northern Mexico and 
southwestern United States, and the Pacific Northwest. Representative subjects include the 
Canadian Shield, Precambrian mineral deposits, the San Andreas fault, desert 
geomorphology, Grand Canyon stratigraphy, modern and ancient reefs, and glaciated 
volcanoes. Mineral, rock, and fossil collecting. Student reports required. 

Graduate Staff 

GY 521 Introduction to Subsurface Well Evaluation. Preqs.: CH 103, PY 212, GY 120. 
3(2-3) Alt. F. Principles, uses and interpretation of commonly used wireline technique for 
structural, lithologic, and fluid evaluation of wells. Oriented towards petroleum re- 
serve/evaluations. Cavaroc 

GY 522 Petroleum Geology. Preq.: GY 452. 3(3-0) S. Properties, origin, and modes of oc- 
currence of petroleum and natural gas. Geologic and economic features of the principal oil 
and gas fields, mainly in the United States. (Offered S 1980 and alt. years.) Leith 

GY 524 Continental Evolution. Preqs.: GY 222, 351, 440, 452. 3(3-0) F. The stratigraphic 
and tectonic events which have shaped the continents, with emphasis upon North America; 
field trips. (Offered F 1978 and alt. years.) Welby 

GY 532 Ore Microscopy. Preq.: GY 331. 3(0-6) F. The theory and technique of microscopic 
investigation of opaque ore minerals, ores and mill products produced by beneficiation of 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 155 

ores. Studies of compositions and textures of materials in polished surfaces are based on ob- 
servations of optical and physical properties, etch reactions and microchemical tests. (Of- 
fered F 1979 and alt. years.) Brown 

GY 542 Microscopic Petrography. Preq.: GY 440. 3(1-4) F. Systematic study by 
microscopic techniques of the constitution and origin of consolidated rocks. 

Aldrich, Cavaroc 

GY 545 Advanced Igneous Petrology. Preq.: GY 440. 3(2-2) S. Physicochemical principles 
related to igneous petrogenesis. General principles and specific problems including the 
origin, differentiation and emplacement of magmas and the possible relationships of igneous 
processes to global tectonics. (Offered S 1980 and alt. years.) Graduate Staff 

GY 546 Advanced Metamorphic Petrology. Preq.: GY 440. 3(2-2) S. The petrogenesis of 
metamorphic rocks including factors of metamorphism, metamorphic facies concept, 
metamorphic facies series, contact metamorphism, regional dynamothermal 
metamorphism, burial metamorphism, ACF-AKF diagrams and feldspars of metamorphic 
rocks. (Offered S 1979 and alt. years.) Stoddard 

GY 563 Applied Sedimentary Analysis. Preqs.: GY 452, ST 361. 3(2-2) F. Extension of GY 
452, with emphasis on coarser grained detrital and chemical sedimentary rocks. Sampling of 
sedimentary population, critical study of assumptions underlying standard measurement 
techniques; treatment, testing and evaluation of sedimentary data; application to problems 
in sedimentology. (Offered F 1978 and alt. years.) Cavaroc 

GY 564 Depositional Environments and Lithostratigraphy. Preq.: GY 452 or grad. 
standing. 3(2-3) S. Fabric of large sedimentary basins in terms of the spatial distribution of 
component major rock facies; current litho-genetic models illustrating internal lithic 
relationships, variability, and predictability; evolution of litho-genetic units; comparison 
with recent equivalents; field trips. Cavaroc 

GY 565 Hydrogeology. Preq.: GY 452. 3(3-0) S. Occurrence and sources of surface and sub- 
surface water. Relationships of surface water to subsurface water. Rock properties affecting 
infiltration, movement, lateral and vertical distribution, and quality of ground water. Deter- 
mination of permeability, capacity, specific yield, and other hydraulic characteristics of 
aquifiers. Principles of well design, legal aspects of water supplies. (Offered S 1979 and alt. 
years.) Welby 

GY 567 Geochemistry. Preq.: CH 331 or 433. 3(3-0) F. The quantitative distribution of ele- 
ments in the earth's crust, the hydrosphere and the atmosphere. Application of the laws of 
chemical equilibrium and resultant chemical reactions to natural earth systems. 
Geochemical application of Eh-pH diagrams. Geochemical cycles. Isotope geochemistry. (Of- 
fered F 1978 and alt. years.) Long 

GY 570 Exploration and Engineering Geophysics. Preq.: GY 470 or PY 207 or PY 208 or 

equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Geophysical methods as applied to exploring the earth's mineral and 
energy resources and investigating subsurface geological structure and its physical proper- 
ties. Principles, measurements, analyses, and interpretations of gravity, magnetic, electric, 
electromagnetic, seismic methods. ™on 

GY 571 Geophysical Field Methods. Preq.: GY 570. 2(2-week summer camp) Sum. Two- 
week summer field course. Practical geophysical field measurements using instruments for 
gravity, magnetic, electric, electromagnetic and radioactivity methods. Data interpretation 
in terms of subsurface geological structures and their physical properties, locations, sizes 
and shapes. Students are required to register for the course in the second summer session 
Location: within the state of North Carolina; estimated expense: $150. Won 



156 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

GY 581 Geomorphology. Preqs.: GY 101 or 120 plus appropriate background. 3(2-3) F. 
Land forms and their relations to processes, stages of development, and adjustments of 
structure. Emphasis on mass-wasting, fluvial geomorphology of humid and arid climates, 
coasts, karst and eolian processes. Lectures, map interpretations and field trips. 

Harrington 

GY 582 Quaternary Geology. Preqs.: GY 101 or 120, sr. standing. 3(3-0) S. Glaciology, 
glacial geology, Pleistocene stratigraphy, periglacial geomorphology; Quaternary volcanism, 
tectonism, and sea-level fluctuations; late Cenozoic climate changes; field trips. (Offered S 
1979 and alt. years.) Graduate Staff 

GY 583 Photogeology. Preq.: GY 101 or 120. 3(2-2) S. The stereoscopic study of aerial 
photographs to obtain geologic information. The construction of bedrock and surficial 
geologic maps from aerial photographs. Aspects of remote sensing useful in geologic inter- 
pretation. Harrington 

GY (MAS) 584 Marine Geology. Preqs.: GY 452, or 101 or 120 plus appropriate 
background. 3(3-0) S. Morphology, structure and origin of ocean basins with their diverse 
features and their relations to the continents. Physical and chemical properties of the oceans, 
sedimentation in the marine environment and near-shore features. The economic potential of 
mineral resources derived from oceanic areas. (Offered S 1980 and alt. years.) Welby 

GY 593 Advanced Topics in Geology. Preq.: CI. 1-6 F,S. Special study of some advanced 
phases of geology. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

GY 611, 612 Advanced Economic Geology. Preqs.: GY 440, 452. 3(3-0) F,S. Detailed study 
of the origin and occurrence of specific mineral deposits. Brown 

GY 630 Geotectonics. Preqs.: GY 351, 440, 452. 3(3-0) F. Philosophical and historical 
development of major geologic concepts. Concepts include: orogeny and epeirogeny; oroclines 
and geosynclines; plate tectonics, ocean basin development, and continental drift; magnetic 
cycles in orogeny; expanding and contracting earth theories, and energy sources for earth 
deformation. (Offered F 1978 and alt. years.) Aldrich 

GY 695 Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) F,S. Scientific articles, progress reports 
and special problems of interest to geologists and geological and mining engineers discussed. 

Graduate Staff 

GY 699 Geological Research. Preq.: CI. Credits Arranged. Lectures, reading assignments 
and reports; special work in geology to meet the needs and interests of the students. Thesis 
problem. Graduate Staff 



Guidance and Personnel Services 

For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see guidance and 
personnel services under education, page 105. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 157 

History 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Associate Professor: M. E. Wheeler, Head 

Professors: B. F. Beers, M. L. Brown Jr., M. S. Downs, R. W. Greenlaw, W. C. 
Harris, J. P. Hobbs, D. E. King, J. M. Riddle, S. Suval, B. W. Wishy; Associate 
Professors: J. R. Banker, W. H. Beezley, C. H. Carlton, R. N. Elliott, G. D. 
Newby, R. H. Sack, E. D. Sylla; Adjunct Associate Professor: T. W. Mitchell; 
Assistant Professors: R. M. Collins, C. Constantin, J. E. Crisp, A. J. LaVopa, J. 
A. Mulholland, G. W. O'Brien, J. K. Ocko, D. Scott; Adjunct Assistant Professor: 
William S. Price Jr. 

The history department offers a program leading to the Master of Arts degree in 
history. Although no specific courses are stipulated for admission to the program, 
preference will be given to those students with at least 18 hours in history and a 
total of 30 hours in the social sciences. Candidates are expected to have taken the 
aptitude portion of the Graduate Record Examination, or if admitted provisionally 
must do so before the end of their first semester. Candidates are requested to in- 
clude a brief statement of their objective in entering the program along with their 
application. 

Normally a degree candidate will concentrate work in either European or 
American history with the required total of 30 hours being made up of nine to 
twelve hours of course work at the 500 level or above; six hours of research seminar 
(600 level); up to six hours of research and preparation of thesis (600 level); and six 
to nine hours of course work in a field related to the candidate's area of concentra- 
tion (500 or 600 level). Under special circumstances a candidate may be permitted 
to include a 400-level course (see undergraduate catalog for descriptions) in his or 
her program if it has particular relevance to one's program objectives. 

Master's candidates may incorporate into their programs course work enhancing 
their vocational opportunities. Social studies teachers may be awarded G certifica- 
tion through completion of a degree with a major in history and a minor in educa- 
tion. For those interested in the fields of archives administration, records manage- 
ment, museology, and historical preservation, the department is offering in 
cooperation with the North Carolina Department of Archives and History a num- 
ber of courses which prepare individuals for a professional career in a public 
historical agency. These latter courses are in a developmental stage as this catalog 
goes to press. Those interested should write to the Director of Graduate Studies. 
Department of History for further details. 

Although no fellowships are now offered, some limited financial assistance is 
available. Inquiry should be addressed to the department head, 161 Harrelson Hall. 



158 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

NOTE: Prerequisite: (500 level) Six hours of advanced history or equivalent. 

HI 515 The High Middle Ages. 3(3-0). An analysis of various aspects of medieval culture. 
Selected topics such as the revival of the Roman Empire, monastic and papal reform, the rise 
of universities, the evolution of representatives bodies, the Gothic style, troubadour and 
goliardic poetry, scholasticism, and the revival of Roman law will be examined using source 
readings. Research techniques will also be discussed. Riddle 

HI 528 England in the Age of the American Revolution. 3(3-0) Alt. Yr. An intensive 
study of English political, religious, economic, social, and imperial ideas and institutions be- 
tween 1763 and 1783 with special emphasis on how these affected and were affected by the 
War of the American Revolution. Downs 

HI 530 Era of the French Revolution and Napoleon. 3(3-0). An examination of aspects of 
the French Revolution and the Napoleonic era which are currently subject to differing inter- 
pretations. Greenlaw 

HI 532 History of Great Britain, 1820-1914. 3(3-0). A history of Great Britain from the 
Regency of George IV to the outbreak of World War I with special emphasis on studies in 
depth of the most significant developments in constitutional, religious, and economic ideas 
and institutions. Downs 

HI 536 History of International Relations Since 1870. 3(3-0). A study of European 
diplomatic history and of the larger area of world international relations from the Franco- 
Prussian war through both World Wars up to the present. Emphasis on policies and at- 
tempts to solve international problems. Brown 

HI 545 The American Civil War. 3(3-0) F. The course traces and analyzes events that led 
to the disruption of the union and provides an intensive study of the war, with emphasis 
upon its nonmilitary aspects. Only the major military campaigns are discussed. Harris 

HI 546 Reconstruction of the American Union. 3(3-0) S. This course is an in-depth study 
of the difficulties involved in the restoration and readjustment of American society after the 
Civil War. Special attention is given to social and economic conditions in the defeated South, 
military reconstruction and Republican ascendancy in the region. Harris 

HI 548 The American Response to Industrialism. 3(3-0). Focuses on the industrialization 
of the American economy and on efforts to deal with the ensuing transformation of 
American life through politics, social institutions and ideas. O'Brien 

HI 551 History and Principles of the Administration of Archives and Manuscripts. 3(3- 
0) F. A study of the nature, importance and use of original manuscript resources; the history 
and evolution of written records, and the institutions administering them. Mitchell 

HI 552 Application of Principles of Administration of Archives and Manuscripts. 

Preq.: HI 551. 3(3-0) S. Internship training and the application of the principles and practices 
of archival management. Mitchell 

HI 561 U.S. Far Eastern Relations. 3(3-0). A study of American expansion into the 
Pacific and involvement in Asian affairs. Both official diplomatic relations and unofficial 
contacts (by missionaries, educators, businessmen, and the like) are examined. Beers 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 159 

HI 565 The History of Urban Life in the U.S., 1607-1865. 3(3-0) F. The history of urban 
life in the United States, 1607-1865; this course is designed primarily to give the student an 
understanding of the historical background of today's urban problems. King 

HI 566 The History of Urban Life in the U.S., 1865-Present. 3(3-0) S. The history of ur- 
ban life in the United States, from 1865 to present. This course is designed primarily to give 
the student an understanding of the historical background of today's urban problems. 

King 

HI 572 History of Soviet Russia Since 1930. 3(3-0). Analysis of the domestic and foreign 
policies of the Soviet Union since 1930 with special emphasis on the position of the Soviet Un- 
ion in the world since 1945. Wheeler 

HI 598 Special Topics in History. 1-6, F,S. An investigation of topics of particular in- 
terest to advanced students under the direction of faculty members on a tutorial basis. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

NOTE: Prerequisite: (600 level) Six hours of advanced history or equivalent. 

HI 601 Historiography and Historical Method. 3(3-0) F. A study of the major steps in the 
development of historical investigation and writing from classical times to the present, as 
well as an analysis of the elements of good historical research and writing with some discus- 
sion of methodology used by the contemporary scholarly historian. Graduate Staff 

HI 602 Seminar in American History. 3(3-0) S. A small research seminar on special 
topics in American history. Graduate Staff 

HI 604 Seminar in European History. 3(3-0) S. A small research seminar on special topics 
in European history. Graduate Staff 

HI 606 Seminar in Diplomatic History. 3(3-0) S. A small research seminar on topics in 
diplomatic history. Brown 

HI 699 Research in History. Credits Arranged, 1-6. Individual research under graduate 
thesis supervisor. Graduate Staff 



Horticultural Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor Fred D. Cochran, Acting Head 

Professor R. L. Lower, Graduate Coordinator 

Professors: W. E. Ballinger, F. L. Haynes, R. A. Larson, C. H. Miller, P. V. Nelson, 
T. J. Monaco; Professor Emeritus: D. T. Pope; Extension Professors: J. W. Love, 
C. M. Mainland, W. A. Skroch; Associate Professors: W. R. Henderson, T. R. 
Konsler, W. B. Nesbitt, D. M. Pharr, J. C. Raulston, D. C. Sanders, R. M. 
Southall, C. R. Unrath, D. C. Zeiger; Associate Professor Emeritus: T. F. Can- 



160 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

non; Extension Associate Professor: L. G. Wilson; Assistant Professors: J. R. 
Ballington, T. E. Bilderback, M. A. Cohen, W. W. Collins, W. C. Fonteno, R. G. 
Gardner. 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: R. Aycock, R. J. Downs, R. H. Moll, T. J. Sheets, R. J. Volk; Associate 
Professor: R. L. Mott; Assistant Professor: H. J. Kirk 

Graduate study under the direction of the horticultural science faculty may lead 
to the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Areas of study in- 
clude plant physiology, plant breeding and genetics, post-harvest physiology, plant 
nutrition, growth regulators and weed science. The Master of Agriculture, a 
professional degree, can be earned by substituting additional course work for 
research requirements of graduate study. 

Facilities for graduate studies include a 41,400 square-foot greenhouse (21 sec- 
tions, each with separately controlled light and temperature); the University 
Phytotron (available for controlled environmental studies on horticultural crops); 
19 well-equipped laboratories (seven analytical, one chromatography, one soil 
testing, one seed handling and storage, three cytological/anatomical, one 
radioisotope, one tissue culture, one analytical cold laboratory, one post-harvest 
handling, one foliar analytical and one landscape); 14 controlled temperature 
storage rooms; an extensive collection of plant materials, both living and preser- 
ved; and a variety of climates and soils from coast to mountains in North Carolina 
on ten outlying research stations. 

Opportunities for employment after graduate study include teaching and 
research faculty positions in state and private universities; research and regulatory 
positions with the United States Department of Agriculture, both foreign and 
domestic; extension specialists and county agents; research, production and 
promotional work with agri-business concerned with production of horticultural 
crops or services to horticultural industries. 

Graduate teaching and research assistantships (commercial, Agricultural Foun- 
dation, or Experiment Station) for promising students are available. Students are 
encouraged to apply for assistantships at least six months prior to the anticipated 
enrollment date. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

HS 411 Nursery Management. Preqs.: BS 100, SSC 200. 3(2-3) F. 

HS 414 Residential Landscaping. Preqs.: SSC 200, HS 211, HS 212. 4(2-6) F. 

HS 421 Tree Fruit Production. Preqs.: BS 100 or BO 200, SSC 200, HS 201. 3(2-3) F. 

HS 432 Vegetable Production. Preqs.: BS 100, SSC 200. 3(2-3) F. 

HS 440 Greenhouse Management. Preqs.: BS 100, SSC 200. 3(2-3) F. 

HS 441 Floriculture I. Preqs.: BS 100, SSC 200. 3(2-3) F. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 161 

HS 442 Floriculture II. Preqs.: BS 100, SSC 200. 3(2-3) S. 

HS 471 Aboriculture. Preqs.: BS 100, SSC 200. 3(2-3) S. 

HS 491 Senior Seminar in Horticultural Science. Preq.: Consent of Department. 1(1-0) 
F. 

HS 495 Special Topics in Horticultural Science. 1-6 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

HS (CS) 514 Principles and Methods in Weed Science. Preq.: CS 414 or equivalent. 3(2- 
2) S. Studies on the losses caused by weeds, the ecology of weeds, biological control, basic con- 
cepts of weed management, herbicide-crop relationships and herbicide development. In- 
troduction to greenhouse and bioassay techniques used in herbicide work and to field 
research techniques supplemented by laboratory and field exercises. Monaco 

HS (FS) 521 Food Preservation. 3(2-3) F. (See food science, page 144.) 

HS 531 Physiology of Landscape Plants. Preq.: BO 421 or CI. 3(2-3) F. A course designed 
to cover relationships of plants to landscape environments. Study of plant function, basic 
climatology and plant physiological principles involved in the selection, utilization and main- 
tenance of physical landscape environments in exterior and interior ornamental landscape 
plantings. Raulston 

HS (CS, GN) 541 Plant Breeding Methods. 3(3-0) F. (See crop science, page 93.) 

HS (CS, GN) 542 Plant Breeding Field Procedures. 2(0-4) Sum. (See crop science, page 
93.) 

HS 552 Growth of Horticultural Plants. Preq.: BO 421. 3(2-3) F. Exercises in tissue 
culture principles and techniques as they relate to horticulture. Emphasis on endogenous 
controls of plant growth and the role of growth regulating compounds in horticultural 
research and production. Graduate Staff 

HS (FS) 562 Postharvest Physiology. Preq.: BO 421. 3(3-0) S. A study of chemical and 
physiological changes that occur during handling, transportation and storage which affect 
the quality of horticultural crops. Consideration will be given to preharvest and postharvest 
conditions which influence these changes. Graduate Staff 

HS 599 Research Principles. Preq.: CI. Credits Arranged, Maximum 6. Investigation of a 
problem in horticulture under the direction of the instructor. The students obtain practice in 
experimental techniques and procedures, critical review of literature and scientific writing. 
The problem may last one or two semesters. Credits will be determined by the nature of the 
problem, not to exceed a total of three hours for any one problem. A written report and final 
oral exam required for completion of course. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

HS (CS, GN) 613 Plant Breeding Theory. 3(3-0) S. (See crop science, page 93.) 

HS (CS, SSC) 614 Herbicide Behavior in Plants and Soils. 3(3-0) F. (See crop science, 
page 93.) 

HS 621 Methods and Evaluation of Horticultural Research. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3- 
0) F. Critical study and evaluation of technical writings and research presentation, research 
design and evaluation, photographv, and basic electronics related to horticultural research. 

Graduate Staff 



162 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

HS 622 Mineral Nutrition in Plants. Preqs.: BO 551, 552. 3(2-3) S. A comprehensive study 
of the functional roles of nutrients essential to plant growth, their interrelationships and 
their mode of influence on quality indices of horticultural crops. Consideration of the com- 
plexity of mineral nutrition experimentation and evaluation of results. Recent developments 
in nutrient sources. A detailed look at the establishment and application of foliar analysis, 
foliar fertilization, and the nutrient uptake process in plants. (Offered 1978-79 and alt. 
years.) Nelson 

HS 691 Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) F,S. Required of all horticultural science 
graduate students. Presentation of scientific articles and special lectures. Students will be 
required to present one or more papers. Graduate Staff 

HS 699 Research. Preqs.: Grad. standing in HS, consent of advisory committee chairman. 
Credits Arranged. A maximum of six credits is allowed toward the Master of Science degree; 
no limitation on credits in doctoral program. Original research on specific problems in fruit, 
vegetable and ornamental crops. Graduate Staff 



Industrial and Technical Education 



Industrial Arts Education 

For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see industrial 
and technical education and industrial arts education in the education section, page 
105. 



Industrial Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor W. A. Smith Jr., Head 

Professors: J. R. Canada, S. E. Elmaghraby, R. W. Llewellyn, R. G. Pearson, A. L. 
Prak; Professors Emeriti: C. A. Anderson, R. G. Carson Jr.; Adjunct Professor: 
A. G. Swann; Associate Professors: R. E. Alvarez, M. A. Ayoub, R. H. Bernhard, 
J. J. Harder, H. L. W. Nuttle, S. Stidham Jr.; Adjunct Associate Professor: 
R. L. Launer; Assistant Professors: E. L. Blair, J. A. Tompkins; Adjunct As- 
sistant Professor: M. J. Goodman 

Industrial engineering is concerned with solutions to problems relating to design 
and control of organizational systems, such as industrial and commercial corpora- 
tions, government agencies, and other institutions which provide goods or services 
for public consumption. Interests include the management of operations, planning 
and scheduling, manufacturing engineering, allocation of resources, dynamic 
system design, man-machine relationships, and occupational safety and health. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 163 

The department offers the degrees of Master of Industrial Engineering, Master 
of Science in both industrial engineering and management, and Doctor of 
Philosophy. The focal points of study are: management systems, ergonomics, and 
production or service systems. Typical minors are taken in statistics, economics 
and business, mathematics, psychology and other engineering disciplines. 

The M.S. degree may be taken either with or without a thesis. The thesis work 
for the M.S. degree may account for as many as six semester hours. For the non- 
thesis option a formal written report, based upon scholarly project work, is re- 
quired. No thesis is required for the M.I.E. degree. A departmental brochure which 
details the orientation and requirements for all degrees is available. No foreign 
language is required at the master's level, and a foreign language is optional with 
the student's advisory committee at the doctoral level. 

The University provides access to an outstanding computer capability: the IBM 
System/370, Model 165 with a Model 135 remote terminal on campus and several 
conveniently located input terminals, including two terminals in the department 
for use in interactive computation. Facilities for ergonomics research are also ex- 
cellent for the study of environmental factors, biomechanics and work physiology, 
and human performance assessment. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

IE 401 Stochastic Models in Industrial Engineering. Preq.: An introductory course in 
probability and/or math statistics. 3(3-0) F,S. 

IE 402 Quantitative Methods & Optimization. Preq.: IE 361. 3(3-0) F. 

IE 403 Quantitative Methods Practicum. Preqs.: IE 361, IE 401. 3(1-2) S. 

IE 420 Information & Control Systems. Preqs.: Sr. standing, course in Computer 
Programming. 3(1-4) F.S. 

IE 432 Methods Engineering. Preq.: IE 352. 3(2-3) S. 

IE 452 Ergonomics. Preq.: Sr. standing. 3(2-2) F. 

IE 453 Facilities Design. Preq.: Sr. standing in IE. 3(1-4) F. 

IE 454 Modeling of Man-Machine Systems. Preq.: IE 401. 3(2-1) S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

IE (MA, OR) 505 Mathematical Programming I. Preq.: MA 405. 3(3-0) F.Sum. A study 
of mathematical methods applied to problems of planning. Linear programming will be 
covered in detail. This course is intended for those who desire to study this subject in depth 
and detail. It provides a rigorous and complete development of the theoretical and com- 
putational aspects of this technique as well as a discussion of a number of applications. 

Graduate Staff 

IE (OR) 509 Dynamic Programming. Preqs.: MA 405, ST 421. 3(3-0) S. An introduction 
to the theory and computational aspects of dynamic programming and its application to 
sequential decision problems. Nuttle, Elmaghraby 



164 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

IE 511 Advanced Engineering Project Analysis. Preqs.: IE 311, ST 421. 3(3-0) F. 
Analysis of project economy models with certainty assumed, advantages analyses employing 
probability concepts, sensitivity studies and measures of utility. Estimation techniques and 
use of accounting information, time series analysis and judgment factors. Planning and uses 
of capital funds. Canada 

IE 515 Advanced Manufacturing Processes. Preqs.: IE 351 and EE 331 or equivalent. 
3(3-0) F. The course examines manufacturing processes which involve chemical, elec- 
trochemical, electrical, thermo-electric and non-conventional mechanical, energy modes. 
Each process is investigated as to its underlying theory, state-of-the-art technology, interac- 
tion with the workpiece material, geometric capability and economics. Harder 

IE 517 Computer- Aided Manufacturing. Preqs.: IE 351 or equivalent and computer 
programming. 3(3-0) S. This course is concerned with the integration of the elements of 
production processes into a Computer Aided Manufacturing system (CAM). Students will 
generate programs for parts production in the APT language, for plotter verification, and for 
3-axis machining. The benefits of computer aided design and graphics in designing products 
for CAM are stressed. Industry case examples of machining, assembly and continuous 
process operations are studied. Harder 

IE 521 Management Decision and Control Systems. Preqs.: IE 421, CSC 421 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Planning and development of comprehensive computer-based informa- 
tion systems to support management decisions. Formal systems concepts; management in- 
formation requirements. Management science and organizational behavior influences. Data 
bases and advanced system techniques and concepts. System evaluation and cost effec- 
tiveness. Smith, Llewellyn 

IE (OR) 522 Organizational Systems Dynamics. Preqs.: ST 371, IE 421. 3(3-0) F. A 
study of the behavior of large organizations as simulated on a large digital computer and 
driven by suitable exogenous inputs. Basic theory of feedback control of systems; methods of 
modeling for continuous simulation, including aspects of management policy. Projects cover 
study, modeling and simulation of industrial, business, political social organizations and 
systems; methods of changing system behavior by modifying parameters and model struc- 
ture. Llewellyn 

IE 523 Production Planning, Scheduling and Inventory Control. Preqs.: OR 501 and ST 
515 or equivalents. 3(3-0) S. An analysis of Production-Inventory systems. Discussion of 
commonly used planning and scheduling techniques. Introduction to the use of math model- 
ing for solution of planning and scheduling problems. Interface with quality control and in- 
formation systems. Nuttle, Alvarez 

IE 525 Organizational Planning and Control. Preqs.: Three credit hours in operations 
management (such as EB 325, IE 308). 3(3-0) S. Organization theory and systems approaches 
to administrative functions. Human and social influences of management systems for plan- 
ning and control of activity. Policy, structure and procedure related to industrial engineering 
activities. Effects of automation. (To be taught alt. years.) Smith, Pearson 

IE (PSY) 540 Human Factors in Systems Design. Preqs.: IE (PSY) 338 or IE 452; 
Coreqs.: ST 507 or 515. 3(3-0) S. Introduction to problems of the systems development cycle, 
including man-machine function allocation, military specifications, display-control com- 
patibility, the personnel sub-system concept and maintainability design. Detailed treatment 
is given to man as an information processing mechanism. Pearson 

IE 541 Systems Safety Engineering. Preqs.: IE 452, ST 371. 3(3-0) F,Sum. Problems in oc- 
cupational safety and health; preventive aspects involving product and work design, and per- 
sonnel selection. Consideration of the methods used in accident-injury study, including field 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 165 

investigation, experimental engineering and biomedical research, statistical studies, and 
fault tree analysis. Managerial aspects of safety accountability. (To be taught in alt. years.) 

Pearson, Ayoub 

IE 542 Physiological Criteria in Work Measurement. Preq.: Grad. status. 3(3-0) F. 
Emphasis is placed on basic endocrine and autonomic nervous system anatomy and 
physiology; measures reflecting sympathetic nervous system activity; concepts applicable to 
work measurement studies including a discussion of arousal theory and the concept of 
autonomic balance; and survey of current literature on equipment design and use. (To be of- 
fered in alt. years.) Ayoub 

IE 544 Occupational Biomechanics. Preq.: Grad. standing in engineering. 3(2-2) F. 
General concepts and techniques of understanding the anatomical and physiological bases of 
human motion. Characteristics and limitations of human motor capabilities, body 
mechanics, and use of biomedical instrumentation for monitoring and quantifying human 
performance. Applications of biomechanics in work, industry, rehabilitation, sports, space 
research and safety are also considered. (To be offered in alt. years.) Ayoub 

IE 547 Reliability and Quality Assurance. Preq.: One of the following: IE 308, IE 371, ST 
421 or ST 515. 3(3-0) S. An introduction to basic concepts of reliability and quality assurance. 
Application of probability and statistics to estimation and control of quality and reliability 
of industrial processes. Control charts and acceptance sampling. Reliability estimation, life 
testing. Failure distributions and rates. Reliability of systems: series, parallel, and monotone 
systems. Maintenance of systems. Redundancy optimization. Quality management in in- 
dustrial systems. Stidham, Prak, Alvarez 

IE 553 Materials Handling Systems. Preq.: IE 453. 3(3-0) S. Analysis, design, evaluation 
and implementation of materials handling systems. Principles, functions, equipment con- 
cepts and traditional approaches of materials handling. Impact of facilities design on 
materials handling and application of quantitative techniques to materials handling systems 
design. Description of factors and approaches to materials handling management and the 
criticality of properly designed and operated material flow systems. Tompkins 

IE 556 Industrial Logistics. Preq.: IE 453. 3(3-0) F. Materials management, materials 
flow and physical distribution. Management of activities required to move raw materials, 
parts and finished inventory from vendors, within an enterprise and to customers. This 
course will cover the design and operation of effective industrial logistics systems. 

Tompkins 

IE (OR) 561 Queues and Stochastic Service Systems. Preq.: MA 421. 3(3-0) F. General 
concepts of stochastic processes are introduced. Poisson processes, Markov processes and 
renewal theory are presented. These are then used in the analysis of queues, starting with a 
completely memoryless queue to one with general parameters. Applications to many 
engineering problems will be considered. Stidham 

IE (CSC, OR) 562 Advanced Topics in Computer Simulation. 3(3-0) S. (See computer 
science, page 87.) 

IE (MA, OR) 586 Network Flows. Preqs.: IE (OR, MA) 505 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. This 
course will study problems of flows in networks. These problems will include the determina- 
tion of the shortest chain, maximal flow and minimal cost flow in networks. The relationship 
between network flows and linear programming will be developed as well as problems with 
nonlinear cost functions, multicommodity flows and the problem of network synthesis. (Of- 
fered in alt. years.) Graduate Staff 



166 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

IE 591 Project Work. Preq.: Grad. or sr. standing. 1-6. Investigation and report on an 
assigned problems for students enrolled in the fifth-year curriculum in industrial engineer- 
ing. Graduate Staff 

IE (PSY) 593 Area Seminar in Ergonomics. 1(0-2) F. (See psychology, page 230.) 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

IE 608 Linear Programming Applications. Preq.: IE (MA, OR) 505 or EB 555. 3(3-0) S. 
The application of linear programming to large problems of a practical nature; product mix, 
diet, scheduling and blending problems; problem generation, control of accuracy, report 
generation. Stress is laid on post-optimal studies, multiple-objective functions and right- 
hand sides; parametric programming on the right-hand side, the objective function, the rim 
and the interior. Decomposition of various types of problems will receive considerable atten- 
tion with extensions into some nonlinear system. (Offered in alt. years.) Graduate Staff 

IE 61 1 The Design of Production Systems. Preqs.: IE (MA, OR) 505, OR 501. 3(3-0) F. The 
study of production systems: the model, the criterion, decision making and optimization, 
levels of decision. The graphic representation of systems: signal flow graphs, activity 
analysis, networks of flow models. The machine assignment problem, scheduling and 
sequencing, line balancing location-allocation of new facilities. The use of computers in the 
design of production systems. (Offered in alt. years.) Elmaghraby 

IE 621 Advanced Problems in Management Systems Engineering. Preq.: CI. 1-4 S. 
Coverage of advanced techniques, current research and contemporary problems in analysis, 
design and operation of management systems. Varied topics will cover aspects of economic 
decision analysis, cost effectiveness, information flow, system performance evaluation, and 
modern organization concepts. Smith, Canada, Llewellyn, Bernhard 

IE 622 Inventory Control Methods II. Preq.: IE 523. 3(3-0) F. A continuation of IE 523; 
stochastic inventory systems of lot sized-reorder type; periodic review and single period 
models. Application of dynamic programming theory to deterministic and stochastic cases. 

Nuttle 

IE (PSY) 640 Skilled Operator Performance. Preqs.: PSY 545, ST 507, or ST 515. 3(3-0) 
F. Theories of the human operators are considered with regard to the classical problems of 
monitoring, vigilance and tracking. Factors such as biological rhythm, sleep loss, sensory 
restriction, environmental stress and time-sharing are considered as they interact with and 
determine overall systems efficiency. (Offered in alt. years.) Pearson 

IE 641 Environmental Factors and Human Performance. Preqs.: IE (PSY) 540 and IE 
542 or other equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Study of major problem areas, methodology, theory and ex- 
perimental work in biotechnology; interaction among engineering, biological and behavioral 
factors in design for safety and survival; physiology and biomechanics of acceleration, 
deceleration and pressure altitude; consideration of operator effectiveness in submarine, 
extra-terrestrial, arctic and desert environments; techniques in evaluation of crash dynamics 
and pathology; closed-ecological systems. (Offered in alt. years.) Pearson 

IE 651 Special Studies in Industrial Engineering. Preq.: Grad. standing. Credits 
Arranged. The purpose of this course is to allow individual students or small groups of stu- 
dents to undertake studies of special areas in industrial engineering which fit into their par- 
ticular program and which may not be covered by an existing industrial engineering 
graduate level course. Problems may require individual research and initiative in the ap- 
plication of industrial engineering training to new areas or fields. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 167 

IE (OR, MA) 692 Special Topics in Mathematical Programming. Preq.: IE (MA, OR) 
505. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. The study of special advanced topics in the area of mathematical 
programming. New techniques and current research in this area will be discussed. The 
faculty responsible for this course will select the areas to be covered during the semester ac- 
cording to their preference and interest. This course will not necessarily be taught by an in- 
dividual faculty member but can, on occasion, be a joint effort of several faculty members 
from this University as well as visiting faculty from other institutions. To date, a course of 
Theory of Networks and another on Integer Programming have been offered under the um- 
brella of this course. It is anticipated that these two topics will be repeated in the future 
together with other topics. Graduate Staff 

IE 693 Seminar in Applied Ergonomics. Preqs.: IE (PSY) 540, ST 515. 1(0-2) S. Discus- 
sion of contemporary issues involving the systems approach to accident prevention and in- 
jury control. History of safety research; federal health, industrial and military activities in 
safety; current centers of safety research and their activity. Pearson, Ayoub 

IE 694 Advanced Problems in Ergonomics. Preqs.: IE (PSY) 540, ST 515. 3(3-0) F. Ex- 
ploration in depth of a problem area of contemporary interest involving the man-machine- 
environment interface. Class discussion and analysis of research and theory, with special 
focus on the human factors aspects of systems design and operation. Pearson, Ayoub 

IE 695 Seminar. 1(1-0) S. Seminar discussion of industrial engineering problems for 
graduate students. Case analyses and reports. Graduate Staff 

IE 699 Industrial Engineering Research. Preq.: Grad. standing. Credits Arranged. 
F,S,Sum. Graduate research in industrial engineering for thesis credit. Graduate Staff 



International Development 

Professor J . Rigney, Dean 

The world is moving inexorably toward greater interchange of people and greater 
volume of commerce between nations, and the number of Americans going abroad 
each year for business and pleasure is increasing. This growing interchange among 
nations requires the services of skilled persons in all walks of life, but they must be 
persons who have the capability to move and work effectively between our culture 
and others. A variety of employment opportunities are available to persons who 
are well qualified in a particular profession or discipline and who also know the 
language and cultural background of other parts of the world. 

The degree of Master of Technology for International Development is designed to 
give an international orientation and perspective to the master's degree which is 
sought in any of the scientific and professional fields represented at this Univer- 
sity. It is designed to provide specialized training for students who are interested in 
utilizing their skills in international activities, whether technical, consultative or 
administrative in character. 

The program of study is tailored to the student's individual needs rather than 
following a prescribed course. The relevant department assists in choosing a set of 
courses which provide background in the professional area, and the Dean for Inter- 



168 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

national Programs assists in identifying appropriate "internationalizing" courses 
which satisfy the student's particular needs. 

General requirements for admission are: a bachelor's degree from a college or 
university recognized as standard by a regional or general accrediting agency, and 
at least a "B" grade average in one's undergraduate major. 

The program of work for this degree includes the following: 

1. A total of 36 semester credits is required, at least half of which must be in the 
relevant professional area (e.g., animal science, politics, engineering, etc.). The 
remainder of the course work provides special orientation, sensitivity and un- 
derstanding for working in a foreign culture. In the "internationalizing" courses, 12 
semester credits may be drawn from courses at the 300 and 400 levels, of which no 
more than six credits may be taken from the 300 level. 

2. A minimum field experience of 12 weeks in a foreign country and a report on 
the field experience is required. 

3. Conversational facility in one foreign language is necessary. 

4. The examination requirements are the same as for the Master of Science 
degree. 



Landscape Architecture 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Associate Professor A. L. Sullivan, Program Director 

Professors: T. O. Perry, C. E. McKinney, R. R. Wilkinson; Professor Emeritus: E. 
G. Thurlow; Associate Professors: A. R. Abbate, R. T. Hester Jr., J. C. Raulston; 
Visiting Associate Professor: S. Baker; Assistant Professors: G. F. Gumz, D. 
Wood; Lecturer: R. Stipe; Visiting Lecturers: R. Altman, R. M. Leary 

The program leading to the degree, Master of Landscape Architecture, provides 
the student with a structure in which he or she may explore changing environmen- 
tal situations and develop comprehensive skills and insights into methods of 
analysis and design. A minimum of four semesters of academic work is required. It 
consists of a core of theory and concepts, a concentration, a workshop/studio 
sequence stressing research and design applications and a minor area of study. 

The program of each student can be developed to suit individual needs in con- 
junction with an advisory committee made up of two program faculty members 
and a faculty member representing the minor. Core courses may be selected from 
the various graduate level lectures and seminars within the School of Design. 
Within the landscape architecture program, there are concentrations available 
which focus upon community design and development, landscape planning, or land 
development and site planning. Students who have not pursued undergraduate 
studies in landscape architecture or environmental design will be expected to 
demonstrate equivalent experience or to register for undergraduate courses which 
provide equivalent experience. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 169 

The minor program can be selected from any of the related areas of study offered 
at North Carolina State, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill or Duke 
University. 

In addition to course work, the student is required to develop a major project 
which integrates the course and studio materials he or she covered. There is a com- 
prehensive oral examination in the final semester of residence. 

Students with a variety of disciplinary backgrounds will be admitted to the 
program to ensure a mixture of student objectives and perspectives. The 
program— while focusing on individual student needs and aspirations— will stress 
competence in the areas of community design, environmental analysis, analysis of 
user needs, post-development evaluation and general proficiency in design and 
communication. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

LAR 400 Intermediate Landscape Architecture Design (Series). Preq.: DF 102. 6(0-9) 

F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

LAR 510 Participatory Communication Techniques for Designers. Preq.: Grad. 
standing or CI; Coreq.: LAR 600. 3(1-2) F. A techniques course in which students learn and 
apply the communication skills necessary in participatory design. An emphasis is placed on 
communication as a problem-solving process, on visual thinking and on graphic and small 
group techniques. 

LAR 511 Community Design Policy. Preq.: Grad. standing or CI. 3(3-0) S. The course ex- 
plores the theory and practices of the social policy impact on the designed environment and 
users of that environment. The public community development process is studied as it 
relates to the built environment. 

LAR 512 Landscape Resource Management. Preq.: DN 431 or CI. 3(1-4) S. Laboratory 
techniques course in the methodology of analysis and management of natural resources as it 
relates to landscape architecture. Case study approach to managed resource systems using 
spatial mapping and analysis techniques. 

LAR 521 Values, Theory and Methods of Landscape Architecture. Preq.: Grad. 
standing. 3(3-0) F. The profession of landscape architecture has undergone radical change in 
the past decade. Regional analysis, landscape assessment, land development, urban plan- 
ning, recreation planning, etc., are new and emerging roles for the landscape architect. This 
course will develop the core values and theories from which each have emerged and survey 
the techniques and methods of their development. 

LAR (PD, ARC) 571 Issues in Housing. 3(3-0) F. (See architecture, page 58.) 

LAR 575 Land Development. Preq.: Grad. standing or CI. 3(3-0) F,S. The seminar pre- 
sents the concepts, processes and principles used in the design and development of com- 
munities. The discussions will focus on a general development process, the development team 
and on the role of the designer in the context of the team. A wide range of project types will 
be discussed. The seminar presents the relationships of public regulatory policies and 
programs to the community design and development process. 

LAR 591 Special Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F,S. Seminars on subjects of 
current interest in design which are presented by persons not part of the regular faculty. 



170 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

LAR 592 Special Topics. Preq.: Grad. standing. 2-3 F,S. Topics of current interest to the 
programs in the School of Design offered by faculty in the School. Subjects offered under 
this number are normally used to test and develop new courses. 

LAR 595 Independent Study. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F,S,Sum. Special problems in 
various aspects of design developed under the direction of a faculty member on a tutorial 
basis. 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

LAR 600 Landscape Design Studio. Preq.: Grad. standing. 6(0-12) F,S. The application of 
information and skills developed in course work to environmental design problems. A 
process of site selection, activity programming, site planning, and program evaluation is 
followed which employs the creation of interactive communication systems between the 
designer, clients and users. Goals include the design of satisfying new landscapes as well as 
conservation and design strategies for existing culturally important landscapes and 
townscapes. 

LAR 612 Social Factors Analysis in Site Planning. Preq.: LAR 511 or CI. 3(2-1) S. The 
course explores social factors techniques and research applications to the design of the 
landscape. Interaction, neighborhood theory, and user preference analysis techniques will be 
presented through discussion and development of research and case studies. 

LAR 691 Degree Seminar. Preqs.: 3 LAR 600 studios. 0. Each student in his or her ter- 
minal semester and in conjunction with the terminal case study will prepare and submit to 
his or her committee a presentation on the relevance of one's minor to the design process 
with particular reference to the individual's case study. 

LAR 698 Advanced Research Projects. Preqs.: 2 LAR 600 studios or CI. 2-6 F,S. 
Graduate students sufficiently prepared may undertake selected research investigations. A 
proposal for such investigations must be submitted prior to consent for enrollment. 



Management 

The degree Master of Science in management is a unique offering by North 
Carolina State University. It is a multidepartmental program combining the 
resources of the several technical areas within the University. Current participants 
are economics and business, industrial engineering, operations research, statistics, 
and textiles. The degree program is designed to permit the student to acquire the 
principles of management decision making and to provide the student with the op- 
portunity to extend the foundation principles of management to the functional 
areas in which he may work. The extension is accomplished by electing 12 to 15 
hours in a technical option from the total of 30 hours of graduate course work re- 
quired of each student. The 12 to 15 hours would be in courses designated by an ad- 
visory committee of faculty members from the participating departments. These 
courses will make up what is titled the technical option for each student's degree 
program. The technical option will be designed to form a coordinated pattern of 
study developing professional capabilities in the specified field of work. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 171 

Graduates of any accredited four-year baccalaureate program may apply. Due to 
the quantitative nature of the program a full year course in calculus and a first 
course in linear or matrix algebra should have been completed. In the Master of 
Science in management program there are four specific courses designated as core 
courses that will be required of every student. These are EB 501, Price Theory; EB 
502, Income and Employment Theory; OR 501, Introduction to Operations 
Research; and ST 421, Introduction to Mathematical Statistics. In addition, one or 
two business economics electives will be required along with a minimum of four or 
five courses in the technical option. 

To enable the students to progress from an established base of knowledge of 
business practices, all students will be expected to present a background prepara- 
tion in what are termed the foundation courses. Students whose undergraduate 
major has been either business or economics will very likely have taken all or at 
least most of these courses. If the designated courses or their equivalents have not 
been included in the student's preparatory work, their absence may be remedied by 
taking appropriate courses offered by the Department of Economics and Business. 
The entire 18 semester hours of undergraduate foundation course work may be 
waived for candidates who have completed such a set of courses or their equivalent. 

The degree Master of Science in management is a professional degree rather than 
a research degree. A thesis is not required, but to demonstrate professional accom- 
plishment a project paper will be required in the final 600-level course. Defense of 
the project analysis will constitute the primary basis for the final oral examination 
by the student's Graduate Advisory Committee. 

For those students who wish to pursue a course of part-time study an evening 
program has been prepared. There will be a sufficient number of courses available 
to permit a student to complete a minimal program for the degree Master of 
Science in management. Until enrollments grow larger it will not be possible to 
make every option and course available during the evening, but with somewhat less 
flexibility than for the full-time program it will be possible to obtain the degree. 

Additional information about the program may be obtained from the Coor- 
dinator of the Master of Science in Management Program, Department of 
Economics and Business, 201 Patterson Hall, North Carolina State University, 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607. 



Marine Sciences 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor L. J. Langfelder, Chairman 

Professors: M. Amein, B. J. Copeland, J. A. Edwards, W. W. Hassler, C. J. Leith, I. 
S. Longmuir, W. J. Saucier, C. C. Tung, C. W. Welby, J. C. Williams III; 
Associate Professors: V. V. Cavaroc Jr., C. E. Knowles, J. L. Machemehl, L. J. 
Pietrafesa, L. H. Royster, F. Y. Sorrell Jr., A. H. Weber; Adjunct Assonat* 
Professor: N. E. Huang; Extension Professor: F. B. Thomas; Assistant 
Professors: J. A. Daggerhart Jr., J. M. Miller, T. G. Wolcott 



172 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

The oceans are perhaps man's last great frontier on earth. Further un- 
derstanding of the oceans and effective utilization of their resources depends upon 
a thorough knowledge of the geography of the sea and its logistics, the mineral 
resources of the sea and their extraction, the biological resources of the sea and 
their utilization, ocean pollution, and deep sea and coastal engineering. North 
Carolina is richly endowed with marine environments and resources. The State has 
over 300 miles of shoreline which enclose about 2,500 square miles of shallow 
sounds and associated habitats. In addition, an extensive continental shelf and 
proximity to the Gulf Stream and cold northern waters make for rich and varied 
opportunities for the study of marine science. 

The curriculum in marine sciences brings together the faculties and facilities of 
both the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State Un- 
iversity to offer broad graduate training in the various areas of marine sciences. 
The program gives students a wide choice of faculty advisers, marine science 
courses and potential research projects. Departments on the North Carolina State 
campus involved in this curriculum include biochemistry, botany, chemistry, civil 
engineering, economics and business, food science, geosciences, mechanical and 
aerospace engineering, microbiology, physics, soil science and zoology. 

A variety of facilities are available to students wishing to do research in marine 
sciences. The Department of Zoology operates a fisheries-oriented laboratory on 
Cape Hatteras. The State of North Carolina has recently completed construction on 
marine resources facilities in Dare and New Hanover counties. Facilities are 
available at each of these laboratories for applied research. 

For admission to the curriculum in marine sciences, an undergraduate degree is 
required in a basic science such as bacteriology, biology, botany, chemistry, 
engineering, geology, physics or zoology. A graduate student may choose to major 
in marine sciences or one may major in a field represented by a regular department 
and minor in marine sciences. Marine sciences degrees offered are the Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy. A major in marine sciences is normally expected 
to be familiar with other areas of marine sciences in addition to the area in which 
one specializes. In order to provide for some breadth within the program, physical 
oceanography, biological oceanography, geological oceanography, chemical 
oceanography, and meteorological oceanography have been designated as core 
areas. It is normally expected that the graduate student will take two or more of 
these courses outside the area of specialization. Requirements for the minor, the 
thesis, the language, admission to candidacy, residence and final examinations are 
as specified in the regulations of the Graduate School. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

MAS (MAE) 471 Undersea Vehicle Design. Preq.: ESM 303 or MAE 355. 3(3-0) F,S. 
MAS (CE, OY) 487 Physical Oceanography. Preqs.: MA 202 and PY 212. 3(3-0) F. 
FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MAS (MY) 526 Air-Sea Interaction. 3(3-0) Alt. F.S. (See meteorology, page 194.) 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 173 

MAS (ZO) 529 Biological Oceanography. 3(3-0) F. (See zoology, page 271.) 

MAS (OY, CE) 541 Gravity Wave Theory I. 3(3-0) S. (See physical oceanography, page 
209.) 

MAS (OY) 551 Ocean Circulation. 3(3-0) S. (See physical oceanography, page 209.) 

MAS (OY, MAE) 563 Geophysical Fluid Mechanics. 3(3-0) Alt. F. (See physical 
oceanography, page 209.) 

MAS (CE) 581 Introduction to Oceanographic Engineering. 3(3-0) F. (See civil 
engineering, page 80.) 

MAS (GY) 584 Marine Geology. 3(3-0) S. (See geology, page 154.) 

MAS 591, 592 Marine Sciences Seminar. 1(1-0) S. A seminar designed to give perspec- 
tive in the field of marine science. Topics vary from semester to semester. In order to obtain 
credit a student must deliver a seminar. 

UNC-CH MAS 101 General Oceanography. 3(3-0) F. A study of the seas and their 
processes. 

UNC-CH MAS 105 (ESE 128) Chemical Oceanography. 3(3-0) S. A variation and 
abundance of sea water constituents. The chemical, physical and biological processes con- 
tributing to the distribution and problems of dispersion of conservative and nonconservative 
substances are considered. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MAS (OY) 601, 602 Advanced Physical Oceanography I, II. 3(3-0) F,S. (See physical 
oceanography, page 209.) 

MAS (OY, MAE) 663 Advanced Geophysical Fluid Mechanics. 3(3-0) Alt. S. (See 
physical oceanography, page 209.) 

MAS (OY, MAE) 664, 665 Perturbation Method in Fluid Mechanics I, II. 3(3-0) F,S. 
(See physical oceanography, page 209.) 

MAS 693 Special Topics in Marine Sciences. Preqs.: Grad. standing and CI. 1-3. This 
course will provide the opportunity for advanced graduate students to study in special 
problem areas in marine sciences. Various areas in the program may use this course con- 
currently in their areas. 

MAS 699 Research in Marine Sciences. Preqs.: Grad. standing and consent of advisory 
committee. Credits Arranged. F,S. 



Materials Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor W. W. Austin, Head 

Professors: J. R. Beeler Jr., R. B. Benson Jr., A. A. Fahmy, J. K. Magor, C. R. Man- 
ning Jr., K. L. Moazed; Research Professors: H. Palmour III, H. H. Stadelmaier, 



174 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

R. F. Stoops; Professor Emeritus: W. W. Kriegel; Adjunct Professors: H. M. 
Davis, G. Mayer; Associate Professors: R. F. Davis, J. V. Hamme, G. 0. Harrell; 
Adjunct Assistant Professor: J. C. Hurt 

The Department of Materials Engineering offers graduate programs leading to 
the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Graduate courses in 
materials science and engineering are also offered for the benefit of students ma- 
joring in other areas who may wish to obtain a minor in materials fields. 

Financial assistance is available to qualified graduate students in materials 
engineering. Graduate assistantships permit half-time studies toward advanced 
degrees, and half time to be devoted to teaching or research. Sponsored fellowships 
and traineeships that permit full-time graduate study are available on a com- 
petitive basis. Applications should be made to the department. 

During the past decade rapid developments in aerospace, electronics and nuclear 
technologies, and an array of societal problems and their attendant materials 
problems have resulted in increased emphasis on graduate study and research on 
the fundamental properties and behavior of materials, as well as on applications- 
oriented research. 

Graduate programs in materials engineering are highly flexible. The department 
refrains from establishing a rigidly formalized sequence of courses for advanced 
degree candidates and recognizes flexibility as of utmost importance regardless of 
the candidate's prior specialization. Emphasis may be placed upon fundamental 
research or upon the application of basic concepts in materials science to various 
engineering and societal problems. 

Therefore, the programs of study for graduate students majoring in materials 
are determined by the candidate in consultation with one's adviser and graduate 
committee, and depend on the background and the needs of the candidate. 

The departmental faculty is strong in metallurgical engineering and ceramic 
engineering. A cooperative program with the chemical engineering department 
provides for graduate study and research in polymeric materials. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

MAT 400 Metallic Materials in Engineering Design. Preq.: MAT 200 or 201. 3(3-0) F,S. 

MAT 417 Ceramic Subsystem Design. Preq.: MAT 312. 3(2-3) S. 

MAT 423 Materials Factors in Design I. Preq.: MAT 450. 3(1-6) F. 

MAT 431 Physical Metallurgy I. Preq.: MAT 321. 3(2-3) F. 

MAT 435 Physical Ceramics I. Preq.: MAT 321. 3(2-3) F. 

MAT 437 Introduction to the Vitreous State. Preq.: MAT 301. 3(3-0) S. 

MAT 450 Mechanical Properties of Materials. Preqs.: ESM 207, MAT 200 or MAT 201 or 

MAT 310. 3(2-3) S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 175 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MAT 500 Modern Concepts in Materials Science. Preq.: MAT 321. 3(3-0) F. Applications 
of current theories of materials such as crystal theory, continuum and quasi-continuum 
theories, phenomenological theories, etc., to the solution of materials problems. 

MAT 503 Ceramic Microscopy. Preq.: GY 331. 3(2-3) F. Transmitted and reflected light 
techniques for the systematic study of ceramic materials and products. 

MAT 509 High Vacuum Technology. Preq.: CH 433 or MAE 301. 3(2-3) F,S. Properties of 
low-pressure gases and vapors. Production, maintenance and measurement of high vacuum; 
design, construction and operation of high vacuum high temperature facilities. Properties 
and reactions of materials which are processed, tested and/or utilized in high vacuum 
environments. 

MAT 510 Structure of Crystalline Materials. Preq.: MAT 411; Coreq. MAT 500. 3(3-0) F. 
The lattice structure of crystals, including group theory applications, reciprocal lattice 
concept and the study of crystal structure as related to bonding. 

MAT 520 Theory and Structure of Materials. Preq.: MAT 510. 3(3-0) S. Structure of li- 
quids, and crystalline and amorphous solids used in engineering systems. Crystallinity and 
thermal properties. Ionic crystals in ceramic systems. The metallic state and alloy behavior. 
Emphasis is placed on the relation between fundamental materials parameters and 
engineering properties. 

MAT 527 Refractories in Service. Preq.: MAT 411. 3(3-0) S. A study of the physical and 
chemical properties of the more important refractories in respect to their environment in in- 
dustrial and laboratory furnaces. 

MAT 529 Properties of High Temperature Materials. Preqs.: MAT 201 and MAE 301. 
3(3-0) S. Effects of temperature on the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of in- 
organic materials; relationships between microstructure and high temperature properties; 
applications of ceramics, metals and composites at elevated temperatures. 

MAT 530 Phase Transformations in Materials I. Coreq.: MAT 500. 3(3-0) F,S. Kinetic 
theory of transformations, nucleation theory, homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation, 
growth of crystals, epitaxial thin films. 

MAT (MAE) 531 Materials Processing by Deformation. 3(3-0) F. (See mechanical and 
aerospace engineering, page 186.) 

MAT (MAE) 532 Fundamentals of Metal Machining Theory. 3(3-0) S. (See mechanical 
and aerospace engineering, page 186.) 

MAT 533, 534 Advanced Ceramic Engineering Design I, II. Preq.: MAT 417. 3(2-3) F,S. 
Advanced studies in analysis and design of ceramic products, processes and systems leading 
to original solutions of current industrial problems and the development of new concepts of 
manufacturing. 

MAT 540 Glass Technology. Preq.: MAT 437. 3(3-0) F. Fundamentals of glass manufac- 
ture including compositions, properties and application of the principal types of commercial 
glasses. 

MAT 541, 542 Principles of Corrosion I, II. Preqs.: MAT 201 and CH 431 or MAE 301. 
3(2-3) F,S. The fundamentals of metallic corrosion and passivity. The electro-chemical 
nature of corrosive attack, basic forms of corrosion, corrosion rate factors, methods of corro- 
sion protection. Laboratory work included. 



176 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

MAT 550 Dislocation Theory. Preq.: MAT 450. 3(3-0) F. Structure, energetics, stress and 
strain fields, interactions and motion of dislocations in solids. 

MAT 556 Composite Materials. Preq.: MAT 450. 3(3-0) F. Basic principles underlying the 
properties of composite materials as related to properties of the individual constituents and 
their interactions. Emphasis is placed on the design of composite systems to yield desired 
combinations of properties. 

MAT (NE) 562 Materials Problems in Nuclear Engineering. Preq.: Advanced un- 
dergrad. standing. 3(3-0) F. Reactor design and operating considerations determined by 
materials properties are covered. Emphasis is placed on the interrelations among materials, 
compatibility effects, corrosion effects and radiation effects in fission and fusion reactors. 

MAT (NE) 573 Computer Experiments in Materials and Nuclear Engineering. Preq.: 
Advanced undergrad. standing. 3(3-0) S. Monte Carlo and dynamical computer experiments 
are covered from the standpoint of how to design and use them in materials and nuclear 
engineering work. 

MAT 595 Advanced Materials Experiments. Preq.: Sr. or grad. standing. 1-3. Advanced 
engineering principles applied to a specific experimental project dealing with materials. A 
seminar period is provided and a written report is required. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MAT 601 Ceramic Phase Relationships. Preq.: CI. 3(3-0) S. Heterogeneous equilibrium 
phase transformations, dissociation, fusion, lattice energy, defect structure, thermodynamic 
properties of ionic phases and silicate melts. 

MAT 603 Advanced Ceramic Reaction Kinetics. Preq.: MAT 510. 3(3-0) S. Fundamental 
study of the kinetics of high temperature ceramic reactions such as diffusion, nucleation, 
grain growth, recrystallization, phase transformation, vitrification and sintering. 

MAT 610 X-ray Diffraction. Preq.: MAT 510. 3(3-0) F. The properties and scattering 
behavior of x-rays by electrons, ions and atoms. Theory and applications of x-ray diffraction 
techniques such as Laue back reflection, the rotating crystal and powder methods, texture 
studies and residual stress analysis. 

MAT 615 Electron Microscopy. Preqs.: MAT 550, 610. 3(3-0) F. Theory of imaging and 
diffraction of electrons. Analysis of structures using electron microscopy. 

MAT 621 Theory and Structure of Amorphous Materials. Preq.: MAT 520. 3(3-0) S. 
Bond types and structure of amorphous solids, relations of bond types and structure to flow 
mechanisms, electrical, optical and thermal properties. 

MAT 622 Theory and Structure of Ceramic Materials. Preq.: MAT 520. 3(3-0) F. Elec- 
trical and optical properties of non-conducting materials, ferro-electric behavior and 
materials parameters, magnetic properties of non-metallics, semi-conducting materials. 

MAT 623 Theory and Structure of Metallic Materials. Preq.: MAT 520. 3(3-0) F. The 
metallic state, its atomic and electronic structure. Electron theory of metals and alloys. Ad- 
vanced methods of determining electronic structure in metallic materials. 

MAT 630 Phase Transformation in Materials II. Preqs.: MAT 510, 530, 550. 3(3-0) F. 
Formal theories of solid-solid transformations, transformation mechanisms, transformation 
morphologies. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 177 

MAT 631, 632 Advanced Physical Ceramics I, II. Coreqs.: MAT 510, 610 or MAT 530, 
630 or CE 511, 512 or PY 503, 552. 3(2-3) F.S. Lattice structures and lattice energies in 
crystalline ceramics; relationships with elastic, optical and thermal properties. Effects of 
constitution and microstructure on lattice-sensitive properties. The defect crystalline state 
in ceramics; vacancies, color centers; dislocations, boundaries. Crystal growth. Plastic defor- 
mation processes, including creep and fatigue; the ductile-brittle transition. Structure- 
sensitive properties of crystalline, vitreous and composite ceramics; effects of constitution, 
microstructure and non-stoichiometry. 

MAT 633 Advanced Mechanical Properties of Materials. Preq.: MAT 630. 3(3-0) F. The 
theories of yield strength, work hardening, creep, fracture, and fatigue of crystalline 
materials will be developed in terms of dislocation theory. 

MAT 661 Diffraction Theory. Preq.: MAT 610. 3(3-0) F. The diffraction of light, x-rays, 
electrons and neutrons by matter is represented in Fourier space, and the known methods of 
generating the Fourier transform (usually atomic structure) are reviewed. Exploration, by 
high and low angle scattering techniques, of crystals, paracrystals, liquids, polydispersed 
aggregates, and fibers. Feasibility of direct analysis by convolution integrals. 

MAT 691, 692 Special Topics in Materials Engineering. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3. 
Special studies of advanced topics in materials engineering. 

MAT 695 Materials Engineering Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Reports and discussion of special 
topics in materials engineering and allied fields. 

MAT 699 Materials Engineering Research. Credits Arranged. Independent investiga- 
tion of an appropriate research problem. A report on this investigation is required as a 
graduate thesis. 



Mathematics 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. M. Ortega, Head 

Professors: J. W. Bishir, E. E. Burniston, R. E. Chandler— Graduate Ad- 
ministrator, J. M. A. Danby, W. G. Dotson Jr., R. 0. Fulp, W. J. Harrington, K. 
Koh, J. R. Kolb, P. E. Lewis, J. Luh, R. H. Martin Jr., P. A. Nickel, H. V. Park, N. 
J. Rose, H. Sagan, H. E. Speece, R. A. Struble, H. R. van der Vaart, 0. Wesler; 
Professors Emeriti: R. C. Bullock, J. M. Clarkson, H. A. Fisher, J. Levine, H. M. 
Nahikian, L. S. Winton; Associate Professors: S. L. Campbell, J. C. Dunn, R. 
Gellar, R. E. Hartwig, J. E. Huneycutt Jr., J. A. Marlin, C. D. Meyer, L. B. Page, 
C. V. Pao, M. Putcha, J. A. Roulier, R. Silber, E. L. Stitzinger, W. M. Waters Jr., 
J. B. Wilson; Associate Professor Emeritus: J. W. Querry; Assistant Professors: 
H. J. Charlton, L. O. Chung, J. D. Cohen, J. E. Franke, M. L. Gardner, D. E. Gar- 
outte, D. J. Hansen, T. J. Lada, D. M. Latch, M. A. Mostow, J. Nelson Jr., S. O. 
Paur, R. T. Ramsay, S. Schecter, J. F. Selgrade, M. F. Singer, P. D. Sommers, J. 
L. Sox Jr., D. F. Ullrich, R. E. White 



178 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

The Mathematics Department offers programs leading to the degrees of Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy with a major in either mathematics or applied 
mathematics. 

Applicants for admission should have an undergraduate degree in mathematics 
or its equivalent. This should include a year of mathematical analysis (or advanced 
calculus) and a year of modern algebra, including linear algebra. All applicants are 
requested to take the Graduate Record Examination including the Advanced Test 
in Mathematics. 

A number of teaching assistantships are available. A student carrying a half- 
time assistantship is allowed to carry a course load of nine semester hours. 

The requirements for the Master of Science degree include 30-33 semester hours 
of approved credits and a comprehensive examination. A master's thesis is op- 
tional. Foreign languages are not required for the master's degree. 

There is no prescribed minimum number of courses for the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. Normally a student will take approximately 60 semester hours of 
course credits including certain core courses in algebra, analysis, topology and ap- 
plied mathematics. Independent reading and participation in seminars constitute 
an indispensable part of the doctoral program. 

All doctoral students are required to have a reading knowledge of two modern 
foreign languages. Comprehensive examinations are also required. These consist of 
a written examination designed to test basic knowledge of algebra, analysis, 
topology and applied mathematics, and an oral examination on material related to 
the field of proposed thesis work. 

The heart of the doctoral program is the dissertation. It must be original 
research resulting in a significant contribution in some area of mathematics or its 
applications and should be worthy of publication in the current literature. The doc- 
toral dissertation must be defended at the final oral examination. 

A detailed statement of requirements for graduate degrees is available on re- 
quest from the graduate administrator. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

MA 401 Applied Differential Equations II. Preq.: MA 301 or 312. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. 

MA 403 Introduction to Modern Algebra. Preq.: One year of calculus. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

MA 404 Affine and Projective Geometry. Preqs.: MA 405 and 403. 3(3-0) S. 

MA 405 Introduction to Linear Algebra and Matrices. Preq.: One year of calculus. 3(3-0) 
F.S.Sum. 

MA 408 Foundations of Euclidean Geometry. Preq.: MA 403. 3(3-0) F. 

MA 410 Theory of Numbers. Preq.: One year of calculus. 3(3-0) S. 

MA 412 Introduction to Combinatorics. Preq.: MA 403 or CSC 322. 3(3-0) F. 

MA 414 Introduction to Differential Geometry. Preqs.: MA 202 and 405. 3(3-0) S. 

MA 421 Introduction to Probability. Preq.: One year of calculus. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 179 

MA 425 Mathematical Analysis I. Preq.: MA 202 (MA 303 desirable). 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. 

MA 426 Mathematical Analysis II. Preqs.: MA 425 and MA 405. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. 

MA (CSC) 427 Introduction to Numerical Analysis I. Preqs.: MA 301 or 312, and 
programming language proficiency. 3(3-0) F. 

MA (CSC) 428 Introduction to Numerical Analysis II. Preqs.: MA 405 and program- 
ming language proficiency. 3(3-0) S. 

MA 430 Mathematical Models in the Physical Sciences. Coreqs.: MA 301 or 312, MA 
405. 3(3-0) S. 

MA 432 Mathematical Models in Life Sciences and Social Sciences. Preqs.: MA 301 or 
312, MA 405; Coreq.: MA 421 or ST 371. 3(3-0) F. 

MA 433 History of Mathematics. Preq.: One year of calculus. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MA 501 Advanced Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists I. Preq.: MA 301 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Survey of mathematical methods for engineers and scientists. Ordinary 
differential equations and Green's functions; partial differential equations and separation of 
variables; special functions, Fourier series. Applications to engineering and science are 
stressed. This course cannot be taken for credit by mathematics majors. 

MA 502 Advanced Mathematics for Engineers and Scientists II. Preq.: MA 301 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Determinants and matrices; line and surface integrals, integral 
theorems; complex integrals and residues; distribution functions of probability. This course 
cannot be taken for credit by mathematics majors. 

MA (IE, OR) 505 Mathematical Programming I. 3(3-0) F,Sum. (See industrial 
engineering, page 162.) 

MA 507 Analysis for Secondary Teachers. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) Alt. F.Sum. A 
course designed to update and broaden the secondary teacher's capability and point-of-view 
with respect to topics in analysis. Emphasis is upon the historical development, logical 
refinement, and applications of concepts such as limits, continuity, differentiation, and in- 
tegration. This course may be taken for graduate credit for certificate renewal by secondary 
school teachers. Credit towards a graduate degree may be allowed only for students in 
mathematics education. 

MA 508 Geometry for Secondary Teachers. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) Alt. S.Sum. A 
course designed to study topics in geometry of concern to secondary teachers in their work 
and to provide background and enrichment. Various approaches to the study of geometry are 
investigated, including vector geometry, transformational geometry, and axiomatics. This 
course may be taken for graduate credit and for certificate renewal by secondary school 
teachers. Credit towards a graduate degree may be allowed only for students in mathematics 
education. 

MA 509 Abstract Algebra for Secondary Teachers. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) Alt. 
F.Sum. A course designed to investigate from an advanced viewpoint topics in algebra from 
the high school curriculum. Emphasis is upon the theory of equations, polynomial rings, 
rational functions and elementary number theory. This course may be taken for graduate 
credit for certificate renewal by secondary school teachers. Credit towards a graduate degree 
may be allowed only for students in mathematics education. 



180 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

MA 510 Selected Topics in Mathematics for Secondary Teachers. Preq.: Grad. 
standing. 3(3-0) Alt. S.Sum. A course designed to cover various topics in mathematics of con- 
cern to secondary teachers in their courses or for mathematics. Topics will be selected from 
areas such as mathematics of finance, probability, statistics, linear programming and theory 
of games, intuitive topology, recreational math, computers, and applications of 
mathematics. This course may be taken for graduate credit for certification renewal by 
secondary school teachers. Credit towards a graduate degree may be allowed only by stu- 
dents in mathematics education. 

MA 511 Advanced Calculus I. Preq.: MA 301 or 312. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. Fundamental 
theorems on continuous functions; convergence theory of sequences, series and integrals; the 
Riemann integral. 

MA 512 Advanced Calculus II. Preq.: MA 301 or 312. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. General theorems 
of partial differentiation; implicit function theorems; vector calculus in 3-space; line and sur- 
face integrals; classical integral theorems. 

MA 513 Introduction to Complex Variables. Preq.: MA 511 or 425. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. 
Operations with complex numbers, derivatives, analytic functions, integrals, definitions and 
properties of elementary functions, multivalued functions, power series, residue theory and 
applications, conformal mapping. 

MA 514 Methods of Applied Mathematics. Preq.: MA 511 or 425. 3(3-0) S.Sum. Introduc- 
tion to integral equations, the calculus of variations and difference equations. 

MA 515 Linear Functional Analysis I. Preq.: MA 426. 3(3-0) F. Metric spaces; Lebesgue 
measure and integration; V and l p spaces; Riesz-Fischer and Riesz representation theorems; 
normed linear spaces and Hilbert spaces. 

MA 516 Linear Functional Analysis II. Preq.: MA 515. 3(3-0) S. Basic theorems in 
Banach spaces, dual spaces, weak topologies; basic theorems in Hilbert spaces, and detailed 
theory of linear operators on Hilbert spaces; spectral theorem for self-adjoint completely 
continuous linear operators. 

MA 517 Introduction to Topology. Preq.: MA 426. 3(3-0) F. Sets and functions, metric 
spaces, topological spaces, compactness, separation, connectedness. 

MA 518 Calculus on Manifolds. Preq.: MA 426. 3(3-0) S. Calculus of several variables 
from a modern viewpoint. Differential and integral calculus of several variables, vector func- 
tions, integration on manifolds, Stokes' and Green's theorems, vector analysis. 

MA 520 Linear Algebra. Preq.: MA 405. 3(3-0) F. Vector spaces, linear mappings and 
matrices, determinants, inner product spaces, bilinear and quadratic forms, canonical forms, 
spwtral theorem. 

MA 521 Fundamentals of Modern Algebra. Preqs.: MA 403 and 520. 3(3-0) S. Groups, 
normal subgroups, quotient groups, Cayley's theorem, Sylow's theorem. Rings, ideals and 
quotient rings, polynomial rings. Fields, extension fields, elements of Galois theory. 

MA 523 Topics in Applied Mathematics. Coreqs.: MA 515, 520. 3(3-0) F. Formulation of 
scientific problems in mathematical terms, interpretation and evaluation of the 
mathematical analysis of the resulting models. The course will discuss problems in 
behavioral and biological sciences as well as problems in mechanics of discrete and con- 
tinuous systems. Some discussion of optimization and the calculus of variations. 

MA 524 Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences I. Preqs.: MA 405, 512. 3(3-0) 
F. Green's functions and two-point boundary value problems; elementary theory of distribu- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 181 

tions; generalized Green's functions. Finite and infinite dimensional inner product spaces; 
Hilbert spaces; completely continuous operators; integral equations; the Fredholm alter- 
native; eigenfunction expansions; applications to potential theory. Nonsingular and singular 
Sturm-Liouville problems; Weil's theorem. 

MA 525 Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences II. Preq.: MA 524. 3(3-0) S. 
Distribution theory in n-space; Fourier transforms; partial differential equations, 
generalized solutions, fundamental solutions, Cauchy problem, wave and heat equations, 
well-set problems. Laplace's equation, the Dirichlet and Neumann problems, integral equa- 
tions of potential theory, Green's functions, eigenfunction expansions. 

MA (CSC) 529 Numerical Analysis I. Preqs.: MA 511 or equivalent, MA 405. 3(3-0) F. 
This course is designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students who wish to learn 
the theory of numerical analysis of systems of linear equations, solutions to nonlinear equa- 
tions, interpolation theory, and divided differences. Understanding of the theory behind the 
various techniques and their error estimates will be stressed. Illustrations of the use and 
limitations of these methods on the computer will be included. 

MA (CSC) 530 Numerical Analysis II. Preq.: MA (CSC) 529. 3(3-0) S. This course is a 
continuation of CSC (MA) 529. Topics to be covered are numerical integration, numerical 
solutions of ordinary differential equations, and numerical solutions of partial differential 
equations. 

MA 532 Theory of Ordinary Differential Equations. Preqs.: MA 301 or 312, 405, advan- 
ced calculus. 3(3-0) S. Existence and uniqueness theorems, systems of linear equations, fun- 
damental matrices, matrix exponential, series solutions, regular singular point; plane 
autonomous systems, stability theory. 

MA 534 Introduction to Partial Differential Equations. Preqs.: MA 425 or MA 511, MA 
301 or MA 312. 3(3-0) F. Theory of characteristics and classification of second order equa- 
tions, existence, uniqueness and representation of solutions for the wave equation, Dirichlet 
and Neumann boundary-value problems for the Laplace equation, potential theory in two 
and higher dimensional domains, mean-value theorem and the maximum principle. Green's 
identities, initial boundary-value problems of heat equation and wave equation. Maximum 
principle of parabolic equation, method of eigenfunction expansions, Fourier series and 
Fourier transforms. 

MA (CSC) 536 Theory of Sequential Machines. Preq.: CSC 412 or grad. standing. 3(3-0) 
F. Sequential machine identification experiments. Finite-Memory machines. Special classes 
of machines. Decomposition of sequential machines. Linear sequential machines. Sequential 
relations of finite-state machines. 

MA (CSC) 537 Theory of Computability. Preq.: CSC 412 or grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. The 
concept of effective computability. Turing Machines. Primitive recursive functions. The u 
operator, ^-recursive functions. Godel numbering. Equivalence of Turing Machines and u- 
recursion. Undecidable predicates. Universal Turing Machines. Other formulations of the 
concept of effective computability. 

MA (ST) 541 Theory of Probability I. Preq.: MA 425 or 511. 3(3-0) F.Sum. Axioms, com- 
binatorial analysis, conditional probability, independence, random variables, expectation, 
special discrete and continuous distributions, probability and moment generating functions, 
central limit theorem, laws of large numbers, branching processes, recurrent events, random 
walk. 

MA (ST) 542 Introduction to Stochastic Processes. 3(3-0) S. (See statistics, page 247.) 



182 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

MA 545 Set Theory and Foundations of Mathematics. Preq.: MA 403. 3(3-0) S. Logic and 
the axiomatic approach, the Zermelo-Fraenkel axioms and other systems, algebra of sets and 
order relations, equivalents of the Axiom of Choice, one-to-one correspondences, cardinal and 
ordinal numbers, the Continuum Hypothesis. 

MA (PY) 555 Mathematical Introduction to Celestial Mechanics. Preq.: One year of 
advanced calculus. 3(3-0) F. Central orbits, N-body problem, 3-body problem, Hamilton- 
Jacobi theory, perturbation theory, applications to motion of celestial bodies. 

MA (PY) 556 Orbital Mechanics. Preqs.: MA 301, 405, knowledge of elementary 
mechanics and computer programming. 3(3-0) S. Keplerian motion, iterative solutions, 
numerical integration, differential corrections and space navigation, elements of probability, 
least squares, sequential estimation, Kalman filter. 

MA (BMA, ST) 571 Biomathematics I. 3(3-0) F. (See biomathematics, page 67.) 

MA (BMA, ST) 572 Biomathematics II. 3(3-0) S. (See biomathematics, page 67.) 

MA 581 Special Topics. Preq.: Consent of department. 1-6 F,S. 

MA (CSC) 582 Special Topics in Numerical Solution of Linear Algebraic Equations. 

Preqs.: MA 405 or equivalent and a knowledge of computer programming. 3(3-0) S. A 
mathematical and numerical investigation of direct, iterative and semiterative methods for 
the solution of linear systems. Methods for the calculation of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of 
matrices. 

MA (CSC) 583 Special Topics in the Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential 
Equations. Preq.: Knowledge to the level of CSC 427. 3(3-0) S. Numerical methods for initial 
value problems including predictor-corrector, Runge-Kutta, hybrid and extrapolation 
methods; stiff systems; shooting methods for two-point boundary value problems; weak, ab- 
solute and relative stability results. 

MA (CSC) 584 Special Topics in the Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equa- 
tions. Preq.: Knowledge to the level of CSC 427, 428. 3(3-0) F. Numerical methods for the 
solutions of parabolic, elliptic, and hyperbolic partial differential equations including 
stability and convergence results. 

MA (CSC OR) 585 Graph Theory. 3(3-0) F. (See computer science, page 87.) 

MA (IE, OR) 586 Network Flows. 3(3-0) S. (See industrial engineering, page 162.) 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MA 600 Advanced Differential Equations I. Preqs.: MA 513, 518, 520. 3(3-0) F (Alt. 
years). Analytical theory of ordinary differential equations, stability theory, perturbations, 
asymptotic behavior, nonlinear oscillations. 

MA 601 Advanced Differential Equations II. Preq.: MA 600. 3(3-0) S (Alt. years). 
Qualitative theory of ordinary differential equations, general properties of dynamical 
systems, limit sets, integral invariants, global theory. 

MA 602 Partial Differential Equations I. Preqs.: MA 426, 520, 532 or 600. 3(3-0) F (Alt. 
years). First order equations, initial value problems; theory of characteristics; existence and 
uniqueness theorems; hyperbolic equations. 

MA 603 Partial Differential Equations II. Preq.: MA 602. 3(3-0) S (Alt. years). Elliptic 
and parabolic equations; approximation methods; generalized solutions. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 183 

MA 604 Topology. Preqs.: MA 515, 520. 3(3-0) S. Topological spaces: separation axioms, 
compactness, connectedness, local topological properties; continuous mappings, and con- 
vergence; product and quotient spaces; compactification; homotopy equivalence of mappings, 
fundamental groups, covering spaces, universal coverings, deck transformations. 

MA 605 Homology and Manifolds. Preq.: MA 604. 3(3-0) F. Homology; either simplicial or 
singular theory, excision theorem, homotopy theorem, Mayer-Vietoris theorem and com- 
putation of groups, topology and geometry of differentiable manifolds, vector fields, Lie 
derivations, and differential equations; smooth partitions of unity, integration, differential 
forms and Stokes' theorem; the DeRham cohomology and the DeRham theorem. 

MA (ST, OR) 606 Mathematical Programming II. 3(3-0) S. (See statistics, page 247.) 

MA 611 Analytic Function Theory I. Preq.: MA 426. 3(3-0) F. A rigorous introduction to 
the theory of functions of a complex variable. The complex plane, functions, Mobius transfor- 
mations, the exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, infinite series, 
integration in the complex plane, Cauchy's theorem and its consequences. 

MA 612 Analytic Function Theory II. Preq.: MA 611. 3(3-0) S. A continuation of MA 611. 
Taylor and Laurent series, the residue theorem, the argument principle, harmonic functions 
and the Dirichlet problem, analytic continuation and the monodromy theorem, entire and 
meromorphic functions, the Weierstrass product representation and the Mittag-Leffler par- 
tial fraction representation, special functions, conformal mapping and the Picard theorem. 

MA 613 Techniques of Complex Analysis. Preq.: MA 513 or 611. 3(3-0) S. A. course deal- 
ing with the applications of complex analysis to mathematical problems in physical science 
in the setting of the potential equation and other partial differential equations: contour in- 
tegrals, special functions of mathematical physics from the line integral point of view, solu- 
tion of problems in potential theory, asymptotic methods including WKB, and Wiener-Hopf 
techniques. 

MA (OR) 614. Integer Programming. 3(3-0) Alt. Yr. (See operations research, page 203.) 

MA 615 Theory of Functions of a Real Variable. Preq.: MA 516. 3(3-0) S. Real functions, 
semicontinuity, upper and lower limits, sequences; Lebesgue measure and integration, ab- 
solute continuity and differentiation. 

MA (ST) 617 Measure Theory and Advanced Probability. 3(3-0) F. (See statistics, page 
247.) 

MA (ST) 618 Measure Theory and Advanced Probability. 3(3-0) S. (See statistics, page 
247.) 

MA (ST) 619 Topics in Advanced Probability. 3(3-0) F. (See statistics, page 247.) 

MA 620 Modern Algebra I. Preq.: MA 521. 3(3-0) F. A study of groups, rings and modules. 
Elements of homology. Polynomials, Noetherian rings, Algebraic extensions, Galois theory. 

MA 621 Modern Algebra II. Preq.: MA 620. 3(3-0) S (Alt. years). A study of linear maps, 
bilinear forms, representations, multilinear products, semisimplicity and the representation 
of finite groups. 

MA 622 Linear Transformations and Matrix Theory. Preq.: MA 405. 3(3-0) F.Sum. Vec- 
tor spaces, linear transformation and matrices, minimal polynomials, elementary divisors, 
canonical forms, quadratic forms, functions of matrices. 



184 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

MA 623 Theory of Matrices and Applications. Preq.: MA 520 or 622. 3(3-0) S. 
Generalized inverses, matrix equations, variational methods for eigenvalues, matrix norms, 
perturbation of linear systems, computational methods, applications to differential equa- 
tions, Markov chains. 

MA 626 Algebraic Topology. Preq.: MA 605. 3(3-0) S (Alt. years). Simplicial and singular 
homology and cohomology, the Eilenberg-Steenrod axioms, duality, cohomology operations; 
higher homotopy groups, Hurewicz homomorphisms. 

MA 628 General Topology. Preq.: MA 604. 3(3-0) F (Alt. years). Comparisons of topologies 
on function spaces; Ascoli theorems; Stone-Weierstrass theorems; uniform spaces and com- 
pletions; paracompactness and partitions of unity; an introduction to a special topic such as 
topological vector spaces or topological groups. 

MA (OR) 629 Vector Space Methods in System Optimization. 3(3-0) F. (See operations 
research, page 203.) 

MA 632 Operational Mathematics I. Preq.: MA 513 or 611. 3(3-0) F. Laplace transforms 
with theory and application to ordinary and partial differential equations arising from 
problems in engineering and physics. 

MA 633 Operational Mathematics II. Preq.: MA 632. 3(3-0) S. Extended development of 
the Laplace and Fourier transforms and their application to the solution of ordinary and par- 
tial differential equations, integral equations and difference equations; Z-transforms, other 
infinite and finite transforms and their applications. 

MA 634 Theory of Distributions. Preq.: MA 632 or CI. 3(3-0) F (Alt. years). Basic defini- 
tions and properties of testing functions and distributions in one or more variables, con- 
vergence and calculus of distributions, test functions of rapid descent and distributions of 
slow growth, convolution, Fourier transforms, applications in the area of differential and 
difference equations, etc. 

MA (CSC) 635 Functional Analysis and Numerical Analysis. Preqs.: MA 516, MA 
(CSC) 530. 3(3-0) S. This course generalizes on the basic procedures of classical numerical 
analysis by the application of the abstractions of functional analysis. The course will begin 
with a brief review of functional analysis. Then the applications of functional analysis to the 
solution of numerical problems in the area of optimization, integral and differential equa- 
tions, systems of linear and nonlinear equations, and functional approximation will be 
studied. 

MA 637 Differentiable Manifolds. Preqs.: MA 405, 521; Coreq.: MA 604. 3(3-0) F. An in- 
troduction to the topology and geometry of differentiable manifolds, multilinear algebra, ex- 
terior differential forms, differentiable manifolds, theory of connexions, Riemannian 
manifolds. 

MA 641 Calculus of Variations and Theory of Optimal Control I. Preqs.: MA 512 or 426, 
MA 532. 3(3-0) F (Alt. years). Normed linear function spaces and Frechet differential, theory 
of the first variation, theory of fields and Weierstrass' excess function, Hamilton-Jacobi 
theory and dynamic programming, terminal control problems and the maximum principle. 

MA 642 Calculus of Variations and Theory of Optimal Control II. Preq.: MA 641. 3(3-0) 
S (Alt. years). The homogeneous problem, the general control problem of Mayer, 
isoperimetric problems, theory of the second variation, existence of extrema, direct methods 
of the calculus of variations. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 185 

MA 647 Functional Analysis I. Preq.: MA 516. 3(3-0) F (Alt. years). Banach spaces; linear 
functionals; linear operators, uniform boundedness, open mapping and closed graph 
theorems; dual spaces; weak topologies. 

MA 648 Functional Analysis II. Preq.: MA 647. 3(3-0) S (Alt. years). Advanced topics in 
functional analysis such as linear topological spaces; Banach algebra, spectral theory and 
abstract measure theory and integration. 

MA 661 Differential Geometry and Tensor Analysis I. Preq.: MA 426 or 512. 3(3-0) F 
(Alt. years). Concepts of classical and modern differential geometry presented from the point 
of view of tensor analysis and differential forms. Topics to include: theory of curves, tensor 
analysis and differential forms, intrinsic and extrinsic geometry of surfaces, Riemannian 
geometry. 

MA 662 Differential Geometry and Tensor Analysis II. Preq.: MA 661. 3(3-0) S (Alt. 
years). Continuation of MA 661. 

MA 681 Special Topics in Real Analysis. 1-6. 

MA 682 Special Topics in Complex Analysis. 1-6. 

MA 683 Special Topics in Algebra. 1-6. 

MA 684 Special Topics in Combinatorial Analysis. 1-6. 

MA 685 Special Topics in Numerical Analysis. 1-6. 

MA 686 Special Topics in Topology. 1-6. 

MA 687 Special Topics in Geometry. 1-6. 

MA 688 Special Topics in Differential Equations. 1-6. 

MA 689 Special Topics in Applied Mathematics. 1-6. 

The subject matter in the special topics courses varies from year to year. The 
topics and instructors are announced well in advance by the department. 

MA (IE, OR) 692 Special Topics in Mathematical Programming. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. (See 
industrial engineering, page 162.) 

MA 699 Research. Credits Arranged. Individual research in mathematics. 



Mathematics and Science Education 

For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see mathematics 
and science education under education, page 105. 



186 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor C. F. Zorowski, Head 

Professor J. C. Williams III, Associate Head 

Professor F. R. DeJarnette, Graduate Administrator 

Professors: J. A. Bailey, M. H. Clayton, J. A. Edwards, B. H. Garcia, W. C. Griffith, 
F. J. Hale, F. D. Hart, H. A. Hassan, T. H. Hodgson, R. B. Knight, J. C. Mulligan, 
M. N. Ozisik, J. N. Perkins, L. H. Royster, F. 0. Smetana, F. Y. Sorrell, J. K. 
Whitfield, J. Woodburn; Professor Emeritus: J. S. Doolittle; Adjunct Professors: 
R. F. Barrett, J. J. Murray, E. A. Saibel; Associate Professors: E. M. Afify, J. R. 
Bailey, H. M. Eckerlin, C. J. Maday, C. J. Moore, W. F. Reiter; Adjunct Associate 
Professors: E. S. Armstrong Jr., R. E. Singleton; Assistant Professors: J. A. 
Daggerhart, A. C. Eberhardt, T. H. Pierce; Adjunct Assistant Professors: G. Y. 
Anderson, F. 0. Carta, D. P. Colvin, Peter B. Corson, J. R. Yow 

The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering offers graduate 
study leading to the Master of Mechanical Engineering, Master of Science and Doc- 
tor of Philosophy degrees. Entrance to the various departmental programs is based 
upon a pertinent, accredited baccalaureate degree. 

Graduate study and research are available in six areas: (1) in the thermal 
sciences including classical and statistical thermodynamics, transport phenomena, 
energy conservation and conversion, alternative energy sources, heat and mass 
transfer, and thermal pollution; (2) in acoustical technology including acoustic 
radiation, industrial and community noise control, transportation noise, and hear- 
ing conservation; (3) in gas dynamics including subsonic, transonic, supersonic, and 
hypersonic aerodynamics, rarefied gasdynamics, plasmagasdynamics, combustion, 
and dynamics of viscous fluids; (4) in the mechanical sciences including machine 
vibrations, mechanical transients, materials processing, photoelasticity and ex- 
perimental stress analysis, transportation systems and vehicle safety, and air 
pollution control; (5) in the aerospace sciences including flight vehicle design, iner- 
tial navigation, and all aspects of aerospace propulsion; and (6) in mechanical 
design including practical team effort experience in mechanical device and process 
design encompassing problem definition, information collection, preliminary and 
detailed design, performance evaluation, and redesign. 

Extensive laboratory facilities are available in most of the above areas. These in- 
clude subsonic, transonic, supersonic and hypersonic wind tunnels; vacuum 
facilities; extensive vibration and acoustic laboratories including anechoic cham- 
bers, a large reverberation room, a machinery noise laboratory, and field test and 
analysis instrumentation; a fiber and composite mechanics laboratory; a materials 
processing laboratory; an experimental stress analysis and photoelasticity 
laboratory; a particulate collection and filtration laboratory; automotive perfor- 
mance and emission control laboratory; a spectrophotometry laboratory; a solar 
energy storage laboratory; and a heat transfer laboratory. These and other ex- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 187 

perimental facilities coupled with the availability of an IBM Model 370/165 com- 
puter provide graduate students with outstanding research tools. 

The objective of the department is to provide graduate education both in rigorous 
experimental and theoretical research training and practitioner-oriented engineer- 
ing design involving mission directed problem solving. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 
MAE 401 Energy Conversion. Preq.: MAE 302. 3(3-0) F,S. 

MAE 402 Heat and Mass Transfer. Preqs.: MAE 302. MA 301. 3(3-0) F,S. 

MAE 403 Air Conditioning. Preq.: MAE 302. 3(3-0) F. 

MAE 404 Refrigeration. Preq.: MAE 302. 3(3-0) S. 

MAE 405 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory III. Preq.: MAE 306. 1(0-3) F. 

MAE 407 Steam and Gas Turbines. Preq.: MAE 302, ESM 303, or MAE 355. 3(3-0) S. 

MAE 408 Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals. Preq.: MAE 302. 3(3-0) F. 

MAE 409 Particulate Control in Industrial Atmospheric Pollution. Preq.: MAE 301 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) F. 

MAE 411 Machine Component Design. Preqs.: MAE 315, 316. 3(3-0) F. 

MAE 415 Mechanical Engineering Analysis. Preqs.: MAE 302, 315, 316, EE 331. 3(3-0) F. 

MAE 416 Mechanical Engineering Design. Preq.: MAE 415. 4(3-2) S. 

MAE 422 Direct Energy Conversion. Preq.: MAE 301, EE 202 or 332. 3(3-0) S. 

MAE 431 Thermodynamics of Fluid Flow. Preqs.: MAE 301, MA 301, ESM 303. 3(3-0) S. 

MAE 435 Principles of Automatic Control. Preq.: MA 301. 3(3-0) F,S. 

MAE 442 Automotive Engineering. Preq.: Sr. in Engineering. 3(3-0) S. 

MAE 452 Aerodynamics of V/STOL Vehicles. Preq.: MAE 355. 3(3-0) F. 

MAE 455 Boundary Layer Theory. Preq.: MAE 355. 3(3-0) F. 

MAE 462 Flight Vehicle Stability and Control. Preqs.: MAE 261, 435. 3(3-0) F. 

MAE 465 Propulsion II. Preq.: MAE 365. 4(3-3) F. 

MAE (MAS) 471 Undersea Vehicle Design. Preq.: MAE 355 or ESM 303. 3(3-0) F,S. 

MAE 472 Aerospace Vehicle Structures II. Preq.: MAE 371. 4(3-3) S. 

MAE 478 Aerospace Vehicle Design I. Preqs.: MAE 356, 472; Coreqs.: MAE 462, 465. 2(2- 
0). F. 

MAE 479 Aerospace Vehicle Design II. Preq.: MAE 478. 3(1-6) S. 



188 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MAE 501 Advanced Engineering Thermodynamics. Preqs.: MAE 302; MA 401 or MA 
511. 3(3-0) F. Thermodynamics of a general reactive system; conservation of energy and the 
principles of increase of entropy; the fundamental relation of thermodynamics; Legendre 
transformations; equilibrium and stability criteria in different representation; general rela- 
tions; chemical thermodynamics; multi-reaction system; ionization; irreversible ther- 
modynamics; the Onsager relation; applications to thermoelectric, thermomagnetic and dif- 
fusional processes. 

MAE 502 Advanced Energy Systems. Preq.: MAE 401. 3(3-0) F. An engineering examina- 
tion of energy sources, both conventional and proposed. Review of existing energy conversion 
systems and a critical examination of advanced systems, such as magnetohydrodynamics, 
fuel cells, solar, geothermal, wind, tides, thermal gradients in oceans and the hydrogen 
economy. 

MAE 503 Advanced Power Plants. Preq.: MAE 401. 3(3-0) F. A critical analysis of the 
energy balance of thermal power plants, thermodynamics and economic evaluation of alter- 
nate schemes of development; study of recent development in the production of power. 

MAE 504 Fluid Dynamics of Combustion I. Preqs.: MAE 301, MAE 355 or ESM 303. 3(3- 
0) F. Gas-phase thermochemistry including chemical equilibrium and introductory chemical 
kinetics. Homogeneous reaction phenomena. Subsonic and supersonic combustion waves in 
premixed reactants (deflagration and detonation). Effects of turbulence. Introduction to dif- 
fusion flame theory. 

MAE 505 Heat Transfer Theory and Applications. Preq.: MAE 402 or equivalent. 3(3-0) 
F. Development of basic equations for steady and transient heat and mass transfer 
processes. Emphasis is placed on the application of the basic equations to engineering 
problems in the areas of conduction, convection, mass transfer and thermal radiation. 

MAE 506 Advanced Automotive Energy Systems. Preq.: MAE 408. 3(3-0) S. A critical 
study of the various cycles and energy systems for automotive transportation is carried out. 
The feasibility of automotive Rankine cycle power plants, Sterling engines, gas turbines and 
hydrogen-air fueled e 'nes is discussed. Means of improving the efficiency and exhaust 
emissions of internal combustion engines and the use of alternative fuel sources are con- 
sidered. 

MAE 510 Effects of Noise and Vibration on Man. Preqs.: Sr. standing in Engineering, 
MA 301. 3(3-0) Alt. F. Study of the effects of noise and vibration on man. Topics covered in- 
clude acoustic and vibration fundamentals, auditory and non-auditory response to noise, 
subjective response to noise, environment noise, body physical characteristics, effects of 
vibration and shock exposure. 

MAE 513 Vibration of Mechanical and Structural Components. Preq.: MAE 315 or 472; 
Coreq.: MA 511. 3(3-0) F. Modeling of mechanical and structural systems for vibration 
analysis and presentation of exact and approximate solution techniques. Techniques of 
vibration control are presented and experience on the digital computer is provided. 

MAE 514 Industrial Noise Control. Preq.: MAE 315. 3(2-3) S. Provides definition of the 
industrial noise problem, development of analytical problem solving skills, introduction to 
instrumentation, involvement in design project, laboratory demonstrations. 

MAE 517 Instrumentation in Sound and Vibration Engineering. Preq.: EE 331. Coreq.: 
MAE 513. 3(3-0) F. This course is devoted to a presentation of measurement techniques and 
the theory and operation of transducers and amplifiers. An introduction to signal analysis 
techniques such as power spectral density and correlation is also provided. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 189 

MAE 518 Acoustic Radiation I. Preqs.: MAE 301, 356, or ESM 303. 3(3-0) F. An introduc- 
tion to the principles of acoustic radiation from vibrating bodies and their related fields. The 
radiation of simple sources, the propagation of sound waves in confined spaces and transmis- 
sion through different media are considered. 

MAE 519 Theory of Noise in Transportation Systems. Preq.: MAE 550. 3(3-0) S. A study 
of the basic noise generating mechanisms encountered in transportation systems. Coverage 
includes jet noise, propeller noise, helicopter noise, fan and compressor noise, aircraft in- 
duced community noise, surface vehicle noise models and efforts to control noise in transpor- 
tation systems. 

MAE 525 Advanced Flight Vehicle Stability and Control. Preq.: MAE 462. 3(3-0) F. 
Preliminary analysis and design of flight control systems to include autopilots and stability 
augmentation systems. Study of effects of inertial cross-coupling and nonrigid bodies on 
vehicle dynamics. 

MAE 526 Inertial Navigation Analysis and Design. Preq.: MAE 435 or 462. 3(3-0) S. Per- 
formance analysis and engineering design of inertial navigation components, subsystems 
and systems. Development of transfer functions and application of linear system techniques 
to determine stability, transient response and errors of gyroscopes, accelerometers, stable 
platforms and inertial alignment systems. Error analysis and its significance. Preliminary 
analysis and design of typical inertial navigation systems for aircraft and marine vehicles. 

MAE (MAT) 531 Materials Processing by Deformation. Preq.: Six hours of solid 
mechanics and/or materials. 3(3-0) F. The course involves a presentation of the mechanical 
and metallurgical fundamentals of materials processing by deformation. Topics to be dis- 
cussed include: principles of metal working, friction, forging, rolling, extrusion, drawing, 
high energy rate forming, chipless forming techniques, manufacturing system concept in 
production. 

MAE (MAT) 532 Fundamentals of Metal Machining Theory. Preq.: Six hours of solid 
mechanics and/or materials. 3(3-0) S. The course involves a presentation of the mechanical 
and metallurgical fundamentals of metal machining. Topics to be discussed include: 
mechanics of machining, temperatures generated, tool life and tool wear, lubrication, 
grinding process, electrical machining processes, surface integrity, economics, nomenclature 
of cutting tools. 

MAE 533 Finite Element Analysis of Mechanical and Aeronautical Systems I. Preq.: 
MAE 472; Coreq.: MAE 415. 3(3-0) F. Concepts and applications of the finite element method 
for stress and deformation analysis. Explanation and application of a general purpose finite 
element program for stress and deformation analysis of simple structures and load-carrying 
components. 

MAE 534 Finite Element Analysis of Mechanical and Aeronautical Systems II. Preq.: 
MAE 533. 3(3-0) S. This course extends the finite element study, initiated in MAE 533, for 
stress analysis to other fields of interest in mechanical and aerospace engineering. Topics 
considered include vibration and frequency analysis, heat transfer, and potential flow. Two 
topics of advanced stress analysis, thin shells and the bending of plates, are also included. 

MAE 535 Experimental Stress Analysis. Preq.: MAE 316 or 371. 3(2-3) F. Theoretical and 
experimental techniques of strain and stress analysis with emphasis on electrical strain 
gages and instrumentation, brittle coatings, grid methods and an introduction to 
photoelasticity. Laboratory includes an investigation and complete report of a problem 
chosen by the student under the guidance of the instructor. 



190 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

MAE 536 Photoelasticity. Preq.: MAE 316 or 371. 3(2-3) S. Theory and experimental 
techniques of two- and three-dimensional photoelasticity including photoelastic coatings, 
photoplasticity and an application of photoelastic methods to the determination of stress- 
strain distributions in loaded members. Laboratory includes an investigation and complete 
report of a problem chosen by the student under the guidance of the instructor. 

MAE 540 Advanced Air Conditioning Design. Preqs.: MAE 403, 404. 3(3-0) F. The design 
of heating and air-conditioning systems; the preparation of specifications and performance 
tests on heating and air-conditioning equipment. 

MAE 541 Advanced Machine Design I. Preq.: MAE 416. 3(3-0) F. An advanced integrated 
treatment of stress analysis and materials engineering devoted to current rational methods 
of analysis and design applicable to mechanical components. Primary attention placed on the 
determination and prediction of strength, life, and deformation characteristics of machine 
components as dictated by performance requirements. 

MAE (OR) 545 Variational Methods in Optimization Techniques I. 3(3-0) Alt. F,S. (See 

operations research, page 203.) 

MAE 550 Foundations of Fluid Dynamics. Preqs.: MAE 301, MAE 355 or ESM 303. 3(3-0) 
F. Review of basic thermodynamics pertinent to gas dynamics. Detailed development of the 
general equations governing fluid motion in both differential and integral form. Simplifica- 
tion of the equations to those for specialized flow regimes. Similarity parameters. Applica- 
tions to simple problems in various flow regimes. 

MAE 551 Airfoil Theory. Preq.: MAE 355. 3(3-0) S. Development of fundamental 
aerodynamic theory. Emphasis upon mathematical analysis and derivation of equations of 
motion, airfoil theory and comparison with experimental results. Introduction to supersonic 
flow theory. 

MAE 552 Transonic Aerodynamics. Preq.: MAE 356. 3(3-0) S. A detailed study of the 
latest theoretical and experimental findings in transonic aerodynamics, including two- 
dimensional and axisymmetric flows. 

MAE 553 Compressible Fluids. Preq.: MAE 356 or MAE 431 or MAE 550. 3(3-0) Alt. F. 
Equations of motion in supersonic flow. Prandtl-Meyer turns, method of characteristics, 
hodograph plane, supersonic wind tunnels, supersonic airfoil theory and boundary layer 
shock interaction. 

MAE 554 Hypersonic Aerodynamics. Preq.: MAE 356. 3(3-0) F. A detailed study of the 
latest theoretical and experimental findings in hypersonic aerodynamics. 

MAE 555 Aerodynamic Heating. Preq.: MAE 356. 3(3-0) F. A detailed study of the latest 
theoretical and experimental findings of the compressible laminar and turbulent boundary 
layers with special attention to the aerodynamic heating problem. Application of theory in 
the analysis and design of aerospace hardware. 

MAE 556 Mechanics of Ideal Fluids. Preq.: MAE 355 or ESM 303. 3(3-0) S. Fundamental 
principles of fluid dynamics. Mathematical methods of analysis are emphasized. Potential 
flow theory development with introduction to the effects of viscosity and compressibility. 
Two-dimensional and three-dimensional phenomena are considered. 

MAE 557 Dynamics of Internal Fluid Flow. Preq.: MAE 356 or ESM 303. 3(3-0) F. A 
general development of the governing equations of fluid motion with subsequent restriction 
to incompressible flow. Exact and approximate solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 191 

internal laminar flow and elementary boundary layer theory. Applications include 
hydrodynamic lubrication, converging-diverging channel flows, entrance flows and tur- 
bulent internal flow. 

MAE 558 Plasmagasdynamics I. Preqs.: MAE 356, PY 414. 3(3-0) F. Study of basic laws 
governing plasma motion for dense and rarefied plasmas, hydromagnetic shocks, plasma 
waves and instabilities, simple engineering applications. 

MAE 559 Molecular Gas Dynamics I. Preq.: MAE 550. 3(3-0) F. Statistical mechanics as 
applied to the derivation of the equations of gas dynamics from the microscopic viewpoint. 
Collision processes, treatments of viscosity, heat conduction and electrical conductivity. 

MAE (OY, MA) 563 Geophysical Fluid Mechanics. 3(3-0) Alt. F. (See physical 
oceanography, page 209.) 

MAE (EE) 565 Gas Lasers. Preqs.: MAE 356 or equivalent, PY 407. 3(3-0) F. Study of the 
principles, design and potential applications of ion, molecular, chemical and atomic gas 
lasers. 

MAE 570 Theory of Particulate Collection in Air Pollution Control. Preq.: MAE 409 or 
grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. Particulate matter is classified and its properties are described. The 
motion of particles as applied to particulate collection is carefully analyzed. The elements of 
aerodynamic capture of particles are developed and applications in filtration and liquid 
scrubbing are considered. Fundamentals of acoustical, electrostatic and thermal precipita- 
tion are introduced. Sampling techniques and instrumentation are also considered. 

MAE 586 Project Work in Mechanical Engineering. 1-6 F,S. Individual or small group 
investigation of a problem stemming from a mutual student-faculty interest. Emphasis is 
placed on providing a situation for exploiting student curiosity. 

MAE 589 Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. or 
grad. standing. 3(3-0) F,S. Faculty and student discussions of special topics in mechanical 
engineering. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MAE 601 Statistical Thermodynamics. Preq.: MAE 501. 3(3-0) S. Fundamental princi- 
ples of kinetic theory, quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics and irreversible 
phenomena with particular reference to thermodynamics systems and processes. The conclu- 
sions of classical thermodynamics are analyzed and established from the microscopic view- 
point. 

MAE 603 Advanced Direct Energy Conversion. Preq.: MAE 501. 3(3-0) F. An engineer- 
ing study of the modern developments in the field of conversion of heat to power in order to 
meet new technology demands. Thermoelectric, thermomagnetic, thermionic, photovoltaic 
and magneto-hydrodynamic effects and their utilization for energy conversion purposes, 
static and dynamic response, limitations imposed by the first and second laws of ther- 
modynamics. Energy and entropy balances, irreversible sources, inherent losses, cascading, 
design procedures, experimental studies to determine the response and efficiency of various 
systems. 

MAE 604 Fluid Dynamics of Combustion II. Preq.: MAE 504. 3(3-0) S. Advanced theory 
of detonation and deflagration. Ignition criteria. Direct initiation of detonation including 
blast-wave theory. Transition from deflagration to detonation. Combustion wave structun- 
and stability. Liquid droplet and solid particle combustion. 



192 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

MAE 608 Advanced Conductive Heat Transfer. Preq.: MAE 505. 3(3-0) F. A generalized 
treatment of the solution of transient and steady heat conduction in finite and infinite 
regions. Approximate and exact methods of solution of problems involving phase change, 
variable thermal properties and non-linear boundary conditions. Heat conduction in com- 
posite media and in anisotropic solids. 

MAE 609 Advanced Convective Heat Transfer. Preq.: MAE 557. 3(3-0) S. Advanced 
topics in steady and transient, natural and forced convective heat transfer for laminar and 
turbulent flow through conduits and over surfaces. Mass transfer in laminar and turbulent 
flow is also covered. Topics on compressible flow with heat and mass transfer are included. 

MAE 610 Advanced Radiative Heat Transfer. Preq.: MAE 505. 3(3-0) S. A comprehen- 
sive and unified treatment of basic theories; exact and approximate methods of solution of 
radiative heat transfer and the interaction of radiation with conductive and convective 
modes of heat transfer in participating and non-participating media. 

MAE 614 Mechanical Transients and Machine Vibrations. Preq.: MAE 513. 3(3-0) S. 
Forces and motions produced in mechanical systems by periodic transient inputs including 
shock and impact loading. Application to lumped mass and continuous systems including 
plates and shells. 

MAE 615 Nonlinear Vibrations. Preq.: MAE 513. 3(3-0) S. A study of free and forced 
vibrations of non-linear systems with non-linear restoring forces and self-sustained oscilla- 
tions. Various analytical and phase plane methods are developed and used in obtaining ac- 
tual solutions. Emphasis is placed on understanding properties unique to non-linear systems. 

MAE 618 Acoustic Radiation II. Preq.: MAE 518. 3(3-0) S. Advanced treatment of the 
theory of sound generation and transmission. Topics include: techniques for solution of the 
wave equation, radiation from spheres, cylinders and plates, sound propagation in ducts, 
scattering. 

MAE 619 Random Vibration. Preq.: MAE 513. 3(3-0) F. Mathematical description of 
stochastic processes. The stationary and ergodic assumptions and response analysis of 
mechanical systems to random excitation. Simulation of and failure due to random environ- 
ments. 

MAE 623 Mechanics of Machinery. Preqs.: MAE 315, MA 512. 3(3-0) F. Advanced ap- 
plications of dynamics to the design and response analysis of dynamic behavior of machines 
and mechanical devices. Emphasis on developing competence in transforming real problems 
in dynamics into appropriate mathematical models whose analysis permits performance 
predictions of engineering value. 

MAE 640 Advanced Machine Design II. Preqs.: MAE 541 and CI. 3(3-0) S. A continua- 
tion, at the advanced level, of MAE 541, Advanced Machine Design I. 

MAE 642 Mechanical Design Analysis. Preq.: Nine hours of graduate credit in MAE. 
3(3-0) F. Lecture and project activity devoted to development of the ability to apply 
knowledge and experience in performing comprehensive design analysis of complete 
mechanical systems. Areas of interest to include critical problem recognition, system model- 
ing, performance determination, and optimization and reliability evaluation. 

MAE 643 Mechanical Design Synthesis. Preq.: MAE 642. 3(2-2) S. Application of the 
basic philosophy and methodology of the complete design process to advanced mechanical 
system design. Individual and group experience in the conception, synthesis, analysis, op- 
timization and implementation phases of feasibility, preliminary and final design studies; 
provided by means of comprehensive system design projects. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 193 

MAE (OR) 646 Variational Methods in Optimization Techniques II. 3(3-0) Alt. F,S. 
(See operations research, page 203.) 

MAE 654 Dynamics of Real Fluids I. Preq.: MAE 550 or 557. 3(3-0) S. Exact solutions to 
the Navier-Stokes equations. Approximate solutions for low Reynolds numbers. Approx- 
imate solutions for high Reynolds numbers— incompressible boundary layer theory. 
Laminar and turbulent boundary layers in theory and experiment. Flow separation. 

MAE 655 Dynamics of Real Fluids II. Preq.: MAE 654. 3(3-0) F. A continuation of MAE 
654. Compressible laminar and turbulent boundary layers. Laminar and turbulent jets. The 
stability of laminar boundary layers with respect to small disturbances, transition from 
laminar to turbulent flow. 

MAE 656 Turbulence. Preq.: MAE 550. 3(3-0) S. A development of the basic concepts and 
governing equations for turbulence and turbulent field motion. Formulations of the various 
correlation tensors and energy spectra for isotropic and nonisotropic turbulence. An in- 
troduction to turbulent transport processes, "free" turbulence, and "wall" turbulence. 

MAE 658 Plasmagasdynamics II. Preq.: MAE 558. 3(3-0) S. Quantum statistics and 
ionization phenomena. Charged particle interactions. Transport properties in the presence of 
electric and magnetic fields and nonequilibrium ionization. 

MAE 659 Molecular Gas Dynamics II. Preqs.: MAE 559, 601. 3(3-0) S. A continuation of 
MAE 559. Approximate methods of solution to the Boltzmann equation. Modeling of the 
Boltzmann equation. Results obtained by the various methods of analysis. 

MAE 661 Introduction to Rocket Propulsion. Preq.: MAE 501. 3(3-0) F. Review of the ex- 
terior ballistics and performance of rocket-propelled vehicles. Thermodynamics of real gases 
at high temperatures. Nonequilibrium flow in rocket nozzles. 

MAE 662 Chemical Propulsion. Preq.: MAE 661. 3(3-0) S. Depending upon student in- 
terest, this course will cover solid or liquid propellant rockets, and deal with combustion of 
propellants, combustion instabilities and the design and performance of solid or liquid 
propellant engines. 

MAE (OY, MAS) 663 Advanced Geophysical Fluid Mechanics. 3(3-0) Alt. S. (See 
physical oceanography, page 209.) 

MAE (OY, MAS) 664, 665 Perturbation Method in Fluid Mechanics I, II. 3(3-0) F,S. 
(See physical oceanography, page 209.) 

MAE 686 Advanced Topics in Mechanical Engineering. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F,S. 
Faculty and graduate student discussions of advanced topics in contemporary mechanical 
engineering. 

MAE 695 Mechanical Engineering Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Faculty and graduate student 
discussions centered around current research problems and advanced engineering theories. 

MAE 699 Mechanical Engineering Research. Preq.: Grad. standing in mechanical 
engineering, consent of adviser. Credits Arranged. Individual research in the field of 
mechanical engineering. 



194 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Meteorology 

For a list of graduate faculty and departmental information, see Geosciences, 
page 153. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

MY 411 Introductory Meteorology. Preqs.: PY 208 or 212; MA 201 or 212. 3(3-0) F. 

MY 412 Atmospheric Physics. Preq.: MY 411 or CI. 3(3-0) S. 

MY 421 Atmospheric Statics and Thermodynamics. Preqs.: PY 208 or 212; MA 202. 3(3- 
0) F. 

MY 422 Atmospheric Kinematics and Dynamics. Preqs.: PY 208, MA 202; Coreq.: MY 
421 or CI. 3(3-0) S. 

MY 435 Measurements and Data Systems. Preq.: MY 421. 3(2-3) S. 

MY 441 Meteorological Analysis I. Preqs.: MY 422, 435. 3(3-0) F. 

MY 443 Meteorological Laboratory I. Preq.: MY 435; Coreq.: MY 441. 4(0-10) S. 

MY 444 Meteorological Laboratory II. Preq.: MY 443. 4(0-10) S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MY 512 Micrometeorology. Preq.: MY 422. 3(3-0) F. Meteorology of the lowest hundred 
meters of the atmosphere with emphasis on the transport of momentum, heat, water vapor, 
and effluents and their transfer through the earth's surface. Arya 

MY 521 The Upper Atmosphere. Preq.: MY 411 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Meteorological conditions 
in the upper atmosphere from the stratosphere to the ionosphere. Compositions, mean dis- 
tributions and variabilities, and circulation and transport properties in the region. Physical 
theories. Watson 

MY 524 Dynamic Meteorology. Preq.: MY 422. 3(3-0) F. Brief review of the classical and 
physical hydrodynamics; scale analysis of dynamic equations; atmospheric instabilities; 
dynamics of tropical convections; perturbation theory and approximations for atmospheric 
wave motions. Tsui 

MY 525 Numerical Weather Prediction. Preqs.: MY 524, CSC (MA) 427 or equivalent and 
some FORTRAN programming experience. 3(3-0) S. Physical and mathematical basis of 
numerical weather prediction with computer experiments to demonstrate principles and 
techniques. Topics include basic equations and methods of dynamical prediction, scale 
analysis, integral constraints on vorticity and energy, consistent sets of prediction equations, 
filtered equations, finite-difference methods, computational instability, relaxation methods, 
simple barotropic and baroclinic models, NWS operational models. Watson 

MY (MAS) 526 Air-Sea Interaction. Preq.: MY 422 or OY(CE.MAS) 487 or CI. 3(3-0) Alt. 
F,S. Review of basic equations and concepts of turbulent transfer in geophysical flows, air- 
sea interaction processes and their importance to man's activities, theory and observation of 
wind-generated ocean surface waves, turbulent transfers in the planetary boundary layer of 
the marine atmosphere, oceanic mixed layer, development of thermocline and inversion. 

Arya 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 195 

MY 527 Planetary Boundary Layer. Preq.: MY 455 or MY 526 or CI. 3(3-0) Alt. F,S. 
Review of the basic equations and concepts of planetary boundary layers. Study of the 
closure problem and semiempirical theories of turbulence, buoyancy effects on mean flow of 
turbulence, instrumentation and observational platforms for PBL experiments, observed 
characteristics and atmospheric boundary layers, numerical and physical modeling of PBL, 
and its parameterization in large-scale atmospheric circulation models. Arya 

MY 555 Meteorology of the Biosphere. Preqs.: PY 205 or 211; CH 103 or 107; MA 102 or 
112. 3(3-0) F. A course designed for graduate students in the life sciences, presenting the 
physical principles governing the states and processes of the atmosphere in contact with 
earth's surface of land, water, and life. Exchanges of heat, mass, and momentum are 
analyzed for various conditions of the atmosphere and surface, and as a function of season, 
time, and geographic location. Weber 

MY 556 Air Pollution Meteorology. Preq.: MY 555 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. The 
meteorological aspects of air pollution, especially for nonmeteorologists engaged in graduate 
training for work involving air pollution. Arya 

MY 593 Advanced Topics. Preq.: CI. 1-6 F,S. Special topics in meteorology, provided to 
groups or to individuals. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MY 612 Atmospheric Radiative Transfer. Preq.: MY 412. 3(3-0) S. The study of solar and 
terrestrial radiation. Methods of actinometric measurements, radiation absorption in the at- 
mosphere, scattering of radiation, the solar spectrum, infrared radiative transfer and 
methods of determining net radiation. Satellite measurement of radiation and determination 
of atmospheric properties from satellite measurements. Weber 

MY 627 Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion. Preq.: MY 422. 3(3-0) F. Mechanics of 
turbulence in the atmosphere, spectra and scales of atmospheric turbulence, and magnitudes 
of turbulent fluctuations. Theories of diffusion in the atmosphere. Diffusion and transport 
experiments. Processes other than natural turbulence affecting concentration of effluents. 

Arya 

MY 635 Dynamical Analysis of the Atmosphere. Preqs.: MY 441, 443. 3(2-3) F. Theory 
and analysis of circulation and weather systems based on dynamical concepts; structure, 
movement and development of systems; evaluation of theoretical concepts in prognosis and 
forecasting. Saucier 

MY 695 Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) F,S. Presentation of scientific articles and 
special lectures. Each student is required to present or critically review one or more papers. 

Graduate Staff 

MY 699 Research. Preqs.: Grad. standing and consent of advisory committee. Credit 
Arranged. F,S. Graduate research in fulfillment of requirements for a graduate degree. 

Graduate Staff 



196 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Microbiology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. B. Evans, Head 

Professors: W. J. Dobrogosz, G. H. Elkan, P. B. Hamilton, J. J. Perry; Adjunct 
Associate Professor: R. E. Kanich; Assistant Professors: R. E. Johnston, G. H. 
Luginbuhl, Thoyd Melton; Assistant Professor USDA: P. E. Bishop; Adjunct 
Assistant Professor: D. H. King 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 

Professors: F. B. Armstrong, W. E. Kloos, J. G. Lecce, M. L. Speck, A. G. Wollum 
II; Professor Emeritus USDA: J. L. Etchells; Associate Professors: J. J. McNeill, 
D. G. Simmons 

The Department of Microbiology offers programs leading to the Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. These are research oriented programs 
that require a dissertation based on personal research. For students wishing a 
more general education without the thesis requirement, the Master of Life Sciences 
degree is offered with an emphasis in microbiology. 

Applicants should have a bachelor's degree in one of the biological or physical 
sciences including at least one course in microbiology and courses in orga.iic 
chemistry and calculus. Deficiencies may be made up while in graduate school but 
will not be counted as credit toward a graduate degree. 

There are no specific departmental requirements regarding courses of study. 
There is a core of basic courses in microbiology that will be in the programs of most 
graduate students who have not had equivalent courses previously. As many as 
half of the courses in most programs will be basic courses in related areas such as 
biochemistry, chemistry, genetics or toxicology. 

At least one semester of half-time teaching experience is required of all Ph.D. 
candidates. All graduate students are expected to attend and participate in the 
seminar program every semester they are in residence. As a general rule the M.S. 
program requires two full years (including summers) beyond the B.S. level and the 
Ph.D. program requires two or three full years beyond the M.S. level. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

MB 401 General Microbiology. Preqs.: BS 100; CH 223 or CH 220. 4(3-3) F,S. 

MB (FS) 405 Food Microbiology. Preq.: MB 401. 3(2-3)F. 

MB 411 Medical Microbiology. Preq.: MB 401. 4(3-3) S. 

MB 490 Special Studies in Mi -obiology. Preqs.: Three courses in MB and CI. 1-3 

F.S.Sum. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 197 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MB 501 Advanced Microbiology. Preq.: MB 401. 3(3-0) F. A study in some depth of 
microbial structure and function, microbial ecology and characterization of important 
groups of microorganisms. Perry 

MB (FS) 506 Advanced Food Microbiology. 3(1-6) S. (See food science, page 144.) 

MB 514 Microbial Metabolism. Preqs.: MB 401, BCH 351 or BCH 551. 3(3-0) S. A study of 
the physiology and metabolism of microorganisms and their regulatory mechanisms. 

Dobrogosz 

MB (SSC) 532 Soil Microbiology. 4(3-3) S. (See soil science, page 244.) 

MB 551 Immunology I. Preq.: MB 401. 3(2-2) F. A concise study of the basic concepts and 
principles in immunology and serology. Primary emphasis will be on humoral immunity in- 
volving soluble blood and lymph components important in the resistance of the host to 
disease. Lecce 

MB (PO, PHY, VET) 552 Immunobiology. 3(3-0) S. (See poultry science, page 226.) 

MB (ZO) 555 Protozoology. 4(2-6) S. (See zoology, page 271.) 

MB (BCH, GN) 561 Biochemical and Microbial Genetics. 3(3-0) S. (See biochemistry, 
page 61.) 

MB (BAE, CE) 570 Sanitary Microbiology. 3(2-3) S. (See civil engineering, page 80.) 

MB 571 Virology. Preqs.: BCH 551, MB 401. 3(3-0) F. An introduction to the fundamental 
aspects of virus-cell interactions. These include virus attachment and penetration, in- 
tracellular virus replication, metabolic changes occurring in cells as a result of virus infec- 
tion and virus-induced cellular transformations. Johnston 

MB (BO) 574 Phycology. 3(1-4) S. (See botany, page 68.) 

MB (BO, PP) 575 The Fungi. 3(3-0) F. (See botany, page 68.) 

MB (BO, PP) 576 The Fungi— Lab. 1(0-3) F. (See botany, page 68.) 

MB 590 Topical Problems. Preqs.: Grad. standing, CI. Credits Arranged. F.S. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MB (SSC) 632 Ecology and Functions of Soil Microorganisms. 3(3-0) S. (See soil 
science, page 244.) 

MB 690 Microbiology Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Graduate Staff 

MB 692 Special Problems in Microbiology. Credits Arranged. F.S. Graduate Staff 

MB 699 Microbiology Research. Credits Arranged. F,S. Graduate Staff 



198 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Nuclear Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor T. S. Elleman, Head 

Professors: R. P. Gardner, R. L. Murray, R. F. Saxe, K. Verghese— Gradua te Ad- 
ministrator, L. R. Zumwalt; Associate Professors: J . R. Bohannon Jr., C. E. 
Siewert, E. Stam 

The discipline of nuclear engineering is dedicated to the development of nuclear 
processes for energy needs and to the application of radiation for the benefit of 
society. The Department of Nuclear Engineering offers graduate study oriented 
toward careers related to the problems of energy and of the environment, and 
provides courses and research leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees. 

Topics of investigation include nuclear reactor safety, environmental aspects of 
nuclear energy, radiation detection and measurement, nuclear reactor theory, 
analysis and design, properties of nuclear materials, fusion, radiation effects, reac- 
tor kinetics, and applications of radioisotopes and radiation in industry, medicine 
and science. 

The one-megawatt PULSTAR reactor, which became operational in 1973, is 
similar in design, type of fuel, and performance to modern power reactors. It is 
used for teaching, research and service in behalf of the University. Also available 
for student use in research are a 20,000 curie cobalt-60 gamma irradiation source, 
an IBM System 370 Model 165 computer, and a number of well-equipped 
laboratories. 

Bachelor's degree graduates in any of the fields of engineering or physical 
sciences may be qualified for successful advanced study in nuclear engineering. 
Prior experience or course work in nuclear physics, differential equations and basic 
reactor analysis is helpful, but may be gained during the first semester of graduate 
study. 

Opportunities are available for graduate co-op work with utility companies and 
reactor manufacturers in the Raleigh area, providing a valuable combination of 
financial support and learning in the classroom, the research laboratory and on the 
job. Teaching and research assistantships are available for qualified applicants. 
Part-time work is available for graduate students with reactor operations and the 
activation analysis and radioisotope production laboratories. 

Thirty semester hours, including four for research on a thesis, are required for 
the M.S. degree. Students may also work directly toward a Ph.D. degree. Inter- 
disciplinary programs with other departments in the School of Engineering are 
available. 

The advent of competitive nuclear power and the ever-increasing need for 
reliable clean energy has created a strong demand for nuclear engineers to par- 
ticipate in all phases of the nuclear power field— environmental studies, siting, 
design, construction, testing, operation, licensing, and evaluation. Graduates of the 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 199 

department find positions in industry, government, and educational institutions, 
working with reactors in the several categories— light water, gas-cooled, fast 
breeder and fusion. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUTE COURSES 

NE 401 Reactor Analysis and Design. Preq.: NE 302 or NE 419. 4(3-2) S. 

NE 402 Reactor Engineering. Coreq.: NE 302 or NE 419. 4(3-2) F. 

NE 403 Nuclear Engineering Design Projects. Preq.: NE 402. 3(2-3) S. 

NE 404 Radiological, Reactor, and Environmental Safety. Preq.: NE 302 or NE 419. 3(3- 
0) F. 

NE 405 Reactor Systems. Preq.: NE 402. 3(3-0) S. 

NE 412 Nuclear Fuel Cycles. Preq.: NE 302. 3(3-0) S. 

NE 414 Nuclear Power Plant Instrumentation. Preqs.: NE students— EE 331, 332; EE 
students— NE 419. 3(3-0) S. 

NE 419 Introduction to Nuclear Engineering. Preq.: PY 202 or PY 208. 3(3-0) F,S. 

NE 491, 492 Nuclear Engineering Topics I, II. Preq.: CI. 1-4 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

NE 501 Radiation and Reactor Fundamentals. Preq.: MA 401; Coreq.: NE 419. 4(3-3 1 F 
An introduction to fundamentals of reactor physics, nuclear radiation, and radiation interac- 
tions. Topics include radiation interaction with matter, radiation detection, neutron and 
reactor physics, neutron slowing down, one-group and two-group criticality for bare and 
reflected reactors, and radiation shielding. Laboratory experiments in radiation detection 
and attenuation are included. Stam 

NE 502 Nuclear Engineering Analysis. Preqs.: NE 401 or NE 501, MA 401. 3(3-0) S. 
Provides a unified view of the basic equations and techniques of radiation transport calcula- 
tions. The course introduces the common analytical and numerical solution techniques used 
in nuclear engineering and develops solutions for typical problems in the nuclear field. The 
course is intended to provide the background in analysis needed for more advanced studies in 
nuclear engineering. Dunn, Gardner, Murray 

NE 503 Reactor Analysis. Preqs.: NE 401 or NE 501; MA 401. 2(2-0) F. Provides the basic 
theory of neutron motion and methods for finding neutron flux distributions in a nuclear 
reactor. Neutron slowing, reasonance absorption, thermalization, and diffusion in reactor 
components are emphasized. With the knowledge of the contents of the course students can 
read the literature, perform analysis, and do calculations. Murray 

NE 504 Reactor Heat Transfer. Preq.: NE 501. 2(2-0) S. Considers heat generation and 
transfer in nuclear power reactors. Topics include reactor heat generation, steady-state heat 
flow in fuel elements, unsteady-state heat transfer, convective heat transfer coefficients for 
turbulent flow, boiling and two-phase flow, reactor system descriptions and reactor 
economics. verghese 



200 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

NE 505 Reactor Dynamics and Control. Preq.: NE 401 or NE 501. 2(2-0) F. Considers the 
time dependent behavior of nuclear reactors and their control. Topics include time depen- 
dent, one-speed diffusion equation, point reactor kinetics, solutions for ramp insertions of 
reactivity, temperatures and void coefficients, feedback in power excursions, feedback 
analysis reactor transfer functions, determination of transfer functions, digital reactivity 
meters, and space dependent reactor dynamics. Saxe 

NE 506 Radioisotopes Measurement Applications, Preqs.: MA 401, NE 501. 2(2-0) S. In- 
troduces the student to measurement application using radioisotopes. In addition to survey- 
ing all tracer and gauging applications and radiography, four major specific applications in 
gauging and tracing are treated in detail. Gardner 

NE 507 Radiation Effects. Preq.: NE 401 or NE 501. 2(2-0) F. Introduces the student to 
radiation effects on organic materials, metals, and inorganic solids with particular emphasis 
on nuclear reactor fuels. Applications of radiation effects such as sterilization and 
polymerization are discussed as well as the implications of radiation damage to reactor 
materials. Zumwalt 

NE 508 Radiation Safety. Preq.: NE 501. 2(2-0) S. Presents the basic concepts of health 
physics, biological effects of radiation, and calculation of radiation exposure. Methods of 
dose reduction are considered with particular emphasis on radiation shielding. Topics in- 
clude: radiation units, allowable radiation exposures, dose calculations — external and inter- 
nal, radiation dosimetry, reactor radiation sources and shielding. Elleman 

NE 510 Nuclear Design Calculations. Preq.: NE 401 or NE 501. 3(3-0) S. Application of 
the digital computer to problems in nuclear engineering. Available nuclear engineering com- 
puter modules are studied and exercised. Systems and programs used by industry for power 
reactor design and operation are described. A review of relevant numerical methods 
facilitates computer program development by the students. Students do literature studies, a 
term project, and give oral reports. Murray 

NE (PY) 511 Nuclear Physics for Engineers. 3(3-0) F. (See physics, page 210.) 

NE 514 Principles of Fusion Reactors. Preqs.: NE 503, NE 507. 3(3-0) S. Provides an in- 
troduction to plasma concepts and fusion reactor design. Topics include: basics of ther- 
monuclear reactions, plasma confinement, formation and heating of plasmas, reactor con- 
cepts and designs, materials problems, and environmental effects. 

Saxe, Elleman, Verghese 

NE (MAT) 562 Materials Problems in Nuclear Engineering. Preq.: Advanced un- 
dergrad. standing. 3(3-0) F. Reactor component design considerations determined by 
materials properties as well as by nuclear function are covered. Emphasis is placed on radia- 
tion effects and other concepts pertinent to the selection of materials for nuclear reactors for 
either terrestrial or space applications. Beeler, Fahmy 

NE (MAT) 573 Computer Experiments in Materials and Nuclear Engineering. Preq.: 
Advanced undergrad. standing. 3(3-0) S. Monte Carlo and dynamical computer experiments 
are covered from the standpoint of how to design and use them in materials and nuclear 
engineering work. Graduate Staff 

NE (CE) 574 Environmental Consequences of Nuclear Power. Preq.: CI. 3(3-0) S. 
Evaluation of environmental consequences resulting from electrical power generation, with 
emphasis on siting, construction, and operation of nuclear power plants. Topics include: 
growth in electrical demand, alternative sources of power and their environmental aspects; 
fuel reprocessing; sources and treatment of solid, liquid, and gaseous wastes; sources and ef- 
fects of waste heat; federal and state regulations, including Environmental Impact State- 
ments. Kohl, Zumwalt, Smallwood 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 201 

NE 591, 592 Special Topics in Nuclear Engineering I, II. Preq.: CI. 3(3-0) F,S. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

NE 601 Reactor Theory and Analysis. Preq.: NE 502, NE 503, CI. 3(3-0) F. Theoretical 
aspects of neutron diffusion and transport related to the design computation and perfor- 
mance analysis of nuclear reactors. Principal topics are a unified view of the neutron cycle 
including slowing, resonance capture and thermalization; reactor dynamics and control; fuel 
cycle studies; and neutron transport methods. Background is provided for research in power 
and test reactor analysis. Murray, Siewert 

NE 602 Advanced Reactor Theory. Preq.: NE 601. 3(3-0) S. A complete presentation of 
the singular eigenfunction expansion technique as applied in neutron transport theory for 
the analysis of nuclear reactors and to radiative heat transfer problems for participating 
media. Siewert 



NE 611 Radiation Detection. Preq.: NE 501, NE 506, CI. 3(2-2) F. Covers the advanced 
aspects of radiation detection such as computer methods applied to gamma-ray spectroscopy, 
absolute detector efficiencies by experimental and Monte Carlo techniques, the use and 
theory of solid state detectors, time-of-flight detection experiments, and Mossbauer and 
other resonance phenomena. Gardner 

NE 620 Nuclear Radiation Attenuation. Preq.: NE 502, NE 508, CI. 3(3-0) F. The physical 
theory and mathematical analysis of the penetration of neutrons, gamma-rays and charged 
particles. Analytical techniques include point kernels, transport theory, Monte Carlo and 
numerical methods. Digital computers are employed in the solution of practical problems. 

Graduate Staff 

NE 621 Radiation Effects on Materials. Preq.: NE 507, CI. 3(3-0) F. Interactions of radia- 
tion with matter, with emphasis on the physical effects. Current theories and experimental 
techniques are discussed. Annealing of defects, radiation induced changes in physical proper- 
ties, and effects in reactor materials are discussed. Zumwalt, Elleman 

NE 622 Transport of Matter in Nuclear Reactors. Preqs.: NE 507, CI. 3(3-0) S. 
Mechanisms of fission product migration in reactor solids and fluids. Emphasis is on absorp- 
tion phenomena, thermodynamics of reversible processes, diffusion mathematics and ex- 
perimental methods. Zumwalt 

NE 631 Reactor Kinetics and Control. Preq.: NE 505, CI. 3(3-0) S. A study of the control 
of nuclear reactor systems. Basic control theory is developed including the use of Bode, Ny- 
quist, and S-plane diagrams, and state-variable methods. Reactor and reactor systems are 
analyzed by these methods and control methods and optimum-control methods are 
developed. Models for reactors and reactor-associated units, such as heat exchangers, are dis- 
cussed. The effects of non-linearities are presented. Saxe 

NE 641 Radioisotopes Applications. Preq.: NE 506, CI. 3(3-0) S. Principles and techni- 
ques of radioisotope applications are presented. Topics include radiotracer principles, 
radiotracer applications to engineering processes, radioisotope gauging principles and 
charged particle, gamma ray and neutron radioisotope gauges. Gardner 

NE 653 Nuclear Reactor Design. Preq.: NE 601. 3(3-0) F. A. comprehensive analysis and 
design of a nuclear system or facility suggested and advised on by department faculty will be 
performed. The class is organized under the project engineering scheme, with work taking 
the form of feasibility study, and conceptual, preliminary or parametric analysis and design. 



202 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Interdisciplinary topics such as siting, safety analysis, shielding, engineered safety features, 
protection systems, economics, material selection, quality assurance and project manage- 
ment are key parts of the course. Results are reviewed by an interdepartmental board. 

Graduate Staff 

NE 691, 692 Advanced Topics in Nuclear Engineering I, II. Preq.: CI. 3(3-0) F,S. A 
study of recent development in nuclear engineering theory and practice. Graduate Staff 

NE 695 Seminar in Nuclear Engineering. 1(1-0) F,S. Discussion of selected topics in 
nuclear engineering. Graduate Staff 

NE 699 Research in Nuclear Engineering. Preq.: Grad. standing. Credits Arranged. In- 
dividual research in the field of nuclear engineering. Graduate Staff 



Nutrition 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. M. Leatherwood, Coordinator 

Professors: L. W. Aurand, E. R. Barrick, A. J. Clawson, W. E. Donaldson, R. W. 
Harvey, E. E. Jones, C. H. Hill, J. G. Lecce, R. D. Mochrie, A. H. Rakes, H. A. 
Ramsey, H. A. Schneider, S. B. Tove; Extension Professor: E. S. Cofer; 
Professors Emeriti: F. H. Smith, G. H. Wise; Associate Professors: J. D. Garlich, 
J. J. McNeill; Assistant Professors: W. D. Armstrong, J. C. H. Shih 

Graduate study leading to either a Master of Science or a Doctor of Philosophy 
degree in nutrition may be taken under the direction of the graduate faculty in the 
interdepartmental nutrition program. The student will be associated with one or 
more of the following participating departments: animal science, biochemistry, 
food science or poultry science. The student will reside and conduct research in the 
department of his or her major adviser. Co-majors involving either the associated 
departments or related disciplines are permitted. Minors in the program may be in 
biochemistry, microbiology, physiology, statistics or other approved graduate 
fields. 

The program involves various species of animals; therefore, the comparative and 
fundamental approach to nutrition is emphasized. Research facilities in each of the 
departments are extensive and the problems under investigation are many and 
varied. Additional information about the program may be obtained by writing to 
the Coordinator, Nutrition Program, P.O. Box 5127, School of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

NTR 415 Comparative Nutrition. Preq.: CH 220 or 221. 3(3-0) F. 

NTR 416 Quantitative Nutrition. Preq.: BCH 351. 3(1-6) S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 203 

Associated courses related to nutrition are: 

FS 400 Foods and Nutrition. 

FS 402 Food Chemistry. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

NTR 590 Topical Problems in Nutrition. Preq.: Grad. or sr. standing. 1-6 F,S. Analysis 
of problems of current interest in nutrition. Credit for this course will involve the scientific 
appraisal and solution of a selected problem. The problems will be designed to provide train- 
ing and experience in research. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

NTR 601 Amino Acids, Vitamins, and Minerals in Nutrition. Preqs.: BCH 551, ZO 421, 
a 400-level nutrition course. 4(4-0) S. This course is designed to give the student knowledge in 
depth of the nutritional biochemistry of amino acids, vitamins and minerals. Nutritional 
principles are presented and interpreted from the viewpoint of metabolic pathways and 
biochemical reaction mechanisms. Garlich 

NTR 608 Energy Metabolism. Preqs.: BCH 551, general biochemistry and an introduc- 
tory NTR course. 3(3-0) F. This course relates biochemical and physiological events within 
the cell, tissue, organ and system with the nutrient needs as sources of energy for productive 
animal life. Digestion, absorption and metabolism of energy sources will be discussed. 
Processes of energy transformations within living structures will be presented in relation to 
free energy, biological oxidations, coupled reactions, anabolic and catabolic systems, 
metabolic control and efficiency. Leatherwood 

NTR 690 Advanced Special Problems in Nutrition. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-6 F,S. 
Directed research in a specialized phase of nutrition designed to provide experience in 
research methodology and philosophy. Graduate Staff 

NTR 699 Research in Nutrition. Preq.: Grad. standing. Credits Arranged. F,S. Original 
research preparatory to the thesis for the Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degree. 

Graduate Staff 



Occupational Education 

For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see occupational 
education under education, page 105. 



Operations Research 

PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

Professor: S. E. Elmaghraby, Chairman and Program Director 

Professors: B. B. Bhattacharyya, J. W. Bishir, W. Chou, W. S. Galler, H. J. Gold, 
W. L. Hafley; Associate Professors: W. D. Cooper, J. Dunn, D. F. McAllister, H. 



204 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

L. W. Nuttle, W. E. Robbins, S. Stidham Jr.; Assistant Professors: M. L. Gard- 
ner, W. A. Gruver, T. W. Rieland; Visiting Assistant Professor: S. H. Lee 

Operations research is a graduate program of a multidisciplinary nature, gover- 
ned by an administrative board and the program committee, and administered 
through the office of the program director. 

The program offers the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 
Both are research degrees requiring a thesis. A foreign language is not required at 
the master's level and is optional with the student's advisory committee at the doc- 
toral level. A brochure is available which describes in more detail the requirements 
for both degrees. 

An advanced program of study in operations research implies intensive study in 
at least two of the following areas: mathematical optimization, dynamical systems 
and control theory, stochastic systems, econometrics and economic decision theory 
and information and cybernetics. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

OR 493 Special Topics in Operations Research. Preqs.: Jr. or Sr. standing, MA 112. 1-3 
F.S.Sum. 

CENTRAL COURSES 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

OR 501 Introduction to Operations Research. Preqs.: MA 405, 421. 3(3-0) F.Sum. OR Ap- 
proach: modeling, constraints, objective and criterion. The problem of Multiple criteria. Op- 
timization, Model validation. The team approach. Systems Design. Examples, OR 
Methodology: mathematical programming; optimum seeking; simulation, gaming; heuristic 
programming. Examples. OR Applications; theory of inventory; economic ordering under 
deterministic and stochastic demand. The production smoothing problem; linear and 
quadratic cost functions. Waiting line problems: single and multiple servers with Poisson in- 
put and output. The theory of games for two-person competitive situations. Project manage- 
ment through PERT-CPM. Elmaghraby, Lee 

OR (IE, MA) 505 Mathematical Programming I. Preq.: MA 405. 3(3-0) F.Sum. A study of 
mathematical methods applied to problems of planning. Linear programming will be covered 
in detail. This course is intended for those who desire to study this subject in depth and 
detail. It provides a rigorous and complete development of the theoretical and computational 
aspects of this technique as well as a discussion of a number of applications. 

Lee, Reiland 

OR 506 Algorithmic Methods in Nonlinear Programming. Preqs.: MA 301, MA 405, 
knowledge of computer language, such as Fortran or PLl. 3(3-0) F. Introduction to methods 
for obtaining approximate solutions to unconstrained and constrained minimization 
problems of moderate size. Emphasis on geometrical interpretation and actual coordinate 
descent, steepest descent, Newton and quasi-Newton methods, conjugate gradient search, 
gradient projection and penalty function methods for constrained problems. Specialized 
problems and algorithms will be treated as time permits. Reiland 

OR (IE) 509 Dynamic Programming. Preqs.: MA 405, ST 421. 3(3-0) S. An introduction 
to the theory and computational aspects of dynamic programming and its application to 
sequential decision problems. Elmaghraby, Nuttle 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 205 

OR 520 Theory of Activity Networks. Preqs.: OR 501, OR (IE, MA) 505. 3(3-0) S. In- 
troduction to graph theory and network theory. A discussion in depth of the theory underly- 
ing (1) deterministic activity networks (CPM): optimal time-cost trade offs; the problem of 
scarce resources; (2) probabilistic activity networks (PERT): critical evaluation of the un- 
derlying assumptions; (3) generalized activity networks (GERT, GAN): applications of signal 
flow graphs and semi-Markov process to probabilistic branching; relation to the theory of 
scheduling. (Offered in alt. years.) Elmaghraby 

OR (IE) 522 Organizational Systems Dynamics. Preqs.: ST 371, IE 421. 3(3-0) F. A 
study of the behavior of large organizations as simulated on a large digital computer and 
driven by suitable exogeneous inputs. Basic theory of feedback control of systems; methods 
of modeling for continuous simulation, including aspects of management policy. Projects 
cover study, modeling and simulation of industrial, business, political social organizations 
and systems; methods of changing system behavior by modifying parameters and model 
structure. Llewellyn 

OR (CHE) 527 Optimization of Engineering Processes. Preqs.: CSC 111, MA 301 and 
MA 405. 3(3-0) S. The formulation and solution of process optimization problems, with 
emphasis on nonlinear programming techniques. Computer implementation of optimization 
algorithms, and structuring of process models to increase computational efficiency. 

Felder 

OR (E) 531 Dynamical Systems and Multivariate Control. Preqs.: MA 301, 405 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Introduction to analytical modeling, control and optimization of 
dynamical systems based on state space and transfer function descriptions. Emphasis on 
linear, continuous-time and discrete-time systems. Topics include state variables, 
transforms, flow graphs, canonical forms, system response, stability, controllability and ob- 
servability, modal control, non-interacting control, observers, fundamental concepts of op- 
timal control and estimation. Multidisciplinary applications chosen from biological, 
chemical, economic, electrical, mechanical and sociological systems. Gruver, Lee 

OR (MAE) 545 Variational Methods in Optimization Techniques I. Preqs.: MA 511, 
MA 512. 3(3-0) Alt. F. Variational methods are applied to optimization problems in engineer- 
ing, where examples are drawn from flight mechanics, operations research, heat transfer, 
structures and aerodynamics. The necessary conditions which follow from the general varia- 
tion of a functional are developed. Solutions with corners and discontinuities are considered. 
Inequality constraints on control variables and constrained extrema are also considered. 
Gradient methods are described. Maday 

OR (IE) 561 Queues and Stochastic Service Systems. Preq.: MA 421. 3(3-0) F. General 
concepts of stochastic processes are introduced. Poisson processes, Markov processes, and 
renewal theory are presented. These are then used in the analysis of queues, starting with a 
completely memoryless queue to one with general parameters. Applications to many 
engineering problems will be considered. Stidham 

OR (CSC, IE) 562 Advanced Topics in Computer Simulation. 3(3-0) S. (See computer 
science, page 87.) 

OR (CSC, MA) 585 Graph Theory- Preqs.: MA 231 or 405. 3(3-0) F. Basic concepts of 
graph theory. Trees and forests. Vector spaces associated with a graph. Representation of 
graphs by binary matrices and list structures. Traversability. Connectivity. Matchings and 
assignment problems. Planar graphs. Colorability. Directed graphs. Applications of graph 
theory with emphasis on organizing problems in a form suitable for computer solution. 

Gardner 



206 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

OR (IE, MA) 586 Network Flows. Preq.: OR (IE, MA) 505 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. This 
course will study problems of flows in networks. These problems will include the determina- 
tion of the shortest chain, maximal flow and minimal cost flow in networks. The relationship 
between network flows and linear programming will be developed as well as problems with 
nonlinear cost functions, multi-commodity flows, and the problem of network synthesis. (Of- 
fered in alt. years.) Gardner, Lee 

OR 591 Special Topics in Operations Research. Preq.: CI. 1-3 F,S. Individual or small 
group studies of special areas of OR which fit into the students' programs of study and which 
may not be covered by other OR courses. Furthermore, the course serves as a vehicle for in- 
troducing new or specialized topics at the introductory graduate level. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

OR (CSC) 605 Large Scale Linear Programming Systems. Preqs.: OR 505 and FOR- 
TRAN programming experience. 3(3-0) S. A study of the specialized algorithms for the ef- 
ficient solution of large scale LP problems. Includes: parametric programming, bounded 
variable algorithms, generalized upper bounding, decomposition, separable programming, 
and mixed integer programming. Emphasis is on gaining firsthand practical experience with 
current computer codes and computational procedures. Lee, McAllister 

OR (MA, ST) 606 Mathematical Programming II. Preq.: OR (IE, MA ) 505. 3(3-0) S. 
This course provides an advanced mathematical treatment of the analytical and algorithmic 
aspects of finite dimensional nonlinear programming. It includes an examination of the 
structure and effectiveness of computational methods for unconstrained and constrained 
minimization. Special attention will be directed toward current research and recent develop- 
ments in the field. Bhattacharyya, Reiland 

OR 609 Advanced Dynamic Programming. Preqs.: OR 509, MA 541. 3(3-0) F. Introduc- 
tion to measure theoretic concepts, review of finite state Markov processes, theory of Marko- 
vian programming, discrete decision processes, continuous time dynamic programming, 
relation to calculus of variation and the Maximum Principle. Emphasis throughout is on re- 
cent theoretical development in the field. (Offered in alt. years.) Elmaghraby 

OR (MA) 614 Integer Programming. Preqs.: MA 405, OR (MA, IE) 505; Coreq.: Some 
familiarity with computers (e.g., CSC 111). 3(3-0) Alt. S. Study of general integer program- 
ming problems and principal methods of solving them. Emphasis on intuitive presentation of 
ideas underlying various algorithms rather than detailed description of computer codes. The 
students will have some "hands on" computing experience that should enable them to adapt 
the ideas presented in the course to integer programming problems they may encounter. 

Lee 

OR (MA) 629 Vector Space Methods in System Optimization. Preqs.: MA 405, 511 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Introduction to algebraic and function-analytic concepts used in system 
modeling and optimization: vector space, linear mappings, spectral decomposition, adjoints, 
orthogonal projection, quality, fixed points and differentials. Emphasis on geometric insight. 
Topics include least square optimization of linear systems, minimum norm problems in 
Banach space, linearization in Hilbert space, iterative solution of system equations and op- 
timization problems. Broad range of applications in operations research and system 
engineering including control theory, mathematical programming, econometrics, statistical 
estimation, circuit theory and numerical analysis. Dunn, Gruver 

OR (MAE) 646 Variational Methods in Optimization Techniques II. Preq.: OR (MAE) 
545. 3(3-0) Alt. S. Variational methods are applied to optimization problems in engineering, 
where examples are drawn from flight mechanics, operations research, heat transfer, struc- 
tures and aerodynamics. The necessary conditions which follow from the general variation of 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 207 

a functional are developed. Solutions with corners and discontinuities are considered. Ine- 
quality constraints on control variables and constrained extrema are also considered. 
Gradient methods are described. Madav 

OR (E) 650 Algorithmic Methods in Optimal Control. Preq.: OR 629 or equivalent; 
Coreq.: Knowledge of higher level language (e.g., Fortran or PL1). 3(3-0) Alt. S. Study of 
computational methods for optimal control of dynamical systems. Emphasis on extensions of 
nonlinear programming to control problems described by differential and difference equa- 
tions. Topics include linear systems with quadratic objective, gradient and dynamic 
programming algorithms for nonlinear control problems, methods for treating control and 
state constraints, and an introduction to optimization of delay and distributed parameter 
systems. The course will include computational exercises based on applications from OR and 
engineering. Gruver 

OR 691 Special Topics in Operations Research. Preqs.: OR 501, OR (IE, MA ) 505. 3(3-0) 
F.S.Sum. The purpose of this course is to allow individual students or small groups of stu- 
dents to take on studies of special areas in OR which fit into their particular program and 
which may not be covered by other OR courses. The work will be directed by a qualified 
faculty member and in some instances by visiting professors. The subject matter in any year 
is dependent on the students and the faculty members. Graduate Staff 

OR (IE, MA) 692 Special Topics in Mathematical Programming. Preqs: OR (IE, MA) 
505. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. The study of special advanced topics in the area of mathematical 
programming. New techniques and current research in this area will be discussed. The 
faculty responsible for this course will select according to their preference and interest the 
areas to be covered during the semester. This course will not necessarily be taught by an in- 
dividual faculty but can, on occasion, be a joint effort of several faculty members from this 
University as well as visiting faculty from other institutions. To date, courses on Theory of 
Networks, Optimal Control Algorithms and Integer Programming have been offered under 
the umbrella of this course. It is anticipated that these two topics will be repeated in the 
future, together with other topics. Graduate Staff 

OR 695 Seminar in Operations Research. Preq.: Enrollment in OR as a major or minor. 
1(1-0) F,S. Seminar discussion of operations research problems. Case analyses and reports. 
Graduate students with minors or majors in operations research are expected to attend 
throughout the period of their residence. Reiland 

OR 699 Project in Operations Research. Preqs.: Variable. 1-3 F,S,Sum. Individual 
research by graduate students minoring and majoring in operations research. Research may 
be done under the operations research faculty member meeting the interest need of the stu- 
dent. Graduate Staff 

SUGGESTED COGNATE COURSES 

Cognate courses in the operations research program are courses often included in 
programs of study but which carry other departmental designations. They cover 
subject matter closely related to operations research and provide additional insight 
into the basis or application of operations research techniques. Students should not 
assume they will be able to include any of the cognate courses in their own program 
of study unless they have made previous arrangements with their faculty advisor. 

Biomathematics 

BMA (MA, ST) 571, 572 Biomathematics I & II 



208 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Chemical Engineering 

CHE 525 Chemical Process Control 

Civil Engineering 

CE 575 Civil Engineering Systems 

Computer Science 

CSC (MA) 529, 530 Numerical Analysis I & II 

CSC (MA) 582 Special Topics in Numerical Solution of Linear Algebraic Equations 

CSC (MA) 583 Special Topics in the Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential E- 
quations 

CSC (MA) 584 Special Topics in the Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equa- 
tions 

Economics and Business 

EB 550 Mathematical Models in Economics 

EB 555 Linear Programming 

EB 650 Economic Decision Theory 

EB (ST) 651 Econometrics 

EB (ST) 652 Topics in Econometrics 

Electrical Engineering 

EE 516 Feedback Control Systems 

EE 521 Digital Computer Technology and Design 

EE 613, 614 Advanced Feedback Control 

EE 642 Automata and Adaptive Systems 

Industrial Engineering 

IE 611 The Design of Production Systems 
IE 622 Inventory Control Methods II 

Mathematics 

MA (ST) 541 Theory of Probability 

MA (ST) 542 Introduction to Stochastic Processes 

MA (ST) 617, 618 Measure Theory and Advanced Probability 

MA (ST) 619 Topics in Advanced Probability 

MA 622 Linear Transformations and Matrix Theory 

MA (CSC) 635 Functional Analysis and Numerical Analysis 

MA 641, 642 Calculus of Variations and Theory of Optimal Control I & II 

MA 685 Special Topics in Numerical Analysis 

Statistics 

ST 583 Introduction to Statistical Decision Theory 
ST 613, 614 Time Series Analysis I & II 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 209 

Pest Management 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Assistant Professor B. C. Haning, Program Coordinator 

Professors: C. W. Averre, R. C. Axtell, E. B. Cowling, D. W. Hayne, S. F. Jenkins, 
W. M. Lewis, T. J. Monaco, R. L. Rabb, R. A. Reinert, G. C. Rock, T. J. Sheets, A. 
D. Worsham; Extension Professors: W. A. Skroch, G. T. Weekman; Associate 
Professors: M. K. Beute, J. R. Bradley Jr., G. A. Carlson, H. D. Coble, F. T. Cor- 
bin, L. T. Lucas, C. E. Main, P. B. Shoemaker, R. E. Stinner, L. Thompson Jr., C. 
R. Unrath, J. W. Van Duyn, D. C. Zeiger; Extension Associate Professor: K. A. 
Sorenson; Assistant Professors: J. T. Ambrose, C. S. Apperson, M. A. Cohen, G. 
G. Kennedy, 0. T. Sanders, D. P. Schmitt, T. B. Sutton 

Effective pest management systems that are compatible with environmental 
concerns must be directed by broadly informed individuals. They must understand 
the basic biology and ecology of the pests that reduce crop yield and quality. Many 
compelling reasons place high priority on the development of pest management 
programs that integrate the theoretical and practical aspects of cultural, biological, 
and chemical controls into functional and practical systems for maintaining pest 
populations at levels that do not cause economic damage. This awareness and its 
implementation open new career opportunities in integrated pest management. 

A graduate minor in pest management at the master's level for either the Master 
of Science (M.S.) or the Master of Agriculture (M.A.) is available. This option is 
designed to provide the student with an understanding of the theory and concepts 
of integrated pest management. This program utilizes faculty from the Depart- 
ments of Horticultural Science, Crop Science, Entomology, and Plant Pathology 
and is administered by an Integrated Pest Management Advisory Committee. The 
minor will be represented on the graduate advisory committees by a faculty ad- 
visor. The required courses (or their equivalents) for a minor in pest management 
are as follows: PM 415, Principles of Pest Management (3 credits), and PM 490, Pest 
Management Seminar (1 credit), and at least one graduate course in each of the 
following areas: plant pathology, entomology, and weed science. Additionally, a 
course in ecology is recommended. 

Additional information may be obtained by contacting a faculty advisor or the 
Coordinator, Pest Management Program, Box 5397, North Carolina State Univer- 
sity, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607. 



Physical Oceanography 

For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see geosciences, 
page 153 and marine sciences, page 171. 



210 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

OY (CE, MAS) 487 Physical Oceanography. Preqs.: MA 202, PY 212. 3(3-0) F. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

OY (CE, MAS) 541 Gravity Wave Theory I. Preq.: ESM 303 or PY 411. 3(3-0) S. 
Classical gravity wave theory with emphasis on the basic mechanics of wave motions, mass 
transport induced by waves and various conservation laws with their applications in wave 
study. Weisberg 

OY (MAS) 551 Ocean Circulation. Preq.: ESM 303 or PY 411. 3(3-0) S. Basic study of the 
mechanics of ocean circulation with emphasis on various simple models of circulation 
systems. Pietrafesa 

OY (MAE, MAS) 563 Geophysical Fluid Mechanics. Preq.: MAE 550 or equivalent. 3(3- 
0) Alt. F. The principles of fluid mechanics are applied to geophysical systems. Special 
emphasis is placed on those features of these systems, such as almost rigid rotation, and 
stable stratification, which produce unique and important effects. The effects of almost rigid 
rotations on homogeneous and stratified flows are examined in detail. (Offered 1979-80 and 
alt. years.) Janowitz 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

OY (MAS) 601, 602 Advanced Physical Oceanography I, II. Preq.: OY (CE, MAS) 487. 
3(3-0) F,S. An in-depth discussion of physical oceanography— both geographic and 
hydrodynamical aspects. Topics discussed include relief of ocean floor; physical properties of 
sea water; distribution of temperature, salinity and currents; and kinematical and 
dynamical studies of motion of sea water turbulence. Pietrafesa 

OY (MAE, MAS) 663 Advanced Geophysical Fluid Mechanics. Preq.: MAE 550 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) Alt. S. The principles of fluid mechanics are applied to geophysical 
systems. Special emphasis is placed on the role of stable stratification on the flows in these 
systems. The generation, interaction, propagation and dissipation of internal gravity waves 
are studied in detail. Other geophysically important flows are also studied. (Offered 1979-80 
and alt. years.) Janowitz 

OY (MAE, MAS) 664, 665 Perturbation Method in Fluid Mechanics I, II. Preqs.: MA 
401, ESM 303. 3(3-0) F,S. Basic theory and application of perturbation methods in fluid 
mechanics including: regular and singular perturbations, matching principles, method of 
strained coordinate, two variable expansion and applications to partial differential equa- 
tions. (Offered 1978-79 and alt. years.) Janowitz 



Physics 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor R. R. Patty, Acting Head and Graduate Administrator 

Professors: W. R. Davis, W. O. Doggett, G. L. Hall, A. W. Jenkins Jr., G. H. Kat- 
zin, E. R. Manring, J. D. Memory, A. C. Menius Jr., G. E. Mitchell, M. K. Moss, J. 
Y. Park, L. W. Seagondollar, D. R. Tilley, A. W. Waltner; Adjunct Professor: V. 
L. Granatstein; Professors Emeriti: W. H. Bennett, F. W. Lancaster, J. T. Lynn, 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 211 

J. S. Meares; Associate Professors: K. T. Chung, G. C. Cobb, C. R. Gould, C. E. 
Johnson, Fred Lado, D. H. Martin, G. W. Parker, J. F. Schetzina; Adjunct 
Associate Professor: W. P. Kirk II; Assistant Professors: C. M. Armstrong, S. R. 
Cotanch, D. G. Haase, J. J. Kim, M. A. Klenin, J. R. Mowat, J. S. Risley, D. E. 
Sayers; Adjunct Assistant Professor: R. K. Parker 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 

J. M. A. Danby (Mathematics), R. E. Fornes (Textiles), R. L. Murray (Nuclear 
Engineering), D. L. Ridgeway (Statistics) 

Study in physics is available leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doc- 
tor of Philosophy. In addition to the areas of research listed below, thesis work may 
also be done in closely related departments in the fields of biophysics, environmen- 
tal sciences, nuclear reactor theory and computer science. Available to the depart- 
ment are the computer facilities (including the IBM System 370/165 computer) of 
the nearby Triangle Universities Computation Center which is jointly operated by 
Duke University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North 
Carolina State University. These three universities also jointly staff the Triangle 
Universities Nuclear Laboratory located on the Duke campus. The major facilities 
are a 15 MeV model FN Tandem Van De Graaff accelerator with a 15 MeV 
cyclotron injector and on-line computer facilities. 

Experimental along with theoretical work is being done in atmospheric physics, 
atomic and molecular physics, magnetic resonance, nuclear physics, plasma 
physics and solid state physics. Theoretical work is in relativity and general field 
theory and in statistical theory. 

Programs of study leading to the Master of Science degree require a minimum of 
30 semester hours, including four credits of research and two of seminar. In addi- 
tion, a thesis is required. 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is granted on successful completion of examina- 
tions, independent research and the submission of an acceptable dissertation. A 
minor area of study is required. 

A large number of teaching and research assistantships are available. Depending 
upon the student's experience, these pay from $3,500 to $4,600 for half-time duties 
during the nine-month school year and allow the student to carry 60 percent of a 
full course load. An out-of-state student holding such a half-time assistantship 
may be eligible for special tuition charges. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

PY 401, 402 Modern and Quantum Physics I, II. Preq.: PY 411. 3(3-0) F,S. 

PY 407 Introduction to Modern Physics. Preqs.: PY 208, MA 202. 3(3-0) F,S. 

PY 410 Introductory Nuclear Physics. Preq.: PY 203 or 407. 4(3-2) P.S. 

PY 411, 412 Mechanics I, II. Preqs.: PY 203 or 208, MA 301. 3(3-0) F.S. 

PY 413 Thermal Physics. Preq.: PY 202 or 208; Coreq.: MA 301v3(3-0) S. 



212 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

PY 414, 415 Electricity and Magnetism I, II. Preqs.: PY 203 or 208, MA 301. 3(3-0) F,S. 

PY 441 Spacetime Physics. Preq.: PY 203 or 407. 3(3-0) F. 

PY 451, 452 Intermediate Experiments in Physics I, II. Coreqs.: PY 411, 414. 2(1-3) F,S. 

PY 499 Special Problems in Physics. Preq.: Permission of department. 1-3 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PY 506 Nuclear Physics I. Preqs.: PY 203 or 407; PY 412. 4(3-2) F. Nuclear properties and 
phenomena such as alpha, beta and gamma decay, accelerator-induced nuclear reactions and 
fission. Emphasis on experimental techniques for probing nuclear structure and interpreta- 
tion of results in terms of current theories. Gould 

PY 508 Ion and Electron Physics. Preq.: PY 414. 3(2-2) F. Topics include collision 
processes, electron emission, charged particle dynamics, gaseous discharges, and the physics 
of ion and electron beams. Doggett 

PY 509 Plasma Physics. Preq.: PY 414. 3(3-0) F. The individual and collective motion of 
charged particles in electric and magnetic fields and through ionized gases. Doggett 

PY 510 Nuclear Physics II. Preq.: PY 410. 4(3-2) S. The properties of the atomic nucleus 
as revealed by radioactivity, nuclear reactions and scattering experiments with emphasis on 
the experimental approach. The laboratory stresses independent research and offers project 
work in nuclear spectroscopy and in neutron physics. Waltner 

PY (NE) 511 Nuclear Physics for Engineers. Preq.: PY 410. 3(3-0) F. The properties of 
atomic nuclei, of nuclear radiations and of the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter. 
Emphasis on the principles of modern equipment and techniques of nuclear measurement 
and their application to practical problems. Waltner 

PY 516 Physical Optics. Preq.: PY 415. 3(2-2) F. Emphasis on the wave properties of light. 
Subjects include boundary conditions, optics of thin films, interference and diffraction, ap- 
plications to absorption, scattering, and laser operation. A background in Maxwell's equa- 
tions and vector analysis is required. Manring 

PY 517 Atomic and Molecular Physics. Preqs.: PY 401, 412. 3(3-0) S. The quantum 
mechanical treatment of structure and spectra for atoms and molecules. Topics include the 
hydrogen atom, helium atom, multielectron atoms, selection rules, diatomic and simple 
polyatomic molecules, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Johnson 

PY 520 Measurements in Nuclear Physics. Preq.: PY 410. 3(2-2) S. Fundamentals of 
statistics (including the binomial, normal, Poisson and interval distributions) as applied to 
the analysis of measurements on nuclear reactions and radioactivity. Waltner 

PY 521 Statistical Physics I. Preqs.: PY 401, PY 413. 3(3-0) S. The basic elements of 
kinetic theory and equilibrium statistical mechanics, both classical and quantum; applica- 
tions of the techniques developed to various ideal models of noninteracting particles. 

Lado 

Pt 343 AotmDhvsics. Preqs.: PY 203 or 407; PY 411. 3(3-0) S. The basic physics necessary 
to investigate, from observational data, the internal conditions and evolution of stars. Topics 
include the formation and structure of spectral lines, methods of energy generation and 
transport, stellar structure, degeneracy, white dwarfs and neutron stars. Danby 

PY 552 Introduction to the Structure of Solids. Preq.: PY 401. 3(3-0) S. Basic considera- 
tions of crystalline solids, metals, conductors and semiconductors. Schetzina 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 213 

PY (MA) 555 Mathematical Introduction to Celestial Mechanics. 3(3-0) F. (See 
mathematics, page 177.) 

PY (MA) 556 Orbital Mechanics. 3(3-0) S. (See mathematics, page 177.) 

PY 581, 582 Quantum Mechanics I, II. Preqs.: MA 512; PY 411 or 414; grad. standing or 
permission of the graduate administrator. 3(3-0) F,S. Fundamental concepts and formula- 
tions, including interpretation and techniques, and the application of theory to simple 
physical systems, such as the free particle, the harmonic oscillator, the particle in a potential 
well and central force problems. Other topics include approximation methods, identical par- 
ticles and spin, transformation theory, symmetries and invariance, and an introduction to 
quantum theory of scattering and angular momentum. Johnson 

PY 583, 584 Advanced Classical Mechanics I, II. Preqs.: MA 512, PY 412, PY 414; grad. 
standing or permission of the graduate administrator. 3(3-0) F,S. An introduction to 
theoretical physics in preparation for advanced study. Emphasis is on classical mechanics, 
special relativity and the motion of charged particles. Topics include variational principles, 
Hamiltonian dynamics and the canonical transformation theory, structure of the Lorentz 
group and elementary dynamics of unquantized fields. Hall 

PY 585, 586 Advanced Electricity and Magnetism I, II. Preqs.: PY 415; grad. standing 
or permission of the graduate administrator. 3(3-0) F,S. Topics include: techniques for the 
solution of potential problems, development of Maxwell's equations; wave equations, energy, 
force and momentum relations of an electromagnetic field; covariant formulation of elec- 
trodynamics; radiation from accelerated charges. Chung 

PY 599 Senior Research. Preq.: Sr. honors program standing, except with special permis- 
sion. 3(3-0) F,S. Investigations in physics under staff guidance. May consist of literature 
reviews, experimental measurements or theoretical studies. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PY 600 Planetary Atmospheres. Preq.: PY 517. 3(3-0) S. Gas dynamics of atmospheres 
with emphasis on recent results of rocket, satellite and interplanetary probes. Theories of the 
airglow, aurora and ionosphere are developed. Manring 

PY 601, 602 Theoretical Physics I, II. Preqs.: PY 583, 586; Coreq.: MA 661. 3(3-0) F,S. 
The mathematical and theoretical approach to the relationships between various branches of 
physics is treated. The restricted theory of relativity, electro-dynamics, classical field theory 
and the general theory of relativity and geometro-dynamics are considered. Davis 

PY 610 Theoretical Nuclear Physics. Preqs.: PY 506, PY 581. 3(3-0) Alt. S. A study of 
theoretical methods and applications of quantum mechanics on various nuclear problems. 
Topics include nucleon-nucleon interaction, nuclear scattering theory, angular momentum 
theory (Racah algebra), polarization, theories of nuclear structure including the shell model, 
collective models and unified model nuclear reaction theories including compound nucleus, 
optical model, direct reactions, nuclear fission and nuclear fusion, energy production in stars 
and heavy-ion physics. Graduate Staff 

PY 611 Advanced Quantum Mechanics I. Preqs.: MA 512, PY 582. 3(3-0) F. An introduc- 
tion to the relativistic quantum theory of Dirac particles and the positron. Other topics in- 
clude second quantization technique and its application to many-body problems, radiation 
theory and the quantization of the electromagnetic field. Cotanch 

PY 612 Advanced Quantum Mechanics II. Preqs.: PY 601, 611. 3(3-0) S. A general 
propagator treatment of Dirac particles, photons, and scalar and vector mesons. Applica- 
tions of Feynman graphs and rules will be given illustrating basic techniques employed in 



214 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

the treatment of electromagnetic, weak and strong interactions. Renormalization theory, the 
effects of radiative corrections and aspects of the general Lorentz covariant theory of quan- 
tized fields will also be considered. Cotanch 

PY 622 Statistical Physics II. Preq.: PY 521. 3(3-0) F. A continuation of PY 521, with 
emphasis on the static and dynamic properties of real (interacting) systems. Topics will in- 
clude the equilibrium theory of fluids and the linear response theory of time-dependent 
phenomena. Lado 

PY 630, 631 Nuclear Structure Physics I, II. Preqs.: PY 582; PY 506 or 510. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Advanced description of nuclear models and nuclear reactions. Topics include: internucleon 
forces, compound-nucleus processes, shell model, optical model, R-matrix theory, direct reac- 
tions, collective model, electromagnetic transitions, isobaric analog states. Mitchell 

PY 641 Non-Inertial Space Mechanics. Preqs.: MA 661, PY 601; Coreq.: PY 602. 3(3-0) S. 
This course treats the theoretical description of the phenomena of mechanics relating to non- 
inertial frames of reference, with applications to space travel and the instrumentation 
problems of rocketry. Applications to inertial guidance and electromagnetic-inertial coupling 
effects are also considered. Davis 

PY 651 Mathematics of Solid-State and Many-Body Theory- Preqs.: MA 513, PY 552, 
PY 582. 3(3-0) F. Fourier techniques from solid-state theory are generalized and adapted to 
many areas of physics. Topics include: Fourier series in n-dimensional Bravais lattices, 
Fourier integrals, Schwartz distributions, Brillouin zones, Green's function, Patterson func- 
tions, convolutions and correlation coefficients. The Poisson sum formula and the theta func- 
tion summation method are extensively developed for Bravais and non-Bravais lattices in n- 
dimensions. Hall 

PY 652 Cooperative Phenomena in Solids. Preq.: PY 651. 3(3-0) S. Classical and quantum 
theories of equilibrium and transport properties of ferromagnetism, antiferromagnetism, 
and order-disorder in alloys. Statistical mechanics of, and phase transitions in, these and 
other systems are treated. Hall 

The following five courses offer opportunities for advanced study in special areas of physics 
under staff members working in these areas. 

PY 690 Special Topics in Molecular Physics. Preq.: CI. 1-6 F,S. 

PY 691 Special Topics in Nuclear Physics. Preq.: CI. 1-6 F,S. 

PY 692 Special Topics in Plasma Physics. Preq.: CI. 1-6 F,S. 

PY 693 Special Topics in Solid State Physics. Preq.: CI. 1-6 F,S. 

PY 694 Special Topics in Theoretical Physics. Preq.: CI. 1-6 F.S. 

PY 695 Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Reports on topics of current interest in physics. Several sec- 
tions are offered so that students with common research interests may be grouped together. 

Graduate Staff 

PY 699 Research. Credits Arranged. Graduate students sufficiently prepared may under- 
take research in some selected field of physics. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 215 

Physiology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professors: L. Goode, C. H. Hill, E. Hodgson, T. E. LeVere, I. S. Longmuir, J. F. 
Roberts, D. E. Smith, L. C. Ulberg; Associate Professors: E. V. Caruolo, B. H. 
Johnson, J. P. Thaxton, J. M. Whitsett, R. T. Yamamoto; Assistant Professors: F. 
W. Edens, G. W. Morgan Jr. 

Graduate study under the direction of the physiology faculty may lead to the 
Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The physiology faculty is 
an interdepartmental group drawn from the departments participating in the 
program. They are: animal science, biochemistry, entomology, poultry science, psy- 
chology, statistics and zoology. The program emphasizes the comparative approach 
implicit in this type of organization. 

Experimental facilities of the above departments are available for physiological 
research, as are such special facilities as the Electron Microscope Center and the 
Wrightsville Marine Biomedical Laboratory. Experimental animals available cover 
a wide range, from insects and other invertebrates to large mammals. 

In addition to courses in physiology, majors in the program are expected to take 
selected courses in biochemistry and cell biology. Minors are usually chosen from 
such fields as biochemistry, entomology, genetics, statistics and zoology. A strong 
basic knowledge in one of these areas is essential. 

Graduate students enrolled as physiology majors are located in the department 
of their major professor and may participate in departmental activities. 

Prerequisites for admission include a year of physics and organic chemistry, one 
course in biochemistry and physiology. The Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record 
Examination is required and the Advanced Tests in biology and chemistry are 
desirable. 

Financial assistance for qualified students in the form of research 
assistantships, fellowships and traineeships is available through participating 
departments. Prospective students may obtain further information by writing to 
any one of the graduate faculty listed above or to the Chairman, Physiology 
Program, P. 0. Box 5306, N. C. State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PHY (ANS) 502 Reproductive Physiology of Vertebrates. 3(3-0) S. (See animal science, 
page 56.) 

PHY 503 General Physiology I. Preq.: Sr. or grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. The general princi- 
ples of homeostatis will be discussed, emphasizing the importance of integrative action. The 
following systems will be studied: respiratory, cardiovascular, renal, reproductive, and 
myological. Longmuir, Staff 

PHY 504 General Physiology II. Preq.: Sr. or grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. The general princi- 
ples of homeostatis will be discussed, emphasizing the importance of integrative action. The 
following will be studied: alimentary, reticuloendothelial, central nervous, autonomic ner- 
verous, and endocrine systems; detoxication mechanisms; special senses; and the response of 
man to the environment. Longmuir, Staff 



216 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

PHY (ZO) 513 Comparative Physiology. 4(3-3) S. (see zoology, page 271.) 

PHY (MB, PO, VET) 552 Immunobiology. 3(3-0) S. (See poultry science, page 226.) 

PHY (BCH) 553 Physiological Biochemistry. 3(3-0) S. (See biochemistry, page 61.) 

PHY (ZO, ENT) 575 Physiology of Invertebrates. Preq.: ZO 202 or CI. 3(3-0) S. The 
course deals with the physiology of the invertebrates, including the Insecta but excluding the 
Protozoa. The unity of the physiology of the various groups is stressed, and the relationship 
of physiology to contemporary biology and to other related biological fields will be 
illustrated. Graduate Staff 

PHY (ANS) 580 Mammalian Endocrine Physiology. 3(3-0) F. (See animal science, page 
56.) 

PHY 590 Special Problems in Physiology. Preqs.: Grad. standing, CI. Credits Arranged. 
F,S. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY. 

PHY (ANS) 604 Experimental Animal Physiology. 4(2-4) F. (See animal science, page 
56.) 

PHY 690 Physiology Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) S. Graduate Staff 

PHY 695 Selected Topics in Physiology. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-4. Graduate Staff 

PHY 699 Physiological Research. Preqs.: Grad. standing, CI. Credits Arranged. F,S. 

Graduate Staff 

COURSES FROM ASSOCIATED DEPARTMENTS 

GN 633 Physiological Genetics. 

PO (ZO) 524 Comparative Endocrinology. 

PSY 502 Physiological Psychology. 

BCH 551 General Biochemistry. 

ZO 614 Advanced Cell Biology. 

ENT 611 Biochemistry of Insects. 

OTHER SUPPORTING COURSES AVAILABLE 

GN (ZO) 532 Biological Effects of Radiations. 

PSY 503 Comparative Psychology. 

ZO 510 Adaptive Behavior of Animals. 

PO 521 Nutrition. 

Certain courses on the interface between physiology and engineering may be 
taken after consultation with adviser and the instructors concerned. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 217 

Plant Pathology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor R. Ay cock, Head 

Professors: J. L. Apple, C. W. Averre III, K. R. Barker, C. N. Clayton, E. B. Cowl- 
ing, C. B. Davey, E. Echandi, G. V. Gooding Jr., L. F. Grand, T. T. Hebert, S. F. 
Jenkins Jr., M. P. Levi, G. B. Lucas, R. D. Milholland, N. T. Powell, J. N. Sasser, 
D. L. Strider, H. H. Triantaphyllou, N. N. Winstead; Professors USDA: R. A. 
Reinert, J. P. Ross, H. W. Spurr Jr., R. E. Welty; Adjunct Professors: G. H. 
Hepting, E. G. Kuhlman; Extension Professors: H. E. Duncan, In Charge, J. C. 
Wells; Professors Emeriti: D. E. Ellis, L. W. Nielsen, C. J. Nusbaum, F. L. 
Wellman; Associate Professors: M. K. Beute, L. T. Lucas, C. E. Main; Associate 
Professors USDA: A. S. Heagle, K. J. Leonard; Adjunct Associate Professor: N. 
A. Lapp; Extension Associate Professors: R. K. Jones, P. B. Shoemaker; 
Assistant Professors: D. M. Benson, B. C. Haning, J. S. Huang, J. W. Moyer, D. 
P. Schmitt, T. B. Sutton, C. G. Van Dyke 

The plant pathology faculty exhibits strength in forest pathology, nematology, 
virology and general plant pathology. Programs leading to the Master of 
Agriculture and Master of Life Sciences (non-thesis), Master of Science and Doctor 
of Philosophy degrees are offered. Program requirements for these three degrees 
generally follow University policies: 30 credit hours and thesis for the M.S. degree; 
36 for the Master of Agriculture and Master of Life Sciences degrees. The latter af- 
ford students an opportunity for general training with a major emphasis in plant 
pathology course work and subject matter. 

Courses and number of hours taken by Ph.D. candidates are determined by the 
student's interest and background. Strong foundation courses in mathematics, 
biochemistry, chemistry, physics and soil science are prerequisite, however, for ad- 
mission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. Students who enroll in any graduate 
program should have achieved a "B" average in the undergraduate major. 

Opportunities for employment include research, extension and teaching appoint- 
ments at Land-Grant colleges or universities and with the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture. The agricultural chemicals industry also employs plant pathologists 
in research, promotion and service. Plant pathologists often participate in foreign 
service through international and federal organizations, as well as in commercial 
enterprises. 

Separate laboratories fully equipped and staffed for research in nematology, 
virology, soil microbiology, physiology of pathogenesis and special biochemical 
problems are available. Facilities also exist for training in general phytopathology. 
Since the faculty is comprised of more than 50 scientists with varied interests, in- 
depth training in all of these areas is possible. 

The department has greenhouse facilities and access to controlled environmental 
growth chambers in the phytotron. Student participation in the Plant Disease 
Clinic provides experience in the diagnosis of all types of plant diseases. 



218 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

North Carolina exhibits a wide range of soil types and climatic areas. Large 
acreages are planted to a variety of field, vegetable and ornamental crops, as well 
as forest trees. Special facilities for experimental work on diseases of these crops 
are found at 16 permanent research stations located throughout the State. 

A number of graduate assistantships and fellowships are funded by the 
Agricultural Experiment Station, the Agricultural Foundation and other agencies. 
Stipends are adjusted to the previous training and experience of the recipients. The 
E. G. Moss and W. E. Cooper Memorial Fellowship funds supplement stipends of 
exceptional students. Students applying directly for aid from the National Science 
Foundation, the National Institutes of Health and other granting agencies are in- 
vited to specify the department as host institution. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

PP 450 Nematode Diseases of Plants and Their Control. Preq.: PP 315 or 318. 2(1-3) F. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PP 500 Plant Disease Control. Preq.: PP 315. 3(2-3) S. Disease control strategies and tac- 
tics are developed in a practical manner. Control economics and practices are considered in 
relation to principles and current research on biological, cultural, physical and chemical 
methods. Disease resistance and regulatory methods are also discussed. 

Jenkins, Spurr 

PP 501 Phytopathology I. Preq.: PP 315 or equivalent. 5(3-6) F. A study of the classifica- 
tion, terminology, etiology and basic concepts of plant diseases caused by fungi and bacteria. 
In-depth studies of selected examples are used to illustrate and integrate general principles. 
Laboratory sessions consider research and diagnostic techniques including preparation of 
media, isolation and study of pathogens in pure culture, inoculation, symptom development 
and disease measurement. Echandi 

PP 502 Phytopathology II. Preq.: PP 315 or equivalent. 5(3-6) S. A study of virus, 
nematode, and abiotic diseases of plants with an overall consideration of major topics such as 
epidemiology, and control. Laboratory sessions include basic studies of viruses, nematodes 
and epidemiology and useful research and diagnostic techniques. 

Beute, Main, Barker, Schmitt, Moyer 

PP 503 Identification of Plant Pathogenic Fungi. Preq.: Mycology or one advanced 
course in PP. 3(4-12) Sum. A study of the recognition and identification of fungi which cause 
plant diseases and the differentiation of fungal diseases from those caused by other agents. 
Special consideration is given to use of keys in the identification of fungi and the major 
sources of descriptive information on plant pathogens. (Offered first summer session 1978 
and alt. years.) Grand 

PP 505 Histopathology. Preq.: PP 501 or equivalent. 2(1-3) F. Anatomical changes that oc- 
cur in diseased plant tissues will be studied. The appropriate procedures of microtechnique 
necessary for interpretation of pathological changes in plant tissues will be considered. 
Laboratory assignments will involve projects on specific diseases including photography and 
scientific writing. Milholland 

PP (MB, BO) 575 The Fungi. 3(3-0) F. (See botany, page 69.) 

PP (MB, BO) 576 The Fungi— Lab. 1(0-3) F. (See botany, page 69.) 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 219 

PP 595 Special Problems in Plant Pathology. Preq.: CI. Credits Arranged, Maximum 6. 
Investigation of special problems in plant pathology not related to a thesis problem. The in- 
vestigations may consist of original research and/or literature survey. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PP 604 Morphology and Taxonomy of Nematodes. Preqs.: PP 450, CI. 3(1-6) S. A study 
of the morphology, anatomy and taxonomy of nematodes with emphasis on the identification 
of important plant-parasitic genera. Exercises include preparation of semipermanent and 
permanent nematode mounts. (Offered 1980 and alt. years.) H. H. Triantaphyllou 

PP 605 Plant Virology. Preqs.: PP 315, GN 411, and a course in organic chemistry. 3(1-6) 
F. A study of plant viruses including effects on host plants, transmission, classification, 
methods of purification, determination of properties, chemical nature, structure and multipli- 
cation. (Offered in 1979 and alt. years.) Hebert, Gooding 

PP 608 History of Phytopathology. Preqs.: PP 315, CI. 1(1-0) F. Development of the 
science of phytopathology from its early beginnings to the early part of the 20th century. (Of- 
fered 1979 and alt. years.) Ellis 

PP 609 Current Phytopathological Research under Field Conditions. Preq.: Grad. 
standing. 2(1-3) S. Study of concepts involved, procedures used, and evaluation made in 
current phytopathological research by plant pathology staff. Visits to various research sta- 
tions will be made by the class. Clayton 

PP 611 Advanced Plant Nematology. Preq.: PP 604. 3(2-3) F. A study of the biology, 
physiology and ecology of plant parasitic nematodes with emphasis on mechanisms of 
pathogenesis, host responses to infection and population dynamics. Laboratory exercises in- 
cluding methods of cultivating nematodes, special physiological techniques and approaches 
used in ecological investigation. (Offered in 1978 and alt. years.) 

Barker, A. Triantaphyllou 

PP 612 Plant Pathogenesis. Preqs.: PP 500, CI. 3(2-3) F. Infection processes, alterations 
in photosynthesis, respiration, nitrogen metabolism, vascular function and growth regulator 
function are considered. The biochemical nature of the weapons utilized by pathogens in 
pathogenic attack and the defensive mechanisms employed by the hosts in resisting attack 
and the resultant dynamic interactions are studied. (Offered in 1979 and alt. years.) 

Huang 

PP 614 Nematode Development, Cytology and Genetics. Preq.; PP 604 or CI. 2(1-3) F. A 
study of embryogenesis, post-embryonic development, gametogenesis, cytology, reproduc- 
tion, sexuality, genetics and evolution of nematodes with emphasis on plant-parasitic forms. 
Laboratory exercises include small research projects in each area of study and demonstra- 
tions of techniques and materials. (Offered in 1978 and alt. years.) A. Triantaphyllou 

PP (BO) 625 Advanced Mycology. Preq.: PP 575 or CI. 4(2-6) F. An in-depth treatment 
of major groups of fungi. Aspects of taxonomy, nomenclature, developmental morphology, 
genetics, host-parasite relations, physiology, and ecology will be presented. Cardinal charac- 
teristics of selected fungi representing the major groups are determined. Field observations 
and collecting are also required. (Offered 1978 and alt. years.) Grand 



220 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

PP 650 Colloquium in Plant Pathology. Preq.: PP 502 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Group discussion of 
topics assigned by the instructor in order to develop a thorough understanding of basic con- 
cepts and their significance in the etiology, pathogenesis, epidemiology and control of plant 
diseases. The genesis and evolution of fundamental ideas and values and how new techniques 
and the acquisition of new knowledge influence the advancement of plant pathology and its 
various specialized fields are considered. (Offered 1980 and alt. years.) Cowling 

PP 690 Seminar in Plant Pathology. Preq.: Consent of seminar chairman. 1(1-0) F,S. Dis- 
cussion of assigned phytopathological topics. L. Lucas 

PP 699 Research in Plant Pathology. Preqs.: Grad. standing, CI. Credits Arranged. 
Original research in plant pathology. Graduate Staff 



Political Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor G. D. Garson, Head 

Professors: W. J. Block, F. V. Cahill Jr., A. Holtzman, R. O. Tilman; Professor 
Emeritus: J. T. Caldwell; Adjunct Professor: C. E. Caldwell; Associate Professors: 
J. H. Gilbert, H. G. Kebschull, J. P. Mastro, J. M. McClain, K. S. Petersen, M. S. 
Soroos, J. O. Williams; Assistant Professors: B. B. Clary, E. S. Fairchild, J. A. 
Hurwitz, T. E. Marshall, G. R. Rassel, E. R. Rubin, D. W. Stewart, J. E. Swiss, M. 
L. Vasu 

The Department of Political Science offers programs leading to the Master of 
Arts degree and the Master of Public Affairs degree. 

A candidate for admission to either program must have demonstrated an ap- 
titude for graduate study in political science; the student may also be required to 
take certain undergraduate courses to make up any deficiencies that may exist in 
the undergraduate record. 

The Master of Public Affairs degree requires completion of a 36-semester hour 
professional program for persons who are now or hope to be employed by govern- 
ment or by a government-related private enterprise or association. An internship 
in a government agency or a field paper for persons with previous public sector ex- 
perience is required. 

The program requires 27 hours to be selected from courses offered by the Depart- 
ment of Political Science. Students may concentrate either in administration, com- 
parative political development, or American political institutions and processes. 
The remaining hours may be taken in another discipline, such as economics and 
business, English, history, operations research, psychology, sociology or statistics. 
As an alternative the student may take the remaining hours in some area of 
technology, such as adult and community college education, water resources, civil 
engineering, or forestry. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 221 

Students who enroll in the program should have completed nine hours in the 
social sciences (including three in government) as undergraduates and have 
achieved a B average in the undergraduate major. 

The Master of Arts degree requires each candidate to complete 30 hours of 
graduate work. The candidate must concentrate (18-21 hours, including thesis) in 
two major fields in political science. Major fields are to be selected from the follow- 
ing: political theory, American politics, comparative politics, international rela- 
tions and public administration. A disciplinary minor of 9 to 12 hours outside the 
Department of Political Science is required. A student's work in a minor field must 
constitute a unified pattern and must contribute to one or both of the student's ma- 
jor fields. 

In either program each student will be assigned a graduate committee chairman 
for the preparation of a program of study which shall be subject to the approval of 
two other committee members, including one from outside the Department of 
Political Science. 

Scope and Method of Political Science (PS 571) is required of every candidate for 
both degrees as are comprehensive written and oral examinations. In addition, a 
candidate for the Master of Arts degree must demonstrate reading proficiency or a 
research skill in one modern language (normally German, French, Spanish or Rus- 
sian) and write a thesis in one of his or her major areas. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

PS 401 American Parties and Pressure Groups. 3(3-0) F. 

PS 402 Campaigns and Elections in the American Political System. Preq.: PS 201. 3(3- 
0) F,S. 

PS 406 Politics and Policies of American State Governments. 3(3-0) F.S, Sum. 

PS 408 Urban Politics in a Changing South. Preq.: Jr. standing. 3(3-0) F,S. 

PS 411 Public Opinion in Democracies. Preq.: Three hours of PS. 3(3-0) S. 

PS 431 International Organization. 3(3-0) F. 

PS 436 Politics of War and Peace. 3(3-0) F. 

PS 437 National Security Policy. Preq.: PS 331. 3(3-0) S.Sum. 

PS 446 Comparative Communist Systems. Preq.: PS 344 or 332. 3(3-0) F,S. 

PS 447 Political Development. Preq.: Six hours of PS. 3(3-0) F. 

PS 448 Politics of European Integration. Preq.: Six hours of comparative politics. 3(3-0) 
S. 

PS 461 Jurisprudence. Preq.: Jr. standing. 3(3-0) S. 

PS 498 Special Topics in Political Science. Preq.: Six hours of PS. 3-6 F.S. 



222 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PS 502 The Legislative Process. Preq.: PS 206 or CI. 3(3-0) S. A study of the formulation 
of public policy from the institutional and behavioral viewpoints. Important current 
legislative problems at the congressional and state legislative levels will be selected and will 
serve as a basis for analyzing the legislative process. Holtzman 

PS 506 American Constitutional Theory. Preq.: PS 271 or CI. 3(3-0) F. Basic con- 
stitutional doctrines, including fundamental law, judicial review, individual rights and 
political privileges, and national and state power. Special attention is given to the application 
of these doctrines to the regulation of business, agriculture and labor and to the rights 
safeguarded by the First, Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments to the Constitution. Cahill 

PS 507 Constitutional Theory II. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. or grad. standing. 3(3-0) 
F,S. A continuation of PS 506, but may be elected separately. An examination of leading con- 
stitutional cases, especially in the fields of civil liberties and individual rights, and the 
writings of leading commentators. Cahill 

PS 508 Urban Politics. Preq.: PS 206. 3(3-0) F,S. A comparative study of political condi- 
tions in cities and localities. Topics will include the formal structures and rules of city and 
metropolitan governments, and the relationships to the informal norms and distribution of 
power; patterns of local decision-making; elite recruitment and citizen participation; varia- 
tions of local autonomy and the scope of local politics; and approaches to urban policy issues. 

Clary 

PS 509 Problems in Urban and Metropolitan Area Government. Preq.: PS 206 or CI. 
3(3-0) S. This course examines theory and research on problems affecting governments in 
metropolitan areas. Principle attention is given to those problems which affect (or result 
from) governmental structure, institutions, and politics and to the alternative approaches to 
their solution. Clary 

PS 51 1 Public Administration. Preq.: PS 271 or CI. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. A study of the factors 
which contribute to goal displacement in public agencies and the institutions, concepts and 
techniques which may be used in such agencies to reduce the effects of these factors. 

Block, McClain, Rassel, Stewart, Swiss 

PS 512 Comparative Administration. Preq.: PS 511 or 346 or CI. 3(3-0) F,S. Concentra- 
tion will be on administrative systems of developing nations with limited attention to 
developed systems. The major emphasis will be on administrative aspects of governmental 
change and modernization in developing nations; colonial influence on administration; 
problems of establishing new nations and adapting to change in established states; 
bureaucratic development and behavior; theories of development administration. 

Graduate Staff 

PS 514 Public Finance. Preq.: EB 205. 3(3-0) F. A survey of the theories and practices of 
governmental taxing, spending, and borrowing, including intergovernmental relationships 
and administrative practices and problems. McClain 

PS 516 Public Policy Analysis. Preqs.: Grad. standing; advanced undergrad. standing 
and CI. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Course will focus on the theories and methodology of analyzing and 
explaining public policy and the substance of recent domestic policies in the human and 
physical resources area, including welfare, poverty, education, housing, urban renewal, 
transportation, recreation-conservation, and agriculture. Williams 

PS (SOC) 517 The Police Bureaucracy in a Democratic Society. Preq.: Sr. or grad. 
standing. 3(3-0) S. This is a political science seminar which focuses on the proposition that 
police departments are bureaucratic organizations which can be studied as such. Emphasis is 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 223 

placed on understanding the process by which police policy is made. Internal and external, 
psychological and structural variables are identified in tracing decisions on specific issues. 
Thus, attitudes of policemen, the nature of their work, and the resources and power of 
various constituencies are factors seen as determining police behavior. Graduate Staff 

PS 518 Organization Design. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. An examination of contem- 
porary approaches to organization design, including organization development, 
sociotechnical systems analysis, and various forms of organizational democratization rang- 
ing from human relations to self-management models. Issues in personal administration are 
emphasized in relation to public management. Garson 

PS 520 Environmental Policy. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. This course focuses on the 
formation and impact of environmental policy in the United States. Decision-making 
processes at all levels of government are examined. Comparisons are made between political, 
economic, social and technological policy alternatives. Emphasis is given to the application of 
policy analysis in environmental assessment and theoretical perspectives on the nature of 
the environmental crisis are considered. Clary 

PS 561 Political Thought: Plato to the Reformation. Preq.. CI. 3(3-0) F. The emergence 
and development of the theories underlying or explaining the political aspects of behavior, 
approached through the study of the writings of the principal political philosophers from the 
days of the Greek city-state to the Reformation. Marshall 

PS 562 Modern Political Theory. Preq.: CI. 3(3-0) S. A study of the state and its 
relationship to individuals and groups, approached through reading of selected passages 
from the works of outstanding philosophers from the 16th century to the present. 

Marshall 

PS 563 Power and Ideology. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. or grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. This 
course will explore competing theories of power and its distribution in the United States, and 
of the nature of ideology. It will analyze various forms of elite theory, particularly pluralist 
theory and its critics and of empirical democratic theory, with specific reference to the con- 
cepts of power and ideology. Primary attention will be given to the case of the United States, 
with projections made regarding the nature of power and ideology, and the prospects for 
democracy, in post-industrial societies. Hurwitz 

PS 565 American Political Thought. Preq.: Sr. or grad. standing. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. The 
course will examine and evaluate major American writings on the nature and purpose of 
politics. Readings will be grouped under the following topics: (1) various interpretations of 
the American Constitution and the principles embodied therein; (2) writings on civil and 
natural rights; (3) the character of American liberalism; ( 4 ) Black American political thought 
and (5) the contemporary crisis in liberal thought. The uurpose is to develop the independent 
capacity to read and reflect with care on the grow 'ferent views about American 

politics. Marshall 

PS 569 Topics in Political Theory. Preq.: Sr. or grad. standing (Maximum of 6 hours 
may be taken). 3(3-0) F,S. A close examination of particular topic a ista that are not 

included in the basic courses in political theory. Course content changes in different years, 
and, with permission of instructor, the course may be repeated for credit. Examples of course 
topics are: "Foundations of Modern Radicalism," "Twentieth Century Political Philosophy 
and Political Science," "Political Philosophy and the Problem of Law," and "Origins of 
Political Science." Marshall 

PS 571 Scope and Method of Politics. Preq.: PS 201 or CI. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. This course 
reviews contemporary theories, concepts and methods fundamental to the study of politics. 



224 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

It emphasizes current empirical research and the collateral involvement in research ac- 
tivities aimed at the development of basic skills in this area. 

Williams, Rassel, Clary, Vasu 

PS 590 Readings and Research. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F.S.Sum. To enable graduate 
students to pursue a subject of particular interest to them by doing extensive readings or 
research in that subject under direct, individual faculty supervision. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PS 601 Seminar in Party and Group Politics. Preq.: PS 401 or CI. 3(3-0) S. This course 
examines in depth such problems as mobilization of consent, recruitment of leaders, financ- 
ing and conduct of campaigns, nomination processes, interparty and intraparty politics, 
party-interest group relations and ideology, and party-interest group relations with govern- 
ment and public policy. Short research papers will be required, some of which will be presen- 
ted and evaluated in class. Holtzman 

PS 602 Seminar in Legislative Problems. Preq.: Grad. standing or CI. 3(3-0) S. This 
seminar considers basic problems characteristic of American legislative systems: develop- 
ment and maintenance for formal and informal rules of the game; relationships between out- 
side inputs (by parties, interest groups, constituents, executives, courts) and legislators; 
strategies and tactics of leadership; committee decision-making, roles and role behavior of 
legislators; bicameral and apportionment problems. Each student is required to do extensive 
reading, to interview legislators and those who seek to influence them and to prepare reports. 

Holtzman 

PS 604 The Chief Executive. Preq.: PS 271 or CI. 3(3-0) F.Sum. This course will focus 
upon three major concepts of the office of the chief executive, as developed under several in- 
cumbents. First are the institutions which surround that office and which facilitate the ex- 
pansion of its power and operations. Next are the various roles, which are played by different 
chief executives. Last are the processes of leadership by which the chief executive can at- 
tempt to direct the machinery of government to achieve predetermined objectives. 

Holtzman 

PS 608 Seminar in Urban Management. Preqs.: PS 516, PS 571 and PS 511 or equivalent. 
3(3-0) S. A seminar focusing on the analytical techniques and managerial principles required 
for policy formation and implementation in a complex urban governmental environment. 
Specific topics include: urban planning and community development, housing, in- 
tergovernmental relations, organizational roles and decision making, budgeting, and selected 
urban services (for example: police, transportation). Vasu, Williams 

PS 611 Public Personnel Administration. Preq.: PS 511 or CI. 3(3-0) Sum. A study of the 
institutions and the sequence of processes in public personnel administration. It examines 
existing practices but is primarily concerned with emerging theories and trends. 

Graduate Staff 

PS 612 The Budgetary Process. Preqs.: CI and at least nine hours in the social sciences 
including a course in American government. 3(3-0) S,Sum. A study of the generalized 
budgetary process used at all levels of government in the United States. Understanding of 
the process is based upon comprehension of the institutions involved, the roles of politicians 
and professionals, and the objectives of budgetary systems. The course will also focus upon 
budgetary reforms and the expanding Planning-Programming-Budgeting System as a 
management tool. McClain, Swiss 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 225 

PS 613 Government and Planning. Preq.: PS 511. 3(3-0) F.Sum. A study of the planning 
function at all levels of government in the United States, with particular attention to the 
problems posed for planning by the rapid growth of metropolitan areas. McClain, Vasu 

PS 614 Seminar in Management Systems. Preqs.: PS 571 or equivalent and completion 
of least one semester of full-time graduate work in MPA program or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. A 
special graduate-level seminar that is to be an integral part of the Master of Public Affairs 
Program in the Department of Political Science. The students in this seminar will study in 
detail the various management systems in use in the public administration field. Through 
case studies and applied methodology, students in the course apply management systems 
theory to practical problems in the public sector. Swiss 

PS 615 Seminar in Administrative Problems. Preq.: PS 511 or equivalent. 2-4. S, Sum. 
An advanced course in administrative principles and methods. Students will perform in- 
dividual or group research, under supervision in specific administrative topics within the 
context of those public agencies which function in their respective fields of technology. 

Block, McClain 

PS 616 Seminar in Program Evaluation. Preq.: PS 516 or CI. 3(3-0) S. The course will be 
concerned with program evaluation at various levels of government. The types, purposes, 
and applications of evaluation research as well as the development of evaluation procedures 
will be treated. Considerable emphasis will be placed on the application of methodologies to 
specific evaluation problems and particular programs. The development of evaluation 
procedures for use in particular agencies will be discussed at length. The importance of 
procedures to assess and improve the managerial and operational efficiency of programs as 
well as their output will also be covered. Rassell 

PS 617 Seminar in Organization Theory. Preq.: PS 511 or CI. 3(3-0) F,S. A seminar in 
which the students read, analyze, and discuss the original writings of some of the major 
theories of organizational structures and behavior. It will focus upon classical management 
theory, the human relations theories, and recent empirical and integrative organizational 
theories. Among the writers upon whose works the seminar will focus are Max Weber, Mary 
Parker Follett, Luther Gulick, Frederick Taylor, Elton Mayo, F. J. Roethlisberger, Chester 
Barnard, Herbert Simon, Amitai Etzioni, Robert Presthus, Victor Thompson, and Robert 
Golembiewski. Organization theories are based upon studies of both private and public 
organizations, so the literature of both areas is relevant. However, most of the emphasis 
upon current theories will focus on the public or governmental sector. Block, Stewart 

PS 618 Seminar in Policy and Administration. Preqs.: PS 511 and three additional hours 
in administration. 3(3-0) F. A seminar in theories and techniques of administration in ap- 
plied situations, using case study techniques. McClain 

PS 619 Intergovernmental Relations in the United States. Preqs.: PS 502 and PS 516. 
3(3-0) S. The course examines distinctive features of intergovernmental relations in the Un- 
ited States. Topics stressed include historical adaptations of federalism, the emerging role of 
the administrator, contemporary trends in intergovernmental relations, and assessment of 
contemporary trends from federal, state and local perspectives. Graduate Staff 

PS 621 Collective Negotiations in the Public Service. Preq.: PS 511 or CI. 3(3-0) Sum. 
This course includes intensive consideration of the background of the collective negotiations 
movement; analysis of key policy issues, such as bargaining rights and the use of strike 
weapons; framework for collective negotiations; scope and conduct of negotiations; impasse 
resolution; grievance procedure. Graduate Staff 



226 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

PS 641 Seminar in Comparative Politics. Preqs.: One course in comparative politics and 
one course in political science methodology or CI. 3(3-0) F.S. This seminar will open with a 
survey of the problems and methods of comparative political analysis, after which students 
will be assigned a specific, limited subject to be examined within the framework of a 
systematic, analytical scheme appropriate to the topic. Specific topics will be drawn from the 
subjects of political ideologies, political groups, political elites, and decision-making institu- 
tions and processes. Kebschull 

PS 691 Internship in Public Affairs. Preq.: Minimum 9 hrs. graduate work. 1-6 F.S.Sum. 
This course exposes the student to the environment and value system of the public organiza- 
tion through a supervised work experience. It involves the application of substantive 
knowledge and analytical skills to organizational problems. Credit will vary with the nature 
of the work experience. Graduate Staff 

PS 696 Seminar in Politics. Preq.: Advanced grad. standing. 2-4 F,S. An independent ad- 
vanced research course in selected problems of government and politics. The problems will be 
chosen in accordance with the needs and desires of the students registered for the course. 

Graduate Staff 

PS 699 Research in Politics. Preqs.: Grad. standing and approval of adviser. Credits 
Arranged. F.S. Research for writing of master's thesis. Graduate Staff 



Poultry Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor R. E. Cook, Head 

Professors: W. E. Donaldson, E. W. Glazener, P. B. Hamilton, C. H. Hill, J. B. 
Ward; Extension Professor: J. R. Harris; Associate Professors: J. D. Garlich, C. 
R. Parkhurst, W. R. Prince, J. P. Thaxton; Associate Professor Emeritus: W. L. 
Blow; Assistant Professors: F. W. Edens, K. K. Krueger, G. W. Morgan, J. Shih; 
Adjunct Associate Professor: N. Chernoff 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 

Professor: W. M. Colwell; Associate Professor: D. G. Simmons 

The Department of Poultry Science offers the Master of Science degree. Doctoral 
programs are offered in the disciplines of microbiology, physiology, genetics and 
nutrition. 

The department occupies Scott Hall, containing well-equipped laboratories, 
animal rooms and offices. Additional research facilities are located on the Univer- 
sity farms and the Piedmont Research Station. 

The Dearstyne Avian Health Center, a three-building complex, is used in connec- 
tion with special research projects related to disease resistance and treatment of 
various pathological conditions. The complex is made up of animal isolation rooms, 
biochemical laboratories and related facilities. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 227 

The research program is comprehensive and includes fundamental studies in 
nutrition, physiology, genetics, pathology and microbiology. In addition, investiga- 
tion of problems of more practical urgency is undertaken when appropriate. 

The demand for men and women with advanced training in poultry science is far 
greater than the supply. Opportunities exist for graduates in research in univer- 
sities, in government and in private industry. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

PO (VET) 401 Poultry Diseases. 4(3-3) S. 

PO 402 Commercial Poultry Enterprises. 4(3-3) S. 

PO (FS) 404 Poultry Products. Preq.: CH 220 or 221. 3(2-3) F. 

PO 405 Avian Physiology. Preq.: CH 220. 4(3-3) F. 

PO 410 Production and Management of Game Birds in Confinement. Preq.: PO 201. 
3(2-3) S. 

PO (ANS, NTR) 415 Comparative Nutrition. Preq.: CH 220 or 221. 3(3-0) F. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PO (GN) 520 Poultry Breeding. Preq.: GN 411. 3(2-2) S. Application of genetic principles 
to poultry breeding, considering physical traits and physiological characteristics. 

Krueger 

PO (ZO) 524 Comparative Endocrinology. Preq.: ZO 421 or equivalent. 4(3-3) S. Study of 
the endocrine system with respect to its physiological importance to metabolism, growth and 
reproduction. Prince 

PO (MB, PHY, VET) 552 Immunobiology. Preq.: MB 551. 3(2-3) S. A basic study of the 
ontogeny of immunobiological tissues and their subsequent roles in immunity. Primary 
emphasis will be on cell-mediated (T-cell) immunity and immunogenetics. Specific topics in- 
clude blood groups, histocompatibility antigens, organ transplantation, immunosuppression 
and tolerance. Some inter-relationships of other physiological systems with the immune 
system will be discussed. Morgan 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PO 698 Special Problems in Poultry Science. Preq.: Grad. standing. Maximum 6 F,S. 
Specific problems of study are assigned in various phases of poultry science. 

Graduate Staff 

PO 699 Poultry Research. Preq.: Grad. standing. Credits Arranged. F.S. A maximum of 
six credits is allowed towards a master's degree. Appraisal of present research; critical study 
of some particular problem involving original investigation. Problems in poultry breeding, 
nutrition, disease, endocrinology, hematology, microbiology or physiology. Graduate Staff 



228 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Product Design 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Associate Professor V. M. Foote, Program Director 

Professor: C. E. McKinney; Associate Professor: J. M. Wittkamp; Assistant 
Professors: A. V. Cooke, R. A. Donaldson, C. E. Joyner, J. W. Keely, C. R. Kieffer 

The product design program offers programs of study in product design leading 
to the Master of Product Design. 

All students with a four-year undergraduate degree shall be required to complete 
a minimum of 48 hours of course work of which approximately 70 percent will be in 
the major field and the remainder elected from various specialized areas. All stu- 
dents with a five-year undergraduate degree or equivalent professional experience 
shall be required to complete a minimum of 30 hours of course work of which ap- 
proximately 70 percent will be in the major field and the remainder elected from 
various specialized areas. 

The program of course work to be followed by the student and the terminal pro- 
ject are under the direction of the student's graduate committee. The terminal pro- 
ject shall continue the final test of the candidate's mastery of his or her design 
studies. The project shall be developed in the design studio or special projects 
framework in the final year and shall consist of an in-depth investigation of an ap- 
proved problem which relates product design studies to the student's minor field. 

Admission— Applicants for this program may come from the following sources: 
1) graduates of approved schools of product design, 2) graduates of approved 
programs of industrial design, 3) graduates of accredited schools of engineering, 4) 
graduates of accredited schools of architecture, 5) graduates of approved schools of 
visual design, and 6) under special circumstances, students with degrees in fields 
other than design. In these latter instances an advisory committee will evaluate the 
applicant's preparation with regard to design capabilities and professional com- 
petence. 

In addition, course offerings are available to any graduate student who can 
demonstrate reasonable competence or equivalent qualifications for prerequisites 
in the requested courses. 

All applicants, in addition to meeting the requirements of the Graduate School, 
must meet the special requirements of the product design program with regard to 
design capabilities and professional competence. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

PD 400 Intermediate Product Design (Series). Preq.: DF 102. 6(0-9) F,S. 

PD (T) 471 Introduction to Textile Design I. 3(2-2) S. 

PD (T) 472 Textile Design II Internship. Preq.: PD (T) 471. 3 Sum. 

PD (T) 473 Textile Design III. Preqs.: PD (T) 471/472. 3(2-2) F. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 229 

PVD 400 Intermediate Visual Design (Series). Preq.: DF 102. 6(0-9) F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PD 511 Materials and Processes V. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(2-2) F. Advanced studies in 
mass production processes and their influence on design and development of products. 
Emphasis is placed on material search and process selection in relation to cost, function, 
human factors, form, finishes and joining methods. An analysis of paper, wood, metal and 
manufacturing processes utilized in the production of mass-produced products. 

PD 512 Materials and Processes VI. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(2-2) S. Advanced studies in 
mass production processes and their influence on design and development of products. 
Emphasis is placed on material search and process selection in relation to cost, function, 
human factors, form, finishes and joining methods. An analysis of plastics and rubber and 
the related manufacturing processes utilized in the production of mass-produced products. 

PD 541, 542 Advanced Visual Design I, II. Preqs.: ARC 400, LAR 400, PD 400 and PVD 

400; waiver of prerequisite is at the discretion of the instructor. 6(3-9) F,S. Application of 
previous studies in design and visual communications to a wide variety of visual problems 
presented by our physical environment. 

PD (ARC, LAR) 571 Issues in Housing. 3(3-0) F. (See architecture, page 58.) 

PD 591 Special Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F,S. Seminars on subjects of current 
interest in design which are presented by persons not part of the regular faculty. 

PD 592 Special Topics. Preq.: Grad. standing. 2-3 F,S. Topics of current interest to the 
programs in the School of Design offered by faculty in the School. Subjects offered under 
this number are normally used to test and develop new courses. 

PD 595 Independent Study. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3 F.S.Sum. Special problems in 
various aspects of design developed under the direction of a faculty member on a tutorial 
basis. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PD 600 Advanced Product Design (Series). Preq.: PD 400 or grad. standing or CI. 6(0-12) 
F,S. Advanced studies in product design and development concerned with various 
social/economic age groups, various unlimited production systems, and various natural and 
synthetic materials. Special emphasis is given to problem identification, program formula- 
tion and application of advanced design methods. All problems will be of an individual 
nature. Approval for cooperative work must be secured from the instructor. 

PD 631, 632 Advanced Concepts in Product Engineering. Preqs.: PD 600, grad. 
standing. 3(3-0) F,S. Group investigation of advanced concepts in product design with 
emphasis on engineering. Engineering principles play an important role in the design of 
useful products. The scope of this course will include mass movement of persons as well as 
the designs of consumer products. The field of transportation and consumer products are 
fast changing to satisfy the needs of the present and future generations. The product 
designer is to be made aware of these needs by special investigations into future technologies 
and future material developments. 

PD 690, 691 Special Tppics in Product Design. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-6 F,S. An in- 
vestigation of special topics in product/visual design of a particular interest to advanced stu- 
dents under the direction of a faculty member on a tutorial basis. Credits and contents will 
vary with each student. 



230 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Psychology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor: P. W. Thayer, Head 

Professors: H. M. Corter, J. W. Cunningham, D. W. Drewes, J. C. Johnson, T. E. 
LeVere, H. G. Miller, S. E. Newman, R. G. Pearson, J. L. Wasik, B. W. 
Westbrook; Professor Emeritus: K. L. Barkley; Associate Professors: J. L. Cole, 
J. E. R. Luginbuhl, D. H. Mershon, R. F. Rawls, F. J. Smith, Adjunct Associate 
Professors: B. C. Ball, B. F. Corder, B. A. Norton, R. W. Oppenheim, M. N. 
Wiebe; Associate Professor Emeritus: J. W. Magill; Assistant Professors: D. L. 
Chmielewski, V. G. Cowgell, P. D. Green, J. W. Kalat, K. W. Klein, L. S. Taylor; 
Adjunct Assistant Professor: C. L. Kronberg, L. D. Silber 

The Department of Psychology offers courses of study leading to the Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Specialization in experimental psy- 
chology, ergonomics, social psychology, school psychology and human resource 
development is available. 

A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate credit is required for the master's 
degree. Though no minimum number of additional hours is required for the doc- 
toral degree, the student may expect to take 30 or more additional semester hours 
of graduate credit. The actual graduate program for each master's and doctoral 
student is determined on the basis of individual needs, interests and accomplish- 
ments. Admission requirements for the beginning graduate student in psychology 
are: satisfactory grades in all undergraduate work and at least a "B" average in un- 
dergraduate psychology courses and in the undergraduate major; satisfactory 
scores on the Graduate Record Examination including the Advanced Test in psy- 
chology and the Miller Analogies Test; and three satisfactory letters of recommen- 
dation in regard to quality of work and character. It is possible to enter the 
program without undergraduate coursework in psychology, but some preparation 
in experimental psychology, statistics and mathematics is desirable. 

Admission requirements for students already possessing the master's degree 
who wish to obtain the doctorate in psychology are: a minimum of a "B" average in 
their graduate work and a substantial background in psychology or related fields; 
satisfactory grades in undergraduate studies; satisfactory scores on the Graduate 
Record Examination including the Advanced Test in psychology (if the applicant's 
master's degree is in a field other than psychology, he should also submit the Ad- 
vanced Test score in that field and the Miller Analogies Test score); and three 
satisfactory letters of recommendation in regard to quality of work and character. 

A limited number of research and teaching assistantships and fellowships are 
available to qualified graduate students. The assistantships are usually based on 
one-third time assignments but are occasionally for one-half time. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

PSY 475 Child Psychology. Preq.: PSY 200 or 304. 3(3-0) F,S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 231 

PSY 476 Psychology of Adolescent Development. Preq.: Jr. standing. 3(3-0) F,S. 
PSY 491 Research Methods in Psychology. Preq.: PSY 200. 3(3-0) F,S. 
FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PSY 500 Perception. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(2-2) F. A survey of the anatomy and 
physiology of the visual system and their relationship to such processes as sensory adapta- 
tion, binocularity, and color vision. Modern quantitative approaches to the problems of detec- 
tion, discrimination, and psychophysical scaling. Examination of the chief determiners of 
visual perception, including both stimulus variables and such organismic variables as learn- 
ing, motivation, and attention. The discussion of perceptual theory and processes will 
emphasize several topics in two- and three-dimensional spatial perception. Mershon 

PSY 502 Physiological Psychology. Preq.: Twelve hours of PSY including PSY 200, 300, 
310. 3(3-0) F. First of two sequence series concerned with the physiological foundations of 
behavior. The emphasis in this first course is basic vertebrate neuroanatomy and 
neurophysiology. LeVere 

PSY 504 Advanced Educational Psychology. Preq.: Six hours of PSY. 3(3-0) F.S. A 
critical appraisal of current psychological findings that are relevant to educational practice 
and theory. Johnson 

PSY 505 History and Systems of Psychology. Preqs.: PSY 200, 300, 310, 320 or CI or 
grad. status. 3(3-0) S. The aim of this course is to acquaint students with the history of psy- 
chology and psychological systems and to give students some practice in taking different ap- 
proaches to a particular problem area. Cole 

PSY 510 Learning and Motivation. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. A systematic 
analysis of some of the major classes of variables determining behavioral change. Learning 
variables are analyzed within their primary experimental setting, and emphasis is upon the 
diversity of the functions governing behavior change rather than upon the development of 
some comprehensive theory. Both learning and motivational variables are examined as they 
contribute to changes in performance within the experimental setting. Cole 

PSY 511 Advanced Social Psychology. Preq.: Grad. standing or CI. 3(3-0) F. A survey of 
theory and research in social psychology through reading and discussion of primary source 
materials. In addition, the course will deal with issues of methodology, ethical questions in 
social psychological research and application of research findings to the world at large. 

Klein, Luginbuhl, Smith 

PSY 514 Logical Foundations of Behavioral Analysis. Preq.: Grad. standing in PSY. 
3(3-0) F. An analysis of fundamental considerations involved in the formulation and verifica- 
tion of theories of behavior. The objectives are to provide insight into the nature of scientific 
research, to foster the ability to derive empirical hypotheses, to develop facility in designing 
experimental tests of hypotheses, and to promote effective writing and speaking about psy- 
chological theory and experimentation. Westbrook 

PSY 520 Cognitive Processes. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(2-2) F. This course will emphasize 
the results from research on a number of complex processes (e.g., remembering, concept 
learning, problem solving, acquisition and use of language) and the theories that have been 
proposed to explain these results. Newman 

PSY 530 Abnormal Psychology. Preqs.: PSY 200, 302. 3(3-0) S. The causes, symptomatic 
behavior and treatment of the major personality disturbances. Emphasis on theory, ex- 
perimental psychopathology and preventive measures. Corter, Green 



232 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

PSY (ED) 531 Mental Retardation. 3(3-0) F,Sum. (See education courses, page 105.) 

PSY 532 Psychological Aspects of Exceptionality. Preq.: CI. 3(3-0) S.Sum. The course is 
designed to give consideration to effects of severe deficiency (sensory, physical, mental, etc.) 
arising from any causes at any stage of life; the personal and social ramifications of these; 
and possible courses of intervention; as well as utilization of psychological theory and clinical 
information in interpreting probable implications. Research findings related to sensory 
deprivation, research needs and possible research projects will be discussed. Rawls 

PSY 535 Tests and Measurements. Preq.: Six hours of PSY. 3(3-0) F,S. A study of the 
principles of psychological testing including norms and units of measurement, elementary 
statistical concepts, reliability and validity. In addition, some attention is devoted to the ma- 
jor types of available tests such as general intellectual development, tests of separate 
abilities, achievement tests, measures of personality and interest inventories. Westbrook 

PSY (IE) 540 Human Factors in Systems Design. Preq.: IE (PSY) 338 or IE 354; Coreq.: 
ST 507 or 515. 3(3-0) S. Introduction to problems of the systems development cycle, including 
man-machine function allocation, military specifications, display-control compatibility, the 
personnel sub-system concept and maintainability design. Detailed treatment is given to 
man as an information processing mechanism. Pearson 

PSY 545 Fundamentals of Skill. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) Alt. F. Fundamentals of 
human perceptual, cognitive and sensory-motor abilities that are basic to skilled perfor- 
mance. Treatment of such topics as channel capacity, short-term memory, stress, fatigue, 
arousal theory, task taxonomy, skill acquisition, proficiency decrement, information feed- 
back and performance analysis. Problems of attention, search, monitoring, tracking, com- 
plex tasks, and skill maintenance. Pearson 

PSY 565 Organizational Psychology. Preq.: Nine hours of PSY. 3(3-0) S. A study of the 
application of behavioral science, particularly psychology and social psychology, to 
organizational and management problems. Miller 

PSY 570 Theories of Personality. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) F. A review of theories of 
personality, with emphasis on research, application in psychotherapy and measurement, 
principles involved in similarities and differences among them and development of a per- 
sonal model. Corter 

PSY 571 Individual Intelligence Measurement. Preq.: PSY 570. 3(3-0) S. A practicum in 
individual intelligence testing with emphasis on the Wechsler Bellevue, Stanford-Binet, 
report writing and case studies. Green 

PSY 575 Behavior Modification. Preqs.: Grad. standing, PSY 510 or equivalent and/or 
CI. 3(2-2) S. The course will deal with the application of behavior modification techniques. 
Balanced emphasis will be placed upon theoretical foundations, ethical considerations, ac- 
quisition of skills, and practicum experiences. Specifically, course content will consist of 
methods of applying laws derived from the psychology learning laboratory such as reinforce- 
ment schedules, contingency specifications and objective behavioral analyses to the solution 
of behavioral problems in practical situations. Enrollment limited to 12 students; priority (1) 
community/clinical and school psychology, (2) other psychology graduate students. 

Graduate Staff 

PSY 576 Developmental Psychology. Preq.: Nine hours of PSY, including PSY 475 or 
PSY 476. 3(3-0) F. A survey of the role of growth and development in human behavior, par- 
ticularly during the child and adolescent periods. This course will pay particular attention to 
basic principles and theories in the area of developmental psychology. Rawls, Corter 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 233 

PSY 578 Individual Differences. Preq.: Six hours of PSY. 3(3-0) F,S. The objective and 
quantitative investigation of individual differences in behavior. The course deals with the 
following questions: What is the nature and extent of individual differences? What can be 
discovered about their causes? How are the differences affected by training, growth, and 
physical conditions? In what manner are the differences in various traits related to one 
another, or organized? Westbrook 

PSY 592 Area Seminar in Experimental Psychology. Preq.: Grad. standing in PSY. 1-3, 
Maximum 6 F,S. The following topics will be dealt with: (1) the development of experimental 
psychology as an area of inquiry, (2) methods of inquiry, (3) contemporary issues, (4) ethical 
questions, (5) relationship to other areas within psychology. Graduate Staff 

PSY (IE) 593 Area Seminar in Ergonomics. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(0-2), Maximum 3. 
F. Introduction to ergonomics as an area of study; historical aspects; contemporary issues; 
ethical questions; overview of campus research, facilities and courses in the area; considera- 
tion of information sources, financial support for research proposals and employment oppor- 
tunities. Pearson 

PSY 594 Area Seminar in Human Resources Development. Preq.: CI. 1-3, Maximum 6. 
F,S. The following topics will be dealt with: (1) human resources development as an area of 
inquiry, (2) methods of inquiry, (3) contemporary issues, (4) ethical questions, (5) 
relationship to other areas within psychology. Graduate Staff 

PSY 595 Area Seminar in School Psychology. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3, Maximum 6. 
F,S. The following topics will be dealt with: (1) the development of school psychology as a 
professional area, (2) methods of inquiry, (3) scientific and theoretical bases, (4) contem- 
porary issues, (5) ethical questions, (6) relationship to other areas within psychology. 

Graduate Staff 

PSY 596 Area Seminar in Social Psychology. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3, Maximum 6 
F,S. This course will deal with the following topics: (1) a survey of areas within social psy- 
chology, (2) methods of inquiry, (3) contemporary issues, (4) ethical questions, (5) the relation 
of social psychology to other branches of psychology, to other disciplines, and to society and 
its problems. Graduate Staff 

PSY 599 Research Problems in Psychology. Preq.: CI. Credits Arranged. F,S. Research 
project for graduate students supervised by members of the graduate faculty. Research to be 
elected on basis of interest of student, and is not to be part of thesis or dissertation research. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PSY 602 Physiological Psychology. Preq.: PSY 502 and/or CI. 3(3-0) S. PSY 602 is the 
sequel to PSY 502 and will concentrate on relating the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology 
studied in PSY 502 to overt observable behaviors such as sleep-walking, motivation-emotion, 
and reflexive and learned behaviors. LeYere 

PSY 603 Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior. Preqs.: PSY 510, 514. 3(3-0) S. This 
seminar will provide the opportunity for exploring in depth problems and issues in verbal 
learning and memory, concept learning, problem solving, psycholinguistics and other areas 
of cognition. Newman 

PSY 605 Instrumental Learning. Preqs.: PSY 510, 514. 3(3-0) S. A systematic analysis of 
various experimental techniques and alternative data languages for the study of instrumen- 
tal learning. Primary orientation will be upon what is happening in the experimental situa- 
tion rather than upon theoretical explanations of the data. Special problems— for example, 



234 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

discrimination, avoidance chaining and reinforcement schedules — will be studied in depth. 
Various models for description of the data will be compared with special emphasis upon 
mathematical learning models. Cole 

PSY 607 Advanced Industrial Psychology I. Preqs.: Nine hours of PSY and ST or con- 
current with statistics. 3(3-0) F. Application of scientific methods to the measurement and 
understanding of industrial behavior. Drewes 

PSY 608 Advanced Industrial Psychology II. Preq.: PSY 607. 3(3-0) S. Application of 
scientific methods to the measurement and understanding of industrial behavior. 

Drewes 

PSY 610 Theories of Learning. Preqs.: PSY 510, 514. 3(3-0) F, S. The objectives of this 
course are to promote learning of the theories currently used to explain how learning and 
forgetting occur so that testable consequences of these theories can be derived and so that the 
theories and their testable consequences are capably written and spoken about. Cole 

PSY 611 Social Psychology: Small Groups Research. Preq.: PSY 511. 3(3-0) S. Surveys 
the literature and research pertaining to social psychological processes in and between 
groups. Course content includes basic principles of group formation, role differentiation, 
communication, influence, norms, social exchange, equity, cooperation/conflict, decision 
making, and pro-social behavior. Environmental factors affecting group behavior are also 
considered. In conjunction with each substantive topic, the suitable methodologies for 
research are considered. Smith 

PSY 635 Psychological Measurement. Preqs.: ST 507, 511 or equivalent, 12 hours of PSY. 
3(3-0) F. Theory of psychological measurement. Statistical problems and techniques in test 
construction. Cunningham 

PSY (IE) 640 Skilled Operator Performance. Preqs.: PSY 545, ST 507, or ST 515. 3(3-0) 
F. Theories of the human operator are considered with regard to the classical problems of 
monitoring, vigilance and tracking. Factors such as biological rhythm. Sleep loss, sensory 
restriction, environmental stress and timesharing are considered as they interact with and 
determine overall systems efficiency. (Offered in alt. years.) Pearson 

PSY 672 Personality Measurement. Preqs.: PSY 570, 571. 3(2-3) S. Theory and practicum 
in individual personality testing of child and adults with emphasis on projective techniques, 
other personality measures, report writing and case studies. Corter, Green 

PSY 674 Psychological Intervention I. Preq.: PSY 672, 530 and CI. 3(2-2) F. This course is 
designed to examine theories, research, techniques, ethics and professional responsibilities 
related to approaches to psychological intervention. Types of psychological intervention to be 
studied will include behavior modification, milieu approaches, crisis intervention techniques 
and group process methods, in addition to more intensive relationship approaches. A close in- 
tegration of experiences, content and supervision will be emphasized in a variety of 
professional settings with a wide range of personal problems and age groups. Cowgell 

PSY 675 Psychological Intervention II. Preq.: PSY 674. 3(2-2) S. The primary purpose of 
this course is to provide students opportunities to acquire information, conceptual 
frameworks, interpersonal skills and a sense of ethical responsibility, all of which are basic 
to their further development as practicing psychologists. A major effort in the course is 
made to help the student increase his interpersonal skills as a means of promoting the psy- 
chological growth and effectiveness of others. Cowgell 

PSY 690 Seminar in Industrial Psychology. 3(3-0) F,S. Scientific articles, analysis of ex- 
perimental designs in industrial psychology and study of special problems of interest to 
graduate students in industrial psychology. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 235 

PSY 691 Special Topics in Psychology. Preqs.: Grad. standing, CI. 1-3 F,S. Course will 
provide opportunity for exploration in depth of advanced topical areas which, because of 
their degree of specialization, are not generally involved in other courses; for example, mul- 
tivariate methodology in psychology, computer simulation, mathematical model building. 
Some new 600-level courses will first be offered under this title during the developmental 
phase and as such may involve lectures and/or laboratories. Graduate Staff 

PSY 693 Psychological Clinic Practicum. Preq.: Nine hours in PSY. Maximum 12 F,S. 
Clinical participation in interviewing, counseling, psychotherapy and administration of psy- 
chological tests. Practicum to be concerned with adults and children. Corter 

PSY 696 Advanced Problems in Perception. Preqs.: PSY 500, 514. 3(2-2) S. Advanced 
topics in perception will be the subject matter of this course. Topics will include a survey and 
analysis of contemporary trends in perceptual research and theory. Mershon 

PSY (ED) 697 Advanced Seminar in Research Design. Preqs.: Nine hours of statistical 
methods and research or CI, advanced grad. status. 3(3-0) S. This course will be designed as a 
seminar-type course, with topics selected each semester in accordance with the interests and 
needs of the students. Attention will be given to the research strategies that underlie 
educational and psychological research, to the development of theoretical constructs, to a 
critical review of research related to problems in which the students are interested, and to a 
systematic analysis and critique of research problems in which the students are engaged. 

Graduate Staff 

PSY 699 Thesis and Dissertation Research. Preqs;: Grad. standing, CI. Credits 
Arranged. F,S. Individual or group research problems; a maximum of six credits is allowed 
toward the master's degree, but any number toward the Ph.D. degree. Graduate Staff 



Recreation Resources Administration 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor T. I. Hines, Head 

Professors: W. E. Smith, R. E. Sternloff, M. R. Warren; Associate Professors 
Emeriti: G. A. Hammon, L. L. Miller; Assistant Professors: D. L. Erickson, P. K. 
McKnelly, C. D. Siderelis; Visiting Assistant Professor: L. E. Abbas; Adjunct 
Assistant Professors: H. K. Cordell, Hugh A. Devine 

The Department of Recreation Resources Administration offers programs of 
study leading to the Master of Science and Master of Recreation Resources degrees. 
The programs are based on an interdisciplinary approach and are designed to meet 
the problems and opportunities posed by changing social forces which affect the 
rcreation profession. Students pursuing these degrees will have an opportunity to 
develop an understanding of the relationship between recreation and disciplines 
such as forestry, wildlife management, horticulture, landscape design, conserva- 
tion, economics and business, politics, sociology and anthropology. 

The Master of Science degree is designed to enhance in advanced students 
scholarly development and a more adequate comprehension of the requirements 
and responsibilities essential for independent research. A student will be required 



236 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

to complete a minimum of 30 hours of graduate work. The program will consist of a 
major and minor field of study. The minor may be concentrated wholly in a dif- 
ferent discipline or may consist of courses selected from the offering of two depart- 
ments. In either case, the minor field must constitute a unified pattern and must 
contribute to the student's education in the major field. A high degree of flexibility 
is maintained to permit each student's program to be structured to meet individual 
needs. 

Each candidate for the Master of Science degree will be required to complete a 
thesis representing an original investigation as a part of the minimum require- 
ments for the degree. 

The Master of Recreation Resources degree is designed for students who are in- 
terested in the more advanced applications of administrative principles in 
specialized areas of the recreation field. Students for this degree will usually ter- 
minate their graduate program upon completion of the master's degree. Require- 
ments for the Master of Recreation Resources degree include a minimum of 36 
hours of course work. In lieu of a thesis the student will be required to complete a 
departmental course in research and a problem report. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

RRA 442 Wildland Recreation Environments. Preq.: Jr. standing. 3(2-3) F,S. 

RRA 451 Facility and Site Planning. Preqs.: RRA 215 and 216. 3(0-6) F,S. 

RRA 453 Administrative Policies and Procedures. Preq.: RRA 359. 3(3-0) F,S. 

RRA 454 Recreation and Park Finance. Preqs.: Six hours of RRA courses, sr. standing. 
3(3-0) F,S. 

RRA 475 Recreation and Park Internship. Preqs.: Sr. standing. RRA 359. 9(0-27) (9 
weeks) S, Sum. 

RRA 491 Special Problems in Recreation. Preq.: Consent of department. 3(2-2) F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

RRA 500 Theories of Leisure and Recreation. Preq.: Nine hours of RRA courses. 3(3-0) 
F. Analysis of leisure and recreation and a study of their origin and development as revealed 
by man's behavioral patterns. Interpretation of the influence and social significance of 
leisure and recreation concepts on contemporary American culture and their implications on 
future recreation thought and action. Warren 

RRA 501 Theory Development in Recreation Research. Preq.: ST 311 and SOC 416. 4(3- 
2) F. Review of the historical emphasis on recreation research with analyses of various ap- 
proaches to research design and model building. Examination of the philosophy of social 
scientific investigation, and possible application of existing behavioral theory to recreation 
research with a special emphasis on efforts to develop theory useful in explaining use of 
leisure time. Siderlis 

RRA (EB) 503 Economics of Recreation. Preq.: EB 301 or 401. 3(3-0) F. The principal 
emphasis will be on identity and importance of economic information for planning. The 
market mechanism and government will be examined as they affect and interact to affect 
allocation of resources to recreation, distribution of recreation services, and behavior of 
recreationists. Other topics include demand analysis, economics of planning, cost/benefit 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 237 

analysis, secondary economic impacts, public decision-making, externalities, public finance, 
and supply considerations in urban and rural recreation situations. Abbas 

RRA 504 Recreation and Park Data Systems. Preqs.: CSC 200, ST 311; Coreq.: RRA 453. 
3(3-0) S. This course includes the analysis of such topics as the identification of maintenance, 
operation, and service delivery work areas in recreation and park agencies for system ap- 
plications; development of reporting structures and report generation; recreation and main- 
tenance activity scheduling; system monitoring; forms design and control; system implemen- 
tation, and system evaluation. Siderelis 

RRA 538 Recreation for Special Populations. 3(3-0) S. Emphasis on the leisure concerns 
of deprived groups with exposure to the status, problems, and community service needs of 
special populations found in most American communities. Special populations include the 
physically disabled, the mentally retarded, the aging, and the economically deprived. 

Sternloff 

RRA 591 Recreation Resources Problems. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. or grad. status. 
1-4 F,S. Assigned or selected problems in the field of recreation administration, planning, 
supervision, maintenance, operations, financing, or program. Special research problems 
selected on basis of interest of students and supervised by members of the graduate faculty. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

RRA 691 Seminar in Recreation Administrative Policies. Preq.: RRA 501 or equivalent. 
2(0-4) S. Advanced course in administrative principles; students do individual and group 
research, under supervision, in specific administrative categories of study in the field of 
recreation. Independent study and research required of students who must develop written 
and oral presentations for critical analysis by graduate students and faculty. Siderelis 

RRA 692 Advanced Problems in Recreation. Preq.: Twelve hours of RRA courses. 
Credits Arranged. F,S. Directed research in a specialized phase of recreation other than a 
thesis problem. Graduate Staff 

RRA 699 Research in Recreation. Preq.: Twelve hours of RRA courses. Credits 
Arranged. F,S. Original research preliminary to writing a master's thesis. 

Graduate Staff 



Sociology and Anthropology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor S. C. Mayo, Head 

Professors: L. W. Drabick, G. C. McCann, C. P. Marsh, M. M. Sawhney, M. E. 
Voland, J. N. Young; Professor Emeritus: H. D. Rawls; Associate Professors: R. 
C. Brisson, W. B. Clifford, A. C. Davis, C. V. Mercer, R. L. Moxley, R. D. 
Mustian— Graduate Administrator, G. S. Nickerson, E. M. Suval, O. Uzzell, R. C. 
Wimberly; Extension Associate Professors: V. E. Hamilton, C. E. Lewis; 
Assistant Professors: H. L. Adkins, W. T. Austin, J. E. Burton, C. G. Dawson, 
R. L. Delia Fave, V. A. Hiday, T. M. Hyman, P. T. McFarlane, J. G. Peck, M. D. 
Schulman, M. L. Walek, J. M. Wallace, M. T. Zingraff 



238 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology offers programs of study in 
sociology leading to the advanced degrees of Master of Sociology, Master of Science, 
and Doctor of Philosophy. The curriculum includes several major areas of concen- 
tration: community and area development, demography, planned change, social 
change and development, and deviancy and rehabilitiation. The core program in- 
cludes sociological theory, research methods and quantitative analysis. Special at- 
tention is given in the curriculum to the development of sociological skills involved 
in analyzing social factors and public policies as they affect community, regional, 
national and international development. 

The department also offers a minor in cultural anthropology at the Master's 
level. Graduate courses are designed to provide a broad background in major con- 
cepts of cultural anthropology with emphasis on theory. The student may supple- 
ment these offerings with courses in geographic areas and methodology at the 400 
level. 

Graduate students on assistantships and fellowships are usually provided with of- 
fice space and equipment. Computer facilities are available for students whose 
research problems involve extensive analyses and data as well as for those students 
who want to learn to do their own programming. Computer facilities available to 
students and faculty in the department are described on page 18. 

The department has the responsibility for a state-wide program in community 
and area development which provides a research laboratory for interested graduate 
students. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

ANT 405 Indians of North America. Preq.: Six hours ANT and/or SOC. 3(3-0) F. 

ANT 406 Peoples and Cultures of South America. Preq.: Six hours ANT and/or SOC. 
3(3-0) S. 

ANT 416 Field Methods in Cultural Anthropology. Preq.: Six hours ANT. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ANT 420 Biological Bases for Human Social Behavior. Preq.: ANT 251, or BS 100 or 
105, or GN 301, or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. 

ANT 498 Special Topics in Anthropology. Preq.: Six hours of SOC/ ANT. 1-6 F,S. 

SOC 402 Urban Sociology. Preq.: SOC 202. 3(3-0) F,S. 

SOC 410 Formal Organizations. Preq.: SOC 202. 3(3-0) S. 

SOC 414 Social Class. Preq.: SOC 202. 3(3-0) F. 

SOC 415 Social Thought. Preq.: SOC 202. 3(3-0) F,S. 

SOC 416 Research Methods. Preqs.: Sr. standing, ST 311, or CI. 3(3-0) F,S. 

SOC 418 Analysis of School-Community Relations. Preq.: SOC 202, or 318, or 311, or ED 
344. 3(2-2) S. 

SOC 420 Sociology of Corrections. Preqs.: SOC 306 and PS 311. 3(1-2) S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 239 

SOC 425 Juvenile Delinquency. Preq.: SOC 202, SOC 301 desirable. 3(3-0) F,S. 

SOC 441 Social Change in Asia. Preq.: SOC 202. 3(1 Vfe-1 Vfe) F. 

SOC 490 Senior Seminar in Sociology. Preq.: Consent of department. 3(3-0) F,S. 

SOC 498 Special Topics in Sociology. Preq.: Six hours SOC above the freshman level. 1-6 
F,S 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ANT 501 Advanced Survey of Cultural Anthropology. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. 
An intensive examination of the field of cultural anthropology. As a foundation course for 
subsequent graduate work in anthropology, emphasis will be placed on main currents in 
anthropological thinking and research. Graduate Staff 

ANT 505 Comparative Social Organization. Preq.: ANT 501 or 6 hours in Cultural 
Anthropology. 3(3-0) F. This course will focus on an analysis of forms of social organization 
in both technologically simple and complex societies from several analytical perspectives. 
Discussion of kinship theory: the relationship of social organization to systems such as the 
economic, political, and religious; and an examination of modern development in social 
organization research will be stressed. Wallace 

ANT 508 Culture and Personality. Preq.: ANT 501 or 6 hours in Cultural Anthropology. 
3(3-0) S. The course focuses on the interplay between cultural norms and the enculturation 
process. From a cross-cultural perspective, it examines the process by which cultural norms 
are transmitted and learned, as well as the effect of culture change on the individual. The 
historical development of the field as well as contemporary trends are also discussed in both 
theoretical and applied contexts. Nickerson 

ANT 511 Anthropological Theory. Preqs.: ANT 501 or 6 hours in Cultural Anthropology. 
3(3-0) F. Approaches theory from both an historical and contemporary point of view. 
Emphasizes the key anthropological concept of culture and its significance for understanding 
man and his works. Graduate Staff 

ANT 512 Applied Anthropology. Preq.: ANT 252 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Includes a review of the 
historical development of applied anthropology and a study of anthropology as applied in 
government, industry, community development, education and medicine. The processes of 
cultural change are analyzed in terms of the application of anthropological techniques to 
programs of developmental change. Peck 

ANT 591 Special Topics in Anthropology. Preq.: ANT 501 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F.S. This 
course is designed to provide the opportunity for students to investigate in depth some par- 
ticular topic in anthropology. Course content and mode of study will vary, reflecting current 
student needs and interests. Topics will be determined by the faculty member(s) and student. 

Graduate Staff 

SOC (ED) 501 Leadership. Preq.: SOC 202 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F.S. Leadership in 
various fields of American life; analysis of factors associated with it; techniques of 
leadership. Stresses recreational, scientific and executive leadership procedures. Young 

SOC 502 Society, Culture and Personality. Preq.: SOC 202 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Studies human personality from its origins in primary groups through its development in 
secondary contacts and its ultimate integration with social norms. Explores comparative 
anthropological materials but places emphasis on the normal personality and individual ad- 
justment to our society and culture. Dynamics of personality and character structure 
analyzed in terms of society's general culture patterns and social institutions. Uzzell 



240 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

SOC 503 Contemporary Sociology. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) F,S. An overview of the 
current status of sociological theory and research. Introduction to contemporary sociological 
thinking and research. Marsh 

SOC 504 Education in Modern Society. Preqs.: SOC 202, 301 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Places varying emphasis on the historical development of education in the United States, 
cross-cultural comparisons of educational structure and function, professionalization of 
educators, investigation of the ecological factors affecting education, effects of group 
processes upon learning, and the effects of social processes and changes upon the educational 
institution. Drabick 

SOC 505 The Sociology of Rehabilitation I. Preq.: Grad. standing and/or CI. 3(3-0) F. 
The area of disability and handicap is introduced from a conceptual and theoretical 
standpoint. Sociological and social-psychological aspects of handicaps, the rehabilitation 
processes and rehabilitative organizations are stressed. Emphasizes rehabilitation of the 
sociology of work in the rehabilitation processes. Sociocultural factors in disability and han- 
dicap (residence, social class, family relationships, etc.) are analyzed. Graduate Staff 

SOC 506 The Sociology of Rehabilitation II. Preq.: Grad. standing and/or CI. 3(3-0) S. 
Students engage in individual research projects on a specific handicap, a rehabilitation 
process or a rehabilitative agency or subagency. Lectures and discussions furnish perspective 
concerning rehabilitation work in process while student pursues a specialized interest. 
Emphasizes sociological methods and techniques applicable to above aspects of social 
behavior. Graduate Staff 

SOC 507 Social Movements. Preq.: SOC 503 or 6 hours of SOC or social psychology. 3(3-0) 
S. Major topics include: the nature and variety of social movements; conditions affecting the 
emergence of social movements; the structure of social movements; and the relationship be- 
tween social movements, social conflict, and social change. While the primary emphasis will 
be conceptual and theoretical, a number of social movements both past and contemporary 
will be examined within this framework. Similarly, research issues relative to social move- 
ments will be examined. Graduate Staff 

SOC 509 Population Problems. Preq.: SOC 202 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. Examines pop- 
ulation growth, rates of change and distribution. Emphasizes functional roles of population, 
i.e., age, sex, race, residence, occupation, marital status, and education. Population dynamics 
are stressed: fertility, mortality and migration. Population policy is analyzed in relation to 
national and international goals stressing a world view. Clifford 

SOC 510 Industrial Sociology. Preq.: SOC 202 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. Industrial rela- 
tions are analyzed as group behavior with a complex and dynamic network of rights, obliga- 
tions, sentiments and rules. This social system is viewed as an interdependent part of total 
community life. The background and functioning of industrialism are studied as social and 
cultural phenomena and its social problems are analyzed. Mercer 

SOC 511 Sociological Theory. Preqs.: Six hours SOC and grad. standing or CI. 3(3-0) F,S. 
The interdependence of theory and method; the major theoretical and methodological 
systems. Examines selected cases of research in which theory and method are classically 
combined. Sawhney 

SOC 512 Family Analysis. Preq.: SOC 202 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F.S. Examines the basic 
theoretical and methodological framework in sociology within which contemporary family 
research is conducted. Mercer 

SOC (ED) 513 Community Organization and Development. Preq.: SOC 202 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Community organization is viewed as a process of bringing about 
desirable changes in community life. Community needs and resources are studied. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 241 

Democratic processes in community action and principles of organization are stressed, along 
with techniques and procedures. Roles of lay and professional workers are analyzed. 

Moxley 

SOC 514 Developing Societies. Preq.: Six hours SOC or ANT or grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. 
Defines major problems posed for development sociology and explores the social barriers and 
theoretical solutions for development set forth with regard to the newly-developing coun- 
tries. Significant past strategies reviewed and main themes in current development schemes 
presented. Untested strategies for the future proposed and discussed. These problems are ex- 
amined in their national and international contexts. Moxley 

SOC 515 Deviant Behavior. Preq.: Six hours SOC or ANT or grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. 
Topics include: the inevitability of deviance and its social utility; cross-cultural variations in 
appearance and behavioral cues for labeling the deviate; descriptive and explanatory ap- 
proaches to kinds and amounts of deviance in contemporary American society; social change, 
anomie and social disorganization theories; the process of stigmatization; formal and infor- 
mal societal responses to deviance and the deviant; social action implications. 

Graduate Staff 

SOC (PS) 517 The Police Bureaucracy in a Democratic Society. 3(3-0) F,S. (See 
political science, page 220.) 

SOC 523 Sociological Analysis of Agricultural Land Tenure Systems. Preq.: Three 
hours SOC. 3(3-0) F. A systematic sociological analysis of the major agricultural and land- 
tenure systems of the world with emphasis on problems of U.S. family farm ownership and 
tenancy. Graduate Staff 

SOC 533 Theory of Human Communication Behavior. Preqs.: Six hours SOC or social 
psychology and grad. standing. 3(3-0) F,S. The behavioral science approach to understanding 
human communication which is treated as a basic social psychological process in which com- 
munication events are analyzed in terms of their effects on individual, interpersonal and 
group behavior. Surveys theory, research methods and empirical findings. Communication 
behavior as a mediating mechanism in social interactions. Graduate Staff 

SOC 534 Agricultural Organizations and Movements. Preqs.: Three hours SOC, 
American history, American government or a related social science or consent of depart- 
ment. 3(3-0) F,S. A history of agricultural organizations and movements in the United States 
and Canada principally since 1865, emphasizing the Grange, the Farmers' Alliance, the Pop- 
ulist revolt, the Farmers' Union, the Farm Bureau, the Equity societies, the Nonpartisan 
League, cooperative marketing, government programs and present problems. 

Graduate Staff 

SOC 541 Social Systems and Planned Change. Preq.: Three hours SOC. 3(3-0) F,S. An 
examination of social systems within the framework of both functional theory and conflict 
theory, with particular emphasis upon system change and the planning of social change. 

Marsh 

SOC 555 Social Stratification. Preq.: Six hours SOC. 3(3-0) F,S. The theoretical 
background, methodological approaches, and analysis of the consequences of systems of 
stratification. Emphasizes the static and dynamic qualities of stratification systems on rela- 
tions within and between societies. Attention to the integrative and divisive quality of 
stratification as it is expressed in life styles, world views, etc. Davis 

SOC 560 Racial and Cultural Contacts. Preq.: Six hours SOC or CI. 3(3-0) F,S. 1) Ex- 
amines intergroup relations as a legitimate concern of the social sciences, 2) Appraises cross- 
cultural data drawn from a variety of situations wherein race and ethnicity figure in a 
significant manner, 3) Attempts to interpret data by delineating observable patterns, trends 
and relationships. Graduate Staff 



242 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

SOC 565 Sociology and General Systems Theory. Preqs.: Six hours SOC, one ST course. 
3(3-0) F,S. Examines the basis of general systems theory and its application in the 
sociological fields. Emphasizes the philosophical nature of systems theory and its potential 
as an alternative conceptualization to mechanistic and organismic models. Scrutinizes the 
underlying basis of systems theory; cybernetics as models of change and control; learning 
and equilibrium; information theory as models of choice and selection; decision theory, and 
game theory. Graduate Staff 

SOC 570 Commitment. Preq.: Six hours SOC. 3(3-0) F. The process of commitment and its 
strength are covered from several theoretical views as applicable to collective behavior, 
social movements, the sociology of religion, political sociology, deviance, attitudes, decision 
making, dissonance, structural effects and other topics. An aim is to construct propositions 
and testable models of the commitment process. Wimberley 

SOC (ED) 574 The Economics of Population. 3(3-0) S. (See economics and business, page 
99.) 

SOC 590 Applied Research. Preq.: SOC 202 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. Studies research 
process with emphasis upon its application to action problems. The development of research 
design to meet action research needs is stressed. Mustian 

SOC 591 Special Topics in Sociology. Preq.: CI. 1-6 F,S. An examination of current 
problems organized on a lecture-discussion basis. Course content varies as changing condi- 
tions require new approaches to emerging problems. Graduate Staff 

SOC 592 Demographic Structure and Processes. Preq.: SOC 509 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. 
Explores in depth the major demographic variables (size, composition and distribution) and 
basic demographic processes (fertility, mortality and migration). Attention to theoretical 
and methodological considerations as well as to current substantive knowledge. Specific 
course content varies depending upon student needs and interests. Clifford, Mustian 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

SOC 601 Urban Ecology. Preq.: SOC 509. 3(3-0) S. The course involves an historical ap- 
proach to the development of the field as well as an analysis of the present state of the field. 
Because of the range of subject matter subsumed under the topic of ecology, the linkages be- 
tween sociology and other disciplines concerning themselves with the subject will be 
delineated and examined. Davis 

SOC 61 1 Research Methods in Sociology. Preqs.: SOC 416, ST 311 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. 
Designed to give the student a mature insight into the nature of scientific research in 
sociology. Assesses the nature and purpose of research designs, the interrelationship of 
theory and research, the use of selected techniques and their relation to research designs, 
and the use of modern tabulation equipment in research. McCann 

SOC 613 Theory of Mass Communication. Preq.: SOC 533 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. This 
course provides the advanced student in the social sciences with an opportunity to examine 
the emerging body of theory and research in the field of mass communications. Course con- 
tent will treat: (1) the systems character of mass communication, (2) social communication at 
the individual and group level, (3) persuasive communication and social control, (4) com- 
munication and opinion change, and (5) communication and societal development. In addi- 
tion to the theoretical and methodolological underpinnings drawn from the behavioral 
sciences, the course will examine contributions from the communication arts and applied 
communications. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 243 

SOC 615 Research on Crime and Deviance. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. Major topics 
include: an examination of conceptual problems and research issues and methods in the 
study of crime and deviance; an assessment of current research on crime causation and 
deviance processes; an examination of research on social control processes and agencies; and 
an assessment of social action and evaluative research. A variety of substantive topics will be 
dealt with in the context of the above topical areas including: delinquency, drug usage, men- 
tal illness, obesity, stuttering, suicide, prostitution, homicide and rape. Graduate Staff 

SOC 621 Social Psychology. Preq.: Six hours SOC. 3(3-0) S. The objective of this course is 
to present the major ideas of social psychology in the context of the theoretical orientations 
from which they have emerged. The nature and role of theory in social psychology are ex- 
amined. The social psychologies of various theorists are then examined in terms of their par- 
ticular approaches including the Gestalt, Field, Role, Psychoanalytic, and Reinforcement 
orientations and combinations of these. McCann 

SOC 631 Population Analysis. Preq.: Six hours SOC. 3(3-0) S. Methods of describing, 
analyzing and presenting data on human populations: distribution, characteristics, natural 
increase, migration and trends in relation to resources. Graduate Staff 

SOC 632 Sociology of the Family. Preq.: Six hours SOC. 3(3-0) S. Emphasis is placed on 
the development of an adequate sociological frame of reference for family analysis; on dis- 
covering both the uniquely cultural and common-human aspects of the family by means of 
cross-cultural comparisons; on historical explanations for variability in American families 
with special concern for the family; and on analyzing patterns of family stability and effec- 
tiveness. Graduate Staff 

SOC 633 The Community. Preq.: Six hours SOC. 3(3-0) S. The community is viewed in 
sociological perspective as a functioning entity. A method of analysis is presented and ap- 
plied to eight "dimensions," with emphasis on the unique types of understanding to be 
derived from measuring each dimension. Finally, the effect of change on community integra- 
tion and development is analyzed. Graduate Staff 

SOC 641 Statistics in Sociology. Preq.: ST 513 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. The application of 
statistical methods of sociological research. Emphasis on selecting appropriate models, in- 
struments and techniques for the more frequently encountered problems and forms of data. 

Mustian 

SOC 645 Advanced Sociological Measurement. Preqs.: SOC 611; ST 511 or 513. 3(3-0) S. 
Various issues concerning the measurement of social variables are examined and techniques 
are described. These issues and techniques include operationalism and epistemic correlation, 
levels of measurement, transformations, social indicators, scaling, dimensionality, validity, 
and reliability. Existing examples and potential applications in sociological research are con- 
sidered. Wimberley 

SOC 646 Advanced Sociological Analysis. Preqs.: SOC 611; ST 511 or 513. 3(3-0) S. Ad- 
vanced analysis techniques adaptable to the needs of sociological research are examined. 
Special attention is given to causal analysis, the analysis of change, and aggregate versus 
individual level data analyses. Sociological examples are considered. Emerging issues and 
techniques are given attention. Wimberley 

SOC 652 Comparative Societies. Preq.: Six hours SOC. 3(3-0) S. Sociological analysis of 
societies around the world with particular reference to North and South America. Special 
emphasis is given to cultural and physical setting, population composition, levels of living, 
relationship of the people to the land, structure and function of the major institutions and 
forces making for change. Graduate Staff 



244 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

SOC 653 Theory and Development of Sociology. Preqs.: SOC 511, CI. 3(3-0) S. Detailed 
analysis of methodological and substantive problems in utilizing sociological theories in 
varied areas, and an examination of events and trends in the development of sociology. 

Graduate Staff 

SOC 670 Theories of Population. Preq.: SOC 509 and/or SOC 511 or CI. 3(3-0) F. This 
course provides an overview of population theory utilizing a combined chronological and 
topical approach. Major topics include: sociological analysis of ancient and medieval views of 
population; mercantilism and population; economic, Utopian, philosophical and biological 
theories of population in the 18th century; Malthusian theory; and post-Malthusian theory, 
including biological, anthropological, mathematical, economic, political, historical, and es- 
pecially social and social-psychological approaches. Suval 

SOC 671 Social Demography. Preqs.: Grad. standing; SOC 509 or 631 or equivalents. 3(3- 
0) S. The basic purpose of this course is to develop on the part of the student an appreciation 
of the sociological variables capable of being used in demographic research and to provide an 
overview of the current substantive knowledge concerning social and demographic systems, 
social action systems, and social aggregate systems. Graduate Staff 

SOC 690 Seminar. Credits Arranged. F,S. Appraisal of current literature; presentation of 
research papers by students; progress reports on departmental research; review of develop- 
ing research methods and plans; reports from scientific meetings and conferences; other 
professional matters. Graduate Staff 

SOC 699 Research in Sociology. Preq.: Consent of chairman of graduate study commit- 
tee. Credits Arranged. F, S. Planning and execution of research, and preparation of 
manuscript under supervision of graduate committee. Graduate Staff 



Soil Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor C. B. McCants, Head 

Professors: S. W. Buol, M. G. Cook, F. R. Cox, C. B. Davey, J. W. Gilliam, W. A. 
Jackson, E. J. Kamprath, R. J. Volk, J. B. Weber, S. B. Weed, A. G. Wollum; 
Extension Professors: J. V. Baird, J. A. Phillips; Adjunct Professors: L. J. Metz, 
C. G. Wells; Professors Emeriti: W. V. Bartholomew, R. W. Cummings, J. W. 
Fitts, J. F. Lutz, W. G. Woltz, W. W. Woodhouse Jr.; Associate Professors: B. L. 
Carlile, D. K. Cassel, G. A. Cummings, R. E. McCollum, C. D. Raper Jr., P. A. 
Sanchez, E. D. Seneca, R. W. Skaggs; Associate Professor USDA: G. R. Burns; 
Assistant Professors: L. D. King, C. K. Martin, G. S. Miner, J. J. Nicholaides, G. 
F. Peedin, W. P. Robarge, J. E. Shelton; Assistant Professor USDA: D. W. Israel; 
Extension Assistant Professors: H. J. Kleiss, G. C. Naderman; Adjunct Assistant 
Professor: D. W. Eaddy; Research Associate: S. W. Broome 

The Department of Soil Science offers graduate programs leading to the Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. These are research-oriented degrees 
and require a dissertation based on individual research on some aspect of the 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 245 

science. In addition, the Master of Agriculture and Master of Life Sciences degrees 
(non-thesis) with an emphasis on agronomy may be obtained through the depart- 
ment. 

Excellent physical facilities are available for instruction and research in all 
phases of the science. Laboratories are well equipped with modern instruments 
that enable a student to conduct high-level research. Service laboratories for soil 
and plant analyses are available as well as special preparation rooms for soil and 
plant samples. Greenhouses, growth chambers and a phytotron are easily accessi- 
ble for controlled plant studies. Sites for field experiments are available on the 16 
research farms and four experimental forests owned or operated in conjunction 
with the University. 

This department is highly regarded for its expertise in tropical soil science. A 
limited number of opportunities are available to conduct thesis research in tropical 
regions under senior faculty supervision. 

Strong supporting departments greatly increase the graduate student's oppor- 
tunities for high quality training. Also, valuable teaching experience is obtained 
through participation in the department's teaching program. Graduates of the 
department find positions in industry, government, and academic institutions. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

SSC 501 Tropical Soils: Characteristics and Management. Preq.: Six credits in SSC. 
3(3-0) F. Characteristics of the tropical environment. Distribution and classification of 
tropical soils. Soil plant relationships in the tropics. Soil management systems emphasizing 
shifting cultivation, flooded rice production, subsistence farming and tropical pasture 
management. Sanchez 

SSC 511 Soil Physics. Preqs.: SSC 200, PY 212. 4(3-3) F. The study of soil physical proper- 
ties and theory of selected instrumentation to measure them. Topics include soil solids, soil 
water, air and heat. Transport processes and the energy concept of soil and water are 
emphasized. Cassel 

SSC 520 Soil and Plant Analysis. Preqs.: PY 212; CH 315; at least three soils courses in- 
cluding SSC 341 or CI. 3(1-6) S. Theory and advanced principles of the utilization of chemical 
instruments to aid research on the heterogeneous systems of soils and plants. Gilliam 

SSC 522 Soil Chemistry. Preqs.: SSC 200, one year of general inorganic chemistry. 3(3-0) 
S. A consideration of the chemical and colloidal properties of clay and soil systems, including 
ion exchange and retention, soil solution reactions, solvation of clays and electrokinetic 
properties of clay-water systems. Weed 

SSC (MB) 532 Soil Microbiology. Preqs.: MB 401; CH 220 or CI. 4(3-3) S. Soil as a 
medium for microbial growth, the relation of microbes to important mineral transforma- 
tions in soil, the importance of biological equilibrium, and significance of soil microbes to en- 
vironmental quality. Wollum 

SSC 541 Soil Fertility. Preq.: SSC 341. 3(3-0) F. Soil conditions affecting plant growth and 
the chemistry of soil and fertilizer interrelationships. Factors affecting the availability of 
nutrients. Methods of measuring nutrient availability. Kamprath 

SSC 551 Soil Morphology, Genesis and Classification. Preqs.: GY 120, SSC 200, SSC 
341. 3(3-0) F. Morphology: Concepts of soil horizons and soil profiles and chemical, physical 
and mineralogical parameters useful in characterizing them. Genesis: Soil-forming factors 



246 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

and processes. Classification: Historical development and present concepts of soil taxonomy 
with particular reference to great soil groups as well as discussion of logical basis of soil 
classification. Buol 

SSC 553 Soil Mineralogy. Preqs.: SSC 200, SSC 341, GY 330. 3(2-3) F. Composition, struc- 
ture, classification, identification, origin, occurrence, and significance of soil minerals with 
emphasis on primary weatherable silicates, layer silicate clays, and sesquioxides. Weed 

SSC 560 Advanced Soil Management. Preqs.: SSC 200, 341. 3(3-0) Sum. Studies of soil 
characteristics in the coastal plain, piedmont and mountain areas of North Carolina in- 
cluding several field trips. Discussion of management practices that should be associated 
with various soils for different types of enterprises. (Offered Sum. 1979 and alt. years.) 

Cook, Kamprath, Phillips 

SSC 590 Special Problems. Preq.: SSC 200. Credit Arranged. F,S. Special problems in 
various phases of soils. Emphasis will be placed on review of recent and current research. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

SSC (CS, HS) 614 Herbicide Behavior in Plants and Soils. 3(3-0) S. (See crop science, 
page 93.) 

SSC (MB) 632 Ecology and Functions of Soil Microorganisms. Preqs.: MB 401, SSC 
(MB) 532 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. A comprehensive examination of theories and concepts 
relative to ecology and functions of soil microorganisms. Topics include relationships of 
microbes to their environments, adaptive mechanisms, microbial processes in soil organic 
matter formation and degradation, and function of organic matter in soil systems. Subject 
emphasis will be determined by class interests and by current literature. (Offered 1979 and 
alt. years.) Graduate Staff 

SSC 651 Pedology. Preqs.: SSC 522, 511; SSC 551 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. A critical study 
of current theories and concepts in soil genesis, morphology, and classification. (Offered 1980 
and alt. years.) Buol 

SSC (BAE) 671 Theory of Drainage— Saturated Flow. 3(3-0) Alt. F. (See biological and 
agricultural engineering, page 64.) 

SSC 672 Soil Properties and Plant Development. Preqs.: BCH 551, SSC 522 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) S. An examination of the interrelationships of soil properties and plant 
characteristics which regulate inorganic ion accumulation and dry matter production in 
higher plants. (Offered 1980 and alt. years.) Jackson 

SSC (BAE) 674 Theory of Drainage— Unsaturated Flow. 3(3-0) Alt. S. (See biological 
and agricultural engineering, page 64.) 

SSC 690 Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing in SSC. 1(1-0) F,S. A maximum of two semester 
hours is allowed toward the master's degree, but any number toward the doctorate. Scien- 
tific articles, progress reports in research and special problems of interest to soil scientists 
reviewed and discussed. Graduate Staff 

SSC 693 Colloquium in Soil Science. Preq.: Grad. standing in SSC. Credits Arranged. 
F,S. Seminar-type discussions and lectures on specialized and advanced topics in soil science. 

Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 247 

SSC 699 Research. Preq.: Grad. standing in SSC. Credits Arranged. F,S. A maximum of 
six semester hours is allowed toward the master's degree but any number toward the doc- 
torate. Graduate Staff 



Special Education 

For information on this program see special education under education, page 105. 

Statistics 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. D. Mason, Head 

Professors: B. B. Bhattacharyya, C. C. Cockerham, F. G. Giesbrecht, H. J. Gold, M. 
M. Goodman, A. H. E. Grandage, R. J. Hader, W. L. Hafley, D. W. Hayne, F. E. 
McVay, R. J. Monroe, L. A. Nelson, C. H. Proctor, C. P. Quesenberry, J. 0. Rawl- 
ings, D. L. Ridgeway, J. A. Rigney, R. G. D. Steel— Graduate Administrator, H. 
R. van der Vaart, J. L. Wasik, 0. Wesler; Adjunct Professors: A. L. Finkler, J. T. 
Wakeley; Professor Emeritus: G. M. Cox; Associate Professors: A. R. Gallant, T. 
M. Gerig, T. Johnson, A. C. Linnerud, A.. R. Manson; Visiting Associate 
Professor: B. S. Weir; Adjunct Associate Professors: E. L. Battiste, D. L. 
Bayless, J. R. Chromy, H. L. Crutcher, H. T. Schreuder; Assistant Professors: 
D.D. Boos, D. A. Dickey, H. J. Kirk, T. W. ReWand; Adjunct Assistant Professors: 
J. H. Goodnight 

The Department of Statistics offers the Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees in statistics and biomathematics, as well as the Master of 
Statistics (non-thesis) and the Master of Biomathematics (non-thesis). It has a 
working arrangement with the Department of Biostatistics in the School of Public 
Health at Chapel Hill, whereby graduate students can minor in the Division of 
Health Affairs, and maintains a close liaison with the Department of 
(Mathematical) Statistics at Chapel Hill in order to supplement the offerings in 
statistical theory. The three departments are affiliated with the Institute of 
Statistics (see page 17). 

Members of the department conduct research in biomathematics, operations 
research, probability theory and the development and application of statistical 
theory. Many staff members consult with researchers in the biological, physical 
and social sciences and conduct their research on statistical problems encountered 
there. 

A graduate student may minor in one of many applied departments, or in 
mathematics or mathematical statistics. For the graduate student who wishes to 
minor in statistics, the department has a flexible curriculum. Many employers of- 
fer added inducements for research personnel with such a minor. 



248 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

A program of training in biomathematics at the doctoral and postdoctoral levels 
is available in the department. This program requires that students become well 
grounded in four areas — mathematics, statistics, physical science and some phase 
of biology. Mathematical biology and related areas are now developing rapidly and 
there is much opportunity for. properly trained people. 

The department provides computer programming and other assistance to the 
Agricultural Experiment Station staff in close cooperation with the campus com- 
puting center. It furnishes research and consulting services on a contract basis and 
this supplies live problems on which graduate students may acquire experience and 
maturity. 

The department is located in a new building and ample space for graduate stu- 
dents is provided. A computing laboratory is located in the graduate student area. 

The computing facilities described on page 18 are fully available to statistics stu- 
dents and faculty. The department has access to this facility through a medium- 
speed terminal conveniently near for batch processing, with several low-speed ter- 
minals of different types, including Teletype, IBM 2741 (with plotter), Tektronics 
4010-1 graphics with a hard copy unit, and an IMLAC PDS-4 graphics unit with 
light pen and a 16K word memory. Interactive computing is done largely through 
TSO (Time Sharing Option). In addition, the University Systems Analysis and Con- 
trol Center has various computers including the IBM System 7, PDP 11/40, a 
hybrid 1130 analog unit, and additional graphics devices. The Center is available 
for use by graduate students in statistics. 

The department has approximately 15 assistantships at stipends adjusted to the 
previous training and experience of the recipients. Students with a major in an ap- 
plied field and at least one year of calculus, or with a major in statistics or 
mathematics are encouraged to apply for assistantships. Students with no advan- 
ced calculus or matrix algebra are advised that their programs may be somewhat 
lengthened as a consequence. An adequately prepared graduate assistant can com- 
plete the master's degree in two years (in less time if one takes courses during the 
summer); with a master's degree in statistics, one can complete the requirements 
for the doctorate in two years. 

Most fields of research, development, production and distribution are seeking 
persons trained in statistical theory and methods. The demand is equally strong 
from universities, agricultural and engineering experiment stations, national 
defense agencies, other federal agencies and a wide variety of industrial concerns. 
There is a need for experimental statisticians with the master's degree as well as 
for those with the doctorate. 

North Carolina State University is represented on the Committee on Statistics of 
the Southern Regional Education Board. This committee sponsors a continuing 
series of graduate summer sessions. Each of the sponsoring institutions will accept 
the credits earned by students in the summer session as residence credit. Informa- 
tion regarding these courses may be obtained from the Department of Statistics or 
the Dean of the Graduate School. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 249 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

ST 421, 422 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics. Preq.: (421) MA 202 or MA 212; 
(422) ST 421. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ST 493 Special Topics in Statistics. Preq.: CI. 1-3 F. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ST 501, 502 Basic Statistical Analysis. Preq.: ST 372 or equivalent or CI. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Basic concepts, random variables, distributions, statistical measures, estimation, tests of 
hypotheses, the anova, elementary design and sampling, factorial experiments, multiple 
regression, covariance, analysis of discrete data and other topics. Primarily for statistics ma- 
jors and minors. Steel 

ST 507 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences I. 3(3-0) F. A general introduction to the 
use of descriptive and inferential statistics in behavioral science research. Methods for 
describing and summarizing data are presented, followed by procedures for estimating pop- 
ulation parameters and testing hypotheses concerning the summarized data. Wasik 

ST 508 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences II. Preq.: ST 507 or CI. 3(3-0) S. The use of 
statistical design principles in behavioral science research is introduced. The use of a 
statistical model to represent the structure of data collected from a designed experiment or 
survey study is presented. Opportunities are provided for use of a computer to perform 
analyses of data to evaluate the proposed statistical model and to assist in post-hoc analysis 
procedures. Least squares principles are used to integrate the topics of multiple linear 
regression analysis, the analysis of variance, and analysis of covariance. Wasik 

ST 511 Experimental Statistics for Biological Sciences I. Preq.: ST 311 or grad. 
standing. 3(3-0) F,S. Basic concepts of statistical models and use of samples; variation, 
statistical measures, distributions, tests of significance, analysis of variance and elementary 
experimental design, regression and correlation, chi-square. Graduate Staff 

ST 512 Experimental Statistics for Biological Sciences II. Preq.: ST 511 or equivalent. 
3(3-0) F,S. Covariance, multiple regression, curvilinear regression, concepts of experimental 
design, factorial experiments, confounded factorials, individual degrees of freedom and split- 
plot designs. Graduate Staff 

ST 513 Experimental Statistics for Social Sciences I. Preq.: ST 311 or grad. standing. 
3(3-0) F. Basic ideas of statistical inference; probability distributions, hypothesis testing, es- 
timation, with emphasis on applications to sample data from experiments and survey. 

McVay 

ST 514 Experimental Statistics for Social Sciences II. Preq.: ST 513 or equivalent. 3(3-0) 
S. Extension of basic statistical concepts to computer handling of data from social surveys; 
sample designs using clustered, stratified, systematic and multi-stage selections; analysis of 
variance continued; multiple, multivariate regression. Proctor 

ST 515, 516 Experimental Statistics for Engineers. Preq.: ST 361 or grad. standing. 3(3- 
0) F,S. General statistical concepts and techniques useful to research workers in engineering, 
textiles, wood technology, etc. Probability, distributions, measurement of precision, simple 
and multiple regression, tests of significance, analysis of variance, enumeration data, and ex- 
perimental designs. Hader 

ST 517 Applied Least Squares. Preq.: ST 502 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Least squares es- 
timation and hypothesis testing procedures for linear models. Regression, analysis of 



250 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

variance and covariance is considered in a unified manner that requires no extensive 
mathematical background. Emphasis is on the use of the computer to apply these techniques 
to experimental (including unequal cell sizes) and survey situations. Wasik 

ST 519 Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis. Preqs.: ST 511 and ST 512 or 

equivalent. 3(3-0) S. An introduction to the use of multivariate statistical methods in the 
analysis of data collected in experiments and surveys. Topics covered will include mul- 
tivariate analysis of variance, discriminant analysis, canonical correlation analysis and prin- 
cipal components analysis. The use of a computer to perform the multivariate statistical 
analysis calculations will be emphasized. Wasik, Gerig 

ST 521 Statistical Theory I. Coreqs.: MA 425 or MA 405 or CI. 3(2-2) F. Discussion of the 
use of statistics as illustrated by an example pointing out the need for a probabilistic 
framework. The probability tools for statistics: description of discrete and absolutely con- 
tinuous distributions, expected values, moments, moment generating functions, transforma- 
tion of random variables, marginal and conditional distributions, independence, order 
statistics, multivariate distributions, concept of random sample, derivation of many sampl- 
ing distributions. Grandage, Bhattacharyya 

ST 522 Statistical Theory II. Preq.: ST 521; Coreq.: MA 426 or 512. 3(2-2) S. General 
framework for statistical inference. Point estimators: biased and unbiased, minimum 
variance unbiased, least mean square error, maximum likelihood and least squares, 
asymptotic properties. Interval estimators and tests of hypotheses: confidence intervals, 
power functions, Neyman-Pearson lemma, likelihood ratio tests, unbiasedness, efficiency 
and sufficiency. Grandage, Bhattacharyya 

ST 531 Design of Experiments. Preq.: ST 502 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Review of com- 
pletely randomized, randomized complete block and Latin square designs, and the basic con- 
cepts in the techniques of experimental design. Designs and analysis methods in factorial ex- 
periments, confounded factorials, response surface methodology, change-over design, split- 
plot experiments and incomplete block designs. Examples will be used to illustrate applica- 
tion and analysis of these designs. Monroe 

ST 532 Introduction to Survey Sampling. Preq.: MA 214 or ST 311 for equivalent. 3(3-0) 
S. Description of the principal steps in the planning and execution of sample surveys. Review 
of actual surveys in various fields. Basic concepts of sampling and sampling methods. Prac- 
tice in evaluating and designing sample surveys. Procter, Graduate Staff 

ST (MA) 541 Theory of Probability I. 3(3-0) F. (See mathematics, page 177.) 

ST (MA) 542 Introduction to Stochastic Processes. Preqs.: MA 405 and MA 541 or ST 
521. 3(3-0) S. Markov chains and Markov processes, Poisson process, birth and death 
processes, queuing theory, renewal theory, stationary processes. 

Wesler, Bhattacharyya 

ST 552 Basic Theory of Least Squares and Variance Components. Preqs.: MA 405, ST 
521; Coreq.: ST 522. 3(2-2) S. Theory of least squares; multiple regression; analysis of 
variance and covariance; experimental design models; factorial experiments; variance com- 
ponent models. Gallant 

ST (EB) 561 Intermediate Econometrics. 3(3-0) S. (See economics and business, page 
99.) 

ST (BMA, MA) 571 Biomathematics I. 3(3-0) F. (See biomathematics, page 67.) 

ST (BMA, MA) 572 Biomathematics II. 3(3-0) S. (See biomathematics, page 67.) 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 251 

ST 581 Introduction to Nonparametric Statistics. Preq.: ST 522. 3(3-0) F. This course 
will treat both theoretical and methodological material relevant to inference problems aris- 
ing when sampling is from a parent family with distribution function that is not assumed to 
have a particular functional form. Most of the course will be devoted to inference problems 
for the absolutely continuous family of distributions. Boos, Gerig 

ST 583 Introduction to Statistical Decision Theory. Preq.: ST 522. 3(3-0) F. Zero sum 
two-person game and statistical inference. Bayesian methods and orthodox statistical es- 
timation and testing; minimax decision role; empirical Bayes procedure; Bayes sequential 
decision procedure. (Offered F 1979 and alt. years.) Bhattacharyya 

ST 591 Special Problems. 1-3 F,S. Development of techniques for specialized cases, par- 
ticularly in connection with thesis and practical consulting problems. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ST (MA, OR) 606 Mathematical Programming II. Preq.. OR (IE, MA) 505 and MA 425 

or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. This course provides an advanced mathematical treatment of the 
analytical and algorithmic aspects of finite dimensional nonlinear programming. It includes 
an examination of the structure and effectiveness of computational methods for un- 
constrained and constrained minimization. Special attention will be directed toward current 
research and recent developments in the field. Bhattacharyya, Reiland 

ST 613 Time Series Analysis I. Preqs.: ST 522 and 502 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Statistical 
analysis of realizations of covariance stationary stochastic processes with emphasis 
throughout on the spectrum. Applications of the theory and methods developed are discussed 
and illustrated with examples. Topics include autoregressive processes, moving average 
processes, spectral analysis; estimation of the parameters appearing in a time series 
generated by a linear response function and covariance stationary errors; estimation of the 
spectrum and its use in the analysis of the residuals from fitted models. (Offered F 1978 and 
alt. years.) Dickey 

ST 614 Time Series Analysis II. Preq.: ST 613. 3(3-0) S. Extension of the theory and 
methods developed in ST 613 to multiple time series and nonlinear response functions. Topics 
include cross-spectral density, co-spectral density, quadrature-spectral density, coherence 
and phase; estimation of the parameters appearing in a time series generated by a nonlinear 
response function and covariance stationary errors; estimation of the cross-spectral density. 
(Offered S 1979 and alt. years.) Dickey 

ST (MA) 617, 618 Measure Theory and Advanced Probability. Preqs.: MA 426; ST 521 or 
MA 541 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. Modern measure and integration theory in abstract spaces. 
Probability measures, random variables, expectations. Distributions and characteristic func- 
tions. Modes of convergence. Independence, zero-one laws, laws of large numbers, three- 
series theorem. Central limit problem. Conditional expectations, martingales and martingale 
convergence theorems. Wesler 

ST (MA) 619 Topics in Advanced Probability. Preqs.: ST (MA) 617, 618. 3(3-0) F. In- 
finitely divisible distributions and stable laws. Stationarity, ergodic theorems. Markov 
chains. Weak convergence of probability measures on metric spaces, Brownian motion, in- 
variance principles, law of the iterated logarithm. Wesler 

ST 621 Statistics in Animal Science. Preq.: ST 517 (ST 502 for statistics majors) or CI. 
3(3-0) S. Sources and magnitudes of errors in experiments with animals, experimental 
designs and computer methods of analysis adapted to specific types of animal research; 
relative efficiency of alternate designs, amount of data required for specified accuracy, stu- 
dent reports on selected topics. Linnerud 



252 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ST 623 Statistics in Plant Science. Preq.: ST 512 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Principles and 
techniques of planning, establishing and executing field and greenhouse experiments. Size, 
shape and orientation of plots; border effects; estimation of size of experiments for specified 
accuracy; subsampling plots and yields for laboratory analysis; combining data from a series 
of years and/or locations; rotation experiments; soil test correlation; multiple comparisons in 
variety trial results; selection of predictors in multiple regression; introduction to in- 
terspecies and intraspecies plant competition experiments and models. Nelson 

ST (GN) 626 Statistical Concepts in Genetics. Preq.: GN 506; Coreq.: ST 502 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Migration, mutation, selection, drift, linkage, mating system, and other 
processes that bear on rates of change in population frequencies, means, and variances; 
magnitude and nature of genotypic and nongenotypic variability and their role in alternative 
procedures of plant and animal breeding; experimental and statistical approaches to the 
analysis of quantitative inheritance. (Offered S 1980 and alt. years.) Cockerham 

ST 631 Theory of Sampling Applied to Survey Design. Preqs.: MA 214 or equivalent; ST 
502 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Principles for interpretation and design of sample surveys. Es- 
timator biases, variances and comparative costs. Simple random sample, cluster sample, 
ratio estimation, stratification, varying probabilities of selection. Multi-stage, systematic 
and double sampling. Response errors. Proctor 

ST 637 Advanced Statistical Inference. Preqs.: ST 522, 617. 3(3-0) S. This course will 
treat the classical areas of statistical inference, estimation and hypothesis testing, at the 
measure-theoretical level. Emphasis will be upon treatment of these areas in depth. 

Quesenberry, van der Vaart 

ST (EB) 651 Econometrics. 3(3-0) F. (See economics and business, page 99.) 

ST (EB) 652 Topics in Econometrics. 3(3-0) S. (See economics and business, page 99.) 

ST 671 Advanced Analysis of Variance and Variance Components. Preqs.: ST 502 or 
equivalent, ST 552. 3(3-0) S. Expected mean squares, exact and approximate tests of 
hypotheses for balanced and unbalanced data sets. Fixed, mixed and random models. Ran- 
domization theory. Estimation of variance components using regression, MINQUE and 
general quadratic unbiased estimation theory. Giesbrecht 

ST 674 Advanced Topics in Construction and Analysis of Experimental Designs. 

Preqs.: ST 502 or equivalent, ST 552. 3(3-0) S. Construction and analysis of multifactor 
designs, factorials, fractional factorials, balanced incomplete block designs, Latin squares, 
orthogonal arrays of strength d, and response surface designs. Fractionating mixed level fac- 
torials, confounding and blocking techniques, study of robustness of designs to loss of design 
point. Manson 

ST 682 Statistical Analysis for Linear Models. Preqs.: ST 502 or equivalent, ST 552. 3(3- 
0) F. Theory and analysis of the general linear model including models with equality and ine- 
quality constraints, with possibly singular covariance structure, and with multivariate 
responses. Canonical decompositions and optimality properties of standard methods. Ap- 
plications to certain designs and growth curve analysis. Robust regression techniques. 
Strategic transformation of data. Gerig 

ST 683 Multivariate Analysis. Preqs. : ST 522 and ST 682. 3(3-0) S. Survey of multivariate 
statistical theory. Multivariate distributions including the multinormal, Wishart, Hotell- 
ing's T 2 , Fisher-Roy-Hsu, Wilks' A, and multivariate Beta distributions. Applications of 
maximum likelihood estimation, likelihood ratio testing, and the union-intersection princi- 
ple. Development of the theory of Hotelling's T 2 tests and confidence sets, discriminant 
analysis, canonical correlation, multivariate analysis of variance, and principal components. 
(Offered S 1980 and alt. years.) Gerig 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 253 

ST 691 Advanced Special Problems. Preqs.: ST 502 or equivalent, ST 552. 1-3 F,S. Any 
new advance in the field of statistics which can be presented in lecture series as unique op- 
portunities arise. Graduate Staff, Visiting Professors 

ST 694 Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. A maximum of two semester hours is allowed toward the 
master's degree, but any number toward the doctorate. Graduate Staff 

ST 699 Research. Credits Arranged. F,S. A maximum of nine semester hours is allowed 
toward the Master of Science degree; no limitation on semester hours in doctorate 
programs. Graduate Staff 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL 

STATISTICS COURSES 

U.N.C. ST 133 Introduction to Time Series Analysis. Preq.: U.N.C. ST 126. 3(3-0) F. Topics 
chosen from: Time series data analysis. Fitting parametric models, such as regression- 
autoregression models to time series. Spectrum analysis. Filtering. Wegman 

U.N.C. ST 150 Analysis of Variance with Application to Experimental Designs. 

Coreq.: U.N.C. ST 135. 3(3-0) S. Linear estimation. Gauss-Markoff theorem. Sums of squares. 
Analysis of variance and simple factorial designs. Intrablock analysis of incomplete block 
designs. Balanced, lattice and Latin square designs. Chakravarti, Johnson 

U.N.C. ST 170 Order Statistics. Preq.: U.N.C. ST 127. 3(3-0) S. Distribution and moments 
of order statistics. Estimation of location and scale parameters, censoring. Robust estima- 
tion. Shortcut procedures. Treatment of outliers. Extreme-value theory. Carroll 

U.N.C. ST 210 Design and Analysis of Experiments. Preqs.: U.N.C. ST 102 and 150. 3(3- 
0) F. The principles of the design and analysis of experiments. Randomized blocks. Latin and 
Graeco-Latin squares, factorial experiments. Confounding, fractional factorials, split plots, 
missing plots. Interblock analysis. Covariance analysis. Response surfaces. 

Johnson, Chakravarti 

U.N.C. ST 220 Theory of Estimation and Hypothesis Testing. Preqs.: U.N.C. ST 132 and 
135. 3(3-0) F. Bayes procedures for estimation and testing. Minimax procedures. Unbiased es- 
timators. Unbiased tests and similar tests. Invariant procedures. Sufficient statistics. Con- 
fidence sets. Large sample theory. Hoeffding 

U.N.C. ST 221 Sequential Analysis. Preqs.: U.N.C. ST 132 and 135. 3(3-0) F. Hypothesis 
testing and estimation when the sample size depends on the observations. Sequential 
probability ratio tests. Sequential design of experiments. Optimal stopping. Stochastic ap- 
proximation. Simons 

U.N.C. ST 222 Nonparametric Inference. Preqs.: U.N.C. ST 132, 135 and 112. 3(3-0) S. Es- 
timation and testing when the functional form of the population distribution is unknown. 
Rank, sign, and permutation tests. Optimum nonparametric tests and estimators. Robust 
procedures. Hoeffding 

U.N.C. ST 223 Statistical Large-Sample Theory. Preqs.: U.N.C. ST 132 and 135. 3(3-0) S. 
Asymptotically efficient estimators; maximum likelihood estimators; maximum probability 
estimators. Asymptotically optimal tests; likelihood ratio tests. (1979-1980and alt. 
years.) Hoeffding 

U.N.C. ST 232 General Theory of Statistical Decision. Preqs.: U.N.C. ST 135 and 112. 
3(3-0) S. Selected topics in the general theory of statistical decisions, based on the work of 
Abraham Wald. (1978-1979 and alt. years.) Hoeffding 



254 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

U.N.C. ST 235 Stochastic Processes. Preqs.: U.N.C. ST 112 and 132. 3(3-0) F. Advanced 
theoretic course including topics selected from: foundations of stochastic processes, renewal 
processes, stationary processes, Markov processes, martingales, point processes. (1979-1980 
and alt. years.) Baker, Leadbetter, W. L. Smith 

U.N.C. ST 237 Time Series Analysis. Preqs.: U.N.C. ST 112 and 132. 3(3-0) S. Analysis of 
time series data by means of particular models such as autoregressive and moving average 
schemes. Spectral theory for stationary processes and associated methods for inference. 
Stationarity testing. (1978-1979 and alt. years.) Leadbetter, Wegman 

U.N.C. ST 251 Combinatorial Problems of the Design of Experiments. Preq.: U.N.C. ST 
150. 3(3-0) F. Finite fields and finite geometries. Construction of orthogonal Latin squares 
and balanced incomplete block designs. Difference sets. Chakravarti 

U.N.C. ST 254 Special Topics in Design of Experiments I. Preq.: U.N.C. ST 150. 3(3-0) F. 
Factorial experiments. Confounding, construction and analysis of symmetrical and frac- 
tional factorial designs. Orthogonal arrays. Asymmetrical factorial designs. Response sur- 
face designs, second and third order rotatable designs. Mixture designs. Recent develop- 
ments. Chakravarti 

U.N.C. ST 255 Special Topics in the Design of Experiments II. Preq.: U.N.C. ST 251. 3(3- 
0) S. Combinatorial properties and construction of balanced, group divisible and partially 
balanced designs. Impossibility proofs. Orthogonal Latin squares of non-prime power orders. 
Orthogonal arrays. Asymmetrical fractionally replicated designs. Recent developments. 

Chakravarki 

U.N.C. ST 260 Multivariate Analysis. Preqs.: U.N.C. ST 135 and matrices. 3(3-0) F. Mul- 
tivariate normal distributions. Related distributions. Tests and confidence intervals. Mul- 
tivariate analysis of variance, covariance and regression. Association between subsets of a 
multivariate normal set. Theory of discriminant, canonical and factor analysis. 

Chakravarti, Johnson 

U.N.C. ST 261 Advanced Parametric Multivariate Analysis. Preq.: U.N.C. ST 260. 3(3- 
0) S. Distribution problems involved in the normal theory analysis of general multivariate 
linear models including the growth curves. Roy's union intersection principle and its role in 
multivariate analysis. An introduction to Zonal polynomials and orthogonal groups. (1978- 
1979 and alt. years.) Sen 

U.N.C. ST 262 Introductory Nonparametric Multivariate Analysis. 3(3-0) F. The 
problem of symmetry in the multivariate case. Nonparametric MANOVA in one-way 
classifications. Robust rank order estimation in MANOVA. Large sample properties of the 
tests and estimates. Tests for independence. Sen 

U.N.C. ST 263 Advanced Nonparametric Multivariate Analysis. Preq.: U.N.C. ST 262. 
3(3-0) S. Nonparametric inference in multifactor multiresponse experiments. Robust 
procedures in general linear models including the growth curves. Nonparametric classifica- 
tion problems. (1980-1981 and alt. years.) Sen 

U.N.C. ST 300, 301 Seminar in Statistical Literature. Preq.: U.N.C. ST 135. 1(1-0) F,S. 

Graduate Staff 

U.N.C. ST 302 Seminar in Statistical Data Analysis. Preq.: U.N.C. ST 102. (Var.) S. 

Graduate Staff 

U.N.C. ST 310, 31 1 Seminar in Theoretical Statistics. Preq.: U.N.C. ST 135. 3(3-0) F,S. 

Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 255 

U.N.C. ST 321, 322 Special Problems. Preq.: CI. 3(3-0) F,S. Graduate Staff 

U.N.C. ST 331, 332 Advanced Research. Preq.: CI. 3(3-0) F,S. Graduate Staff 

Textiles 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. W. Chaney, Dean 

Professors: K. S. Campbell, D. M. Cates, J. A. Cuculo, A. H. M. El-Shiekh, T. W. 
George, R. D. Gilbert, D. S. Hamby— Acting Head of the Department of Textile 
Materials and Management, S. P. Hersh— Chairman of the Committee for the 
Fiber and Polymer Science Program, P. R. Lord— Graduate Administrator in 
Textile Materials and Management, R. McGregor— Graduate Administrator in 
Textile Chemistry, M. H. M. Mohamed, J. A. Porter Jr., M. R. Shaw, W. K. 
Walsh, W. M. Whaley— Head of the Department of Textile Chemistry; 
Professors Emeriti: J. F. Bogdan, G. Goldfinger, H. A. Rutherford, R. W. Work; 
Adjunct Professors: H. F. Mark, A. M. Sookne; Associate Professors: S. K. Batra, 
W. D. Cooper, C. L. Dyer, P. D. Emerson, R. E. Fornes, P. L. Grady, T. H. Guion, 
B. S. Gupta, J. J. F. Knapton, C. D. Livengood, M. L. Robinson Jr., W. C. Stuckey 
Jr., M. H. Theil, P. A. Tucker Jr.; Associate Professor Emeritus: T. G. Rochow; 
Adjunct Associate Professors: V. F. Holland, D. M. Powell, P. E. Sasser; 
Assistant Professors: R. A. Donaldson, G. N. Mock; Adjunct Assistant Professor: 
L. A. Graham 

The School of Textiles offers programs leading to the Master of Science degree in 
the Departments of Textile Chemistry and Textile Materials and Management, the 
professional degree of Master of Textiles, and the Doctor of Philosophy in fiber and 
polymer science. (For a description of the fiber and polymer science program, see 
page 141.) 

Students otherwise meeting the requirements of the Graduate School and with 
Bachelor of Science degrees with majors in textiles, the physical sciences or 
engineering will normally qualify for the graduate degree programs. 

The minimum requirement for a Master of Textiles degree is the satisfactory 
completion of 33 semester hours of advanced courses. There is no thesis or foreign 
language requirement. This program offers the student advanced professional 
training with emphasis on management, quality or manufacturing control, 
technology, machine design or textile design. 

The programs of study for the Master of Science degree include a minimum of 30 
semester hours of advanced courses, including six semester hours devoted to a 
thesis based on research conducted by the student. There is no foreign language re- 
quirement. The plan of course work and the research activities for the Master of 
Science degree are designed to prepare the student for a career in research, 
development or other technical phases of the textile and allied industries. Students 
mav minor in one or more of a number of associated fields. 



256 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Programs of study may be arranged to develop a broad background in three 
general areas: advanced textile materials science, production and marketing 
management of textiles, and textile chemistry. Those students interested in the 
first of these may emphasize areas such as fiber and yarn processing operations, 
mechanical and physical properties of fibers and textile structures, and testing or 
quality control. Programs leading to the Master of Science degree in textile 
chemistry emphasize fiber and polymer chemistry in its own right and as a basis 
for dyeing and finishing treatments for textile materials. In the area of marketing 
and production management, the program emphasizes the applications of quan- 
titative decision methods including operations research and computer techniques 
to the textile industry. Programs in this area normally terminate within the School 
of Textiles with a master's degree but may be structured to provide suitable 
backgrounds for students wishing to do further graduate work in the areas of 
economics and business, industrial management, industrial engineering or 
business administration. 



Fiber and Polymer Science 

A list of associated courses is given on page 141. 

Textiles (General Courses) 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

T 402 Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Fiber Formation. Preqs.: CH 103, T 
203, MA 212, PY 212. 3(3-0) S. 

T 492 Problems in Science and Technology. Preq.: Jr. standing. 1(0-2) S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

T 500 Advanced Microscopy. Preq.: T 300 or CI. 3(1-4) F,S. Art and science of light and 
electron microscopy. Introduction to microradiography; theoretical and practical aspects of 
visibility, resolution and contrast. Assembly, testing and use of microscopes and accessories 
in describing, identifying and micrographing crystalline oriented or amorphous materials, es- 
pecially those of interest to the student. May include special projects for independent in- 
vestigations. Tucker 

T 501 Resinography. Preqs.: T 300 or T 500 and TX 460 or TX 560 or TC 461. 3(1-4) F,S. 
Structure and morphology of resins, fibers, elastomers and composites, studied by reflected 
and transmitted light or electrons. Other methods of diffraction and spectrometry. 
Crystallographic and optical properties emphasized. Graduate Staff 

T 506 Color Science. Preq.: Sr. in TC or grad. standing. 3(2-2) F. A thorough discussion of 
color theory with particular emphasis on color measurement. Color and color difference 
calculations. From the data of the basic color matching experiments the description of a color 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 267 

space and its transformation into the CIE color space will be followed in detail. The basis of 
color difference calculations will be discussed. Color matches and color differences will be 
calculated based on experimental data obtained in the course. McGregor 



Textile Chemistry 

For a listing of graduate faculty and other information, see textiles, page 255. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

TC 403, 404 Textile Chemical Technology. (403) Preqs.: T 301, TC 303; Coreq.: CH 223; 
(404) Preq.: TC 403. 3(3-0) F,S. 

TC 405, 406 Textile Chemical Technology Laboratory. (405) Preqs.: T 301, TC 303; 
Coreq.: TC 403; (406) Preqs.: CH 223, TC 303; Coreq.: TC 404. (405) 1 (0-3) F, (406) 2(0-6) S. 

TC 411 Textile Chemical Analysis I. Preq.: T 301. 3(2-2) S. 

TC 412 Textile Chemical Analysis II. Preq.: T 203. 3(2-3) S. 

TC (CH) 461 Chemistry of Fibers. Preq.: CH 223. 3(3-0) F. 

TC 490 Special Topics in Textile Chemistry. 1-6 F.S.Sum. 

TC 491 Seminar in Textile Chemistry. Preqs.: TC 303, 403. 1(0-2) S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

TC 504 Fiber Formation— Theory and Practice. Preqs.: MA 301, PY 208 or CI. 3(3-0) F. 
Practical and theoretical analysis of the chemical and physical principles underlying the con- 
ventional methods of converting bulk polymer to fiber; rheology; melt, dry and wet polymer 
extrusion; fiber drawing; heat setting; general theory applied to unit processes. Cuculo 

TC 505 Theory of Dyeing. Preq.: CH 433 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Mechanisms of dyeing. Applica- 
tion of thermodynamics to dyeing systems. Kinetics of diffusion in dyeing processes. 

McGregor 

TC 561 Organic Chemistry of High Polymers. Preqs.: TC (CH) 461, CH 331 or CH 431. 
3(3-0) S. Principles of step- and chain-growth polymerizations; copolymerization theory; 
homogeneous free radical polymerization; emulsion polymerization; Zieglcr-Natta 
polymerization; ionic polymerization. Gilbert, Theil 

TC (CH) 562 Physical Chemistry of High Polymers— Bulk Properties. Preqs.: CH 220 

or 223, CH 331 or 431. 3(3-0) F. Molecular weight; states of aggregation and their interconwr- 
sion; rubbery, glassy and crystalline states; rubber elasticity; molecular friction; diffusion 
and viscosity; dynamics of network response; retardation- and relaxation-time spectra; ther- 
modynamics of nucleation; kinetics of crystallization. Gates, Walsh 

TC (CHE) 569 Polymers, Surfactants and Colloidal Materials. 3(3-0) F. (See chemical 
engineering, page 72.) 

TC (CHE) 570 Radiation Chemistry and Technology of Polymeric Systems. 8(8-0) S. 

(See chemical engineering, page 72.) 



258 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

TC 591 Special Topics in Textile Science. Preqs.: Sr. or grad. standing and CI. 1-4 F,S. 
Intensive treatments of selected topics in textile, polymer and fiber science. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

TC 662 Physical Chemistry of High Polymers— Solution Properties. Preqs.: CH 433, TC 
(CH) 562. 3(3-0) S. Sorption and diffusion; thermodynamics of polymer solutions; phase 
equilibria; configurational and frictional properties; determination of molecular weight. 

Cates, Walsh 

TC (CHE) 669 Diffusion in Polymers. 2(2-0) S. (See chemical engineering, page 72.) 

TC (CHE) 671 Special Topics in Polymer Science. 1-3 F. (See chemical engineering, page 

72.) 

TC (TX) 691 Special Topics in Fiber Science. 1-3 S. (See textile materials and manage- 
ment, page 258.) 

TC 698 Seminar for Textile Chemistry. 1(1-0) F,S. Discussion of scientific articles and 
presentations; review and discussion of student papers and research problems. 

Graduate Staff 

TC 699 Textile Research for Textile Chemistry. Credits Arranged. Individual research 
in the field of textile chemistry. Graduate Staff 



Textile Materials and Management 

For a listing of graduate faculty and other information see textiles, page 255. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

TX 405 Non-Conventional Fabric Structures. Preqs.: Sr. standing and CI. 3(3-0) S. 

TX 420 Modern Developments in Yarn Manufacturing Systems. Preq.: Sr. standing. 
3(3-0) S. 

TX 425 Textured Yarn Production and Properties. Preqs.: T 211, T 220. 3(2-2) F. 

TX 426 Long Staple and Tow Systems. Preqs.: T 211, T 220. 3(2-2) F. 

TX 431 Special Topics in Testing. Preqs.: TX 330, sr. or grad. standing. 3(2-2) F. 

TX 441 Knitwear and Hosiery Manufacture. Preq.: TX 340. 3(2-2) F. 

TX 442 Advanced Knitted Fabric Design. Preq.: TX 340 or 370. 3(2-2) S. 

TX 443 Analysis of Knitting Systems and Fabric Properties. Preq.: TX 340. 3(3-0) F. 

TX 449 Warp Knitting Systems. Preq.: TX 340. 3(2-2) S. 

TX 450 Advanced Design and Weaving. Preq.: TX 350. 3(2-2) F. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 259 

TX 451 Complex Woven Structures. Preq.: TX 450. 3(2-2) S. 

TX 460 Physical Properties of Textile Fibers. Preqs.: MA 212, PY 212. 3(3-0) F,S. 

TX 470 Fabric Styling and Design. Preqs.: Jr. or sr. standing and CI. 2(2-0) S. 

TX 480 Textile Cost Control. Preqs.: EB 201, TX 320, TX 350. 3(3-0) F,S. 

TX (EB) 482 Sales Management for Textiles. Preq.: TX 380. 3(3-0) F,S. 

TX 484 Management Decision Making for the Textile Firm. Preq.: TX (EB) 482. 3(3-0) 
F,S. 

TX 490 Development Project in Textile Technology. Preqs.: Sr. standing and CI. 2-3 
F,S,Sum. 

TX 491 Special Topics in Textiles. Preq.: Sr. standing. 1-3 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

TX 505 Textile Instrumentation and Control Systems. Preqs.: MA 301, PY 212 and one 

course in computer science. 3(3-0) F. The theory and application of instruments and control 
systems used in modern textile plants. Basic instruments and computer systems are 
described along with their use in process control, production control, research and develop- 
ment. Graduate Staff 

TX 520 Yarn Processing Dynamics. Preqs.: MA 301 and CI or grad. standing. 3(2-2) F. 
Theoretical analysis of the dynamics and machine-fiber interactions of such functions as 
opening, cleaning, carding actions, fiber attenuation, ring spinning, open-end spinning, tex- 
turing and winding. The role of fiber placement, cohesion and lubrication on yarn processing 
and properties. Laboratory experiments are designed to verify the analysis discussed in the 
lectures. Lord, El-Shiekh 

TX 530 Textile Quality Control. Preq.: TX 330 or CI. 3(3-0) S. Quality control systems for 
textile operations with emphasis on sampling plans for attributes and variables and on inter- 
pretation of data as related to identifying sources of product variability. Stuckey 

TX 541 Theory and Practice of Knitted Fabric Production and Control. Preqs.: TX 340 
and CI. 3(3-0) F. The technology and control of systems for manufacturing simple and com- 
plex knitted fabrics; control and monitoring of yarn feeding systems; influence of yarn, 
machine, finishing and fabric structure on the fabric aesthetics, physical and mechanical 
properties; optimization of fabric properties and machine productivity, including costing; 
problems of jacquard fabric processing and control. Knapton 

TX 549 Warp Knit Engineering and Structural Design. Preq.: TX 44!» 3(3-0 

Engineering analysis of tricot and raschel machinery. Design of yarn let-off and fabric take- 
up mechanisms. Studies of fabric production techniques and quality control systems. Theory 
of production optimization and the properties of fabrics. Complex geometrical loop mot 
and their application. Knapton 

TX 550 Fabric Analytics. Preq.: TX 350 or grad. standing. 3(3-0) F,S. Development of a 
numerical system for characterizing designs. Permutations and combinations of weave fo- 
ments. Correlation of fiber and yarn properties with those of the fabric. Knuinerrintf design 
of fabrics. Relationship between fabrics having geometrical similarity and the prediction (if 
their physical properties. Graduate Staff 



260 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

TX 555 Production Mechanics and Properties of Woven Fabrics. Preqs.: MA 301 and CI 
or grad. standing. 3(2-2) S. The interrelations between the mechanics of production and 
mechanical properties of woven fabrics; unit operations required to prepare yarns for weav- 
ing and the mechanisms employed in weaving; fabric structure, geometry and mechanical 
properties; designing for specific fabric properties. Mohamed 

TX 560 Structural and Physical Properties of Fibers. Preq.: MA 301. 3(3-0) F. Advanced 
study of the structure and physical properties (moisture, thermal, optical, frictional and elec- 
trical) of textile fibers. Theoretical relations and advanced techniques are presented and 
discussed. Fornes, Gupta 

TX 561 Mechanical and Rheological Properties of Fibrous Material. Preq.: MA 301. 
3(2-2) S. In-depth study of the stress-strain, bending, torsional, dynamic and rheological 
behavior of natural and man-made fibers. Theoretical relations and advanced techniques are 
presented and discussed. Fornes, Gupta 

TX (EB) 585 Market Research in Textiles. Preqs.: MA 405, ST 421. 3(3-0) S. A study and 
analysis of the quantitative methods employed in market research in the textile industry. 
The function of market research and its proper orientation to management and decision- 
making. Dyer 

TX 586 Textile Labor Management. Preq.: CI. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. A study of labor manage- 
ment problems in the textile industry, with particular emphasis directed toward the role of 
production supervision in a non-union textile plant. A study of NLRB decision and court 
opinions involving textile corporations. Powell 

TX 590 Special Projects in Textiles. Preqs.: Sr. standing or grad. standing, CI. 2-3 
F,S,Sum. Special studies in either the major or minor field of the advanced undergraduate or 
graduate student. These studies will include current problems of the industry, independent 
investigations, seminars and technical presentations, both oral and written. 

Graduate Staff 

TX 591 Special Topics. Preq.: CI. 1-4 F,S. An intensive treatment of selected topics in- 
volving textile technology. Graduate Staff 

TX 598 Textile Technology Seminar. Preqs.: Sr. standing, CI. 2(2-0) S. Lecture and dis- 
cussion of current topics relating to the textile industry. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

TX 601 Staple Fiber Structures I. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(2-2) S. Studies of advanced 
techniques in textile production; the technological aspects of fiber properties in relation to 
processing; studies of research findings and application of these to processing equipment. 

Lord 

TX 602 Staple Fiber Structures II. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(2-2) F.Sum. Problems deal- 
ing with advanced textile production and the technological implications of fiber processing 
will be assigned for study and investigation. Attention will be given to the preparation of 
reports for oral and written presentation. Graduate Staff 

TX 621 Textile Testing III. Preq.: TX 530 or equivalent. 2(2-0) S. Design of textile 
laboratories, including conditioning equipment and instruments required for specific needs; 
performance of tests and analysis of data on industrial problems; specialized physical tests; 
interlaboratory tests and analysis; study of A.S.T.M. specifications and work on task groups 
for A.S.T.M. Dyer, Stuckey 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 261 

TX 631 Synthetic Fibers. Preq.: TX 425 or 426 or equivalent. 2(1-2) F.S.Sum. Lectures and 
projects on advanced problems associated with the properties and processing of man-made 
continuous filament and staple fiber yarns. Hersh 

TX 640 Physical and Mechanical Properties of Knitted Fabric. Preq.: TX 541. 3(3-0) 
Alt. S. Seminar discussions of research literature on studies of the physical and mechanical 
properties of knitted fabrics. Knapton 

TX 651, 652 Fabric Development and Construction. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(1-4) F,S. 
Application of advanced technology to the development and construction of woven fabrics. 

Graduate Staff 

TX 663 Mechanics of Twisted Structures. Preqs.: ESM 301, TX 560. 3(3-0) F. Study of the 
basic mechanics of fibrous assemblies. Geometry and mechanics of twisted structures (yarns 
cords, braids. . .) and the translation of fiber properties into structural behavior. 

El-Shiekh 

TX 664 Mechanics of Fabric Structures. Preq.: TX 663. 3(3-0) S. Analysis of the 
geometry and behavior of woven, knitted and nonwoven fabrics under various stress condi- 
tions and end use applications. El-Shiekh 

TX 680 Special Projects in Textile Management. Preq.: TX (EB) 585. 1-3 F.S.Sum. 
Special studies in textile management covering current problems of the industry, indepen- 
dent investigations, seminars and technical presentations, both oral and written. 

Graduate Staff 

TX 686 Advanced Textile Labor Management Seminar. Preq.: TX 586. 3(3-0) F,S. A 
study of advanced labor management problems in the textile industry, with particular 
emphasis directed toward the application of the Occupational Safety and Health Act. 

Powell 

TX (TC) 691 Special Topics in Fiber Science. Preq.: CI. 1-3 S. The study of selected topics 
of particular interest in various advanced phases of fiber science. Graduate Staff 

TX 698 Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Discussion of scientific articles of interest to the textile in- 
dustry; review and discussion of student papers and research problems. 

Graduate Staff 

TX 699 Textile Research. Credits Arranged. Problems of specific interest to the textile in- 
dustry will be assigned for study and investigation. The use of experimental methods will be 
emphasized. Attention will be given to the preparation of reports for publication. The 
master's thesis may be based upon the data obtained. Graduate Staff 



Toxicology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professors: W. C. Dauterman, W. E. Donaldson, D. S. Grosch, F. E. Guthrie, D. W. 
Hayne, E. Hodgson, A. R. Main, R. J. Monroe, J. J. Perry, T. J. Sheets; Pro) 
USDA: D. E. Moreland; Adjunct Professor: J. R. Fouts; Associate Professor: (',. 
T. Barthalmus; Adjunct Assistant Professor: R. M. Philpot 



262 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

The combined impact of population increase and urbanization has magnified the 
problem of environmental contamination in recent years. As technology attempts 
to keep pace with the increased demands of our complex civilization, additional tox- 
icants will be introduced which may affect man and other animals. The need for in- 
creased scrutiny of toxic agents and an understanding of their mode of toxic action 
(especially in trace amounts) is evidenced by recent findings summarized in many 
reports by government and professional organizations. 

A graduate minor in toxicology at the master's or doctoral level provides the 
coordination necessary to offer the student a background in toxicology. This is an 
interdepartmental program which draws faculty from the departments of 
biochemistry, botany, crop science, entomology, genetics, microbiology, poultry 
science, statistics and zoology, Students majoring in these and related subject mat- 
ter departments may elect the toxicology minor. 

Requirements for a minor at the M.S. level will be either TOX 510 or TOX 515 
and for the Ph.D. degree both TOX 510 and TOX 515. Additional courses from the 
supplementary list will be added at the discretion of the faculty member 
representing the minor (the same faculty member cannot represent both the major 
and minor). The supplementary list includes: BCH 452, CH 428, GN (ZO) 532, BCH 
551, BCH 557, BCH 652, ST 511, ZO 614 and ENT 622. 

The toxicology minor program is administered by a toxicology advisory commit- 
tee whose chairmanship is on a rotational basis. Additional information about the 
program may be obtained by writing to one of the faculty mentioned above. 

TOX 510 Biochemical Toxicology. Preqs.: Biochemistry, sr. standing. 3(3-0) F. Emphasis 
is placed on the molecular events that occur during the toxic action of xenobiotics, including 
penetration phenomena, mechanisms involved in detoxication, and the mechanisms of action 
at the target site. 

TOX 515 Environmental Toxicology. Preq.: Two years of biology. 3(3-0) S. The nature, 
distribution and significance of microchemical contamination will be evaluated. Emphasis 
will be placed on current, relevant problems. 

TOX 590 Special Problems in Toxicology. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1-3. 

TOX 690 Toxicology Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) S. 



Urban Design 

For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see page 58. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

UD 501 Introductory Problems in Urban Design. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(0-6) F. In- 
troduction to descriptive analysis of physical and socio-economic phenomena of urban en- 
vironments, and application of research methods in the definition and resolution of urban 
design problems. 

UD 502 Urban Design Workshop I. Preq.: UD 501. 3(0-6) S. A complete synthesis of 
design factors influencing an environmental system or an urban complex. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 263 

UD 510 Theory of Urban Form. Preq.: Grad. standing or advanced undergrad. standing. 
3(3-0) S. Survey of interdisciplinary theory of urban growth and evolution with about one- 
half of the class periods devoted to historical development of theory, and the other half 
devoted to contemporary quantitative models of urban form. 

UD 520 Theory and Principles of Urban Design. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. An ex- 
amination of the nature of the design process in urban environments with special emphasis 
on contemporary theory and practice. 

UD 530 Programming and Design Criteria for Community Development. Preq.: Ad- 
vanced undergrad. or grad. standing, or CI. 3(2-1) F,S. This course is designed to reveal the 
programmatic requirements of communities in terms of density, size, physical structure and 
evolutionary characteristics of urban populations, and provides the designer and planner 
with estimates of the projected demand for facilities and services. 

UD 590 Special Topics in Urban Design I. Preq.: Fourth year standing. 1-6 F,S. This 
course provides a flexible means for investigation into areas of special interest related to ur- 
ban design. It is intended primarily to encourage independent study and research. 

UD 595 Environmental Perception. Preq.: Grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. The course is 
designed to acquaint the student with the theories and research on the perception of urban 
environments. Emphasis is placed on the visual attributes as well as user perceptions of the 
environment with a focus on the structuring of research to explore these dimensions. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

UD 601 Urban Design Workshop II. Preq.: UD 502. 6(0-12) F. Analysis of complex en- 
vironmental problems ranging in scale from area redevelopment to new towns design. 

UD 602 Advanced Problems in Urban Design. Preq.: UD 601. 6(0-12) S. Investigation of 
current urban design problems with special emphasis on individual research and investiga- 
tion. 

UD 690 Special Topics in Urban Design II. Preqs.: Interdisciplinary core and integrative 
core in urban design. 1-6 F,S. A course designed to allow for independent study and research 
in areas of special interest for graduate students in urban design only. 



Veterinary Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor T. M. Curtin, Head 

Professors: E. G. Batte, W. M. Colwell, D. J. Moncol; Associate Professor: R. C. 
Dillman, D. G. Simmons; Adjunct Associate Professor: E. E. McConnell; Adjunct 
Assistant Professor: A. W. Macklin 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professor: R. F. Behlow; Extension Professor: J. R. Harris; Associate Professor: K 

E. Muse 



264 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

The veterinary science faculty offers instruction at advanced undergraduate and 
graduate levels. Courses are designed to support other departments of the institu- 
tion, giving students a background in animal health, poultry health and laboratory 
animal care. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES COURSES 

VET (PO) 401 Poultry Diseases. 4(3-3) S. 

VET (ANS) 420 Diseases of Farm Animals. Preqs.: CH 101, 103. 3(3-0) S. 

VET 490 Special Topics in Veterinary Science. Preq.: Jr. standing. 1-6 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

VET (MB, PO, PHY) 505 Immunobiology. 3(3-0) S. (See poultry science, page 226.) 

VET 590 Advanced Special Topics in Veterinary Science. Preq.: Sr. or grad. standing or 
CI. 1-3 F,S. A course offered as needed to cover new or special subject matter within the 
scope of veterinary science at the graduate level. Graduate Staff 



Water Resources 

(An interdepartmental, intercampus graduate program) 

WATER RESOURCES COMMITTEE-RALEIGH CAMPUS 

Dr. E. H. Wiser (Biological and Agricultural Engineering), Chairman 

Dr. W. J. Block (Politics), Dr. J. W. Gilliam (Soil Science), Dr. Neil S. Grigg 
(Water Resources Research Institute)— Secretary, Dr. D. W. Hayne (Statistics), 
Dr. M. T. Huish (Zoology), Dr. V. A. Jones (Food Science), Dr. T. E. Maki 
(Forestry), Dr. D. B. Marsland (Chemical Engineering), Dr. Gary N. Mock (Tex- 
tile Chemistry), Dr. H. H. Neunzig (Entomology), Dr. J. A. Seagraves 
(Economics and Business), Dr. E. D. Seneca (Botany), Dr. T. J. Sheets (Pesticide 
Residue Research Laboratory), Prof. C. Smallwood (Civil Engineering), Dr. C. 
W. Welby (Geosciences), Prof. R. R. Wilkinson (Landscape Architecture). 

Water resources management is a major issue throughout the country, and 
national policy supports strong water resources programs at all levels of govern- 
ment. These are multidisciplinary and require understanding of the complex ef- 
fects of conservation and development. They require well-trained specialists in 
engineering and the physical, biological and social sciences who also possess a 
sound grasp of overall objectives and a full appreciation of the respective roles of 
the participating disciplines. 

Water resources is generally considered to be an area of specialization and not a 
discipline. Graduate education provides an opportunity for broad exposure to 
water-related subjects along with intense study in the major disciplines. Students 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 166 

are encouraged to reach beyond their own departments for courses to extend their 
range of understanding and to participate in water resources courses and seminars 
designed to develop interdisciplinary communication and a basis for future work- 
ing relationships. 

A large number of courses related to water resources conservation, development 
and management are currently offered on the North Carolina State University and 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill campuses. In order to capitalize on the 
combined educational resources of both campuses and to offer them in an 
organized way to graduate students seeking interdisciplinary education in this 
field, an intercampus graduate minor in water resources has been established. 

The program offers a strong graduate minor in water resources, with the major 
in any of the basic disciplines contributing to water resources planning, conserva- 
tion, development and management. The graduate courses currently offered on 
both campuses have been separated into the following general areas: water law and 
institutions, planning of water resources and related systems, municipal and in- 
dustrial water management, agricultural and forest water management, aquatic 
biology and ecology, hydrology and hydrogeology. 

Graduate students majoring in any discipline closely allied with one of the 
designated water resource areas will be qualified for admission to the program. 
They will be expected to select their water resources minor courses from one or 
more areas outside their major. The cohesive elements in the graduate program 
will be two interdisciplinary core courses including a water resources seminar and 
a course in water resources planning or water resources economics. 

The minimal course requirements for a graduate minor in water resources are: 
Master's Degree — The two core courses in water resources plus two courses in 
water resource areas outside the major discipline approved by the student's ad- 
visory committee; Ph.D. Degree — The two core courses in water resources plus five 
other courses in water resource areas outside the major discipline approved by the 
student's advisory committee. The complete listing of courses available under this 
program follow. 



266 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

WATER RESOURCES CORE COURSES 



*Campus 


Course 


R 


CE591 




or 


CH 


ENVR 183 


R 


EB 515 




or 


CH 


PLAN 234 (ENVR 284) 


LAW AND INSTITUTIONS OF WA1 


R 


PS 511 


R 


PS 612 


R 


PS 516 


R 


PS 613 


CH 


PLAN 230 


CH 


ENVR 283 (PLAN 233)** 


CH 


POLI 101*** 


CH 


POLI 209 


CH 


POLI 213 


CH 


POLI 214 


CH 


POLI 238 


CH 


POLI 181 



PLANNING OF WATER RESOURCES 

R CE575** 

R EB401 

R EB435 

R EB436 

R EB 490 

CH ENVR 21 5 

CH ENVR 217** 



CH 
CH 
CH 
CH 

CH 
CH 
CH 



ENVR 277 

ENVR 278 
GEOG 156 
PLAN 214 

PLAN 219 

PLAN 232 (ENVR 282)** 

PLAN 241 



Title 

Civil Engineering Seminar. (Water Resources 

Seminar) 

Water Resources Seminar. 

Water Resources Economics. 

Planning of Natural Resource and Environ- 
mental Systems. (Including Water Resource 

Systems) 



Public Administration. 

The Budgetary Process. 

Public Policy Analysis. 

Government and Planning. 

Planning Law. 

Natural Resource Law and Policy. 

Public Administration. 

Planning and Government. 

Public Administration and Policy Making. 

Budgeting and Financial Management. 

Intergovernmental Relations. 

National Policy and Administration. 

AND RELATED SYSTEMS 
Civil Engineering Systems. 
Economic Analysis for Non-majors. 
Urban Economics. 
Environmental Economics. 
Senior Seminar in Economics. 
Environmental Issues and Assessment. 
Systems Analysis in Environmental Plan- 
ning. 

Engineering Project Design. 
Development of a Water Project. 
Geography of Natural Resources. 
Analytical Methods for Public Investment 
Analysis. 

Environmental Systems Analysis. 
Public Investment Theory. 
Environmental Planning. 



MUNICIPAL AND INDUSTRIAL WATER MANAGEMENT 



R 
R 
R 

R 
R 

R 

R 



BAE (CE) 578 
CE484 

CE486 

CE571 
CE572 
CE573 

CE (NE) 574 

CE671 



of 



Agricultural Waste Management. 

Water Resources Engineering II. 

Sanitary Engineering Measurements 

Water Quality. 

Theory of Water and Waste Treatment. 

Design of Water and Wastewater Facilities. 

Unit Operations and Processes in Waste 

Treatment. 

Environmental Consequences of Nuclear 

Power. 

Advanced Water Management Systems. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



267 



Title 

Advanced Water and Waste Treatment: Prin- 
ciples and Design. 

Industrial Water Supply and Waste Disposal. 
Stream Sanitation. 

The Textile Industry and the Environment. 
Seminar in Food Science. 
Pollution Abatement in Forest Products 
Industries. 
Water Chemistry. 
Environmental Microbiology. 
Principles of Water Quality Management. 
Water and Waste Treatment Processes. 
Workshop in Water Quality Management. 
Hydraulics and Hydrology. 
Trace Analysis. 

Engineering Models for Aquatic Systems. 
Technology of Engineered Water Systems. 
Water and Wastewater Treatment Plant 
Design. 

Industrial Water Quality Management. 
Natural Resource and Environmental 
Systems in Urban Areas. 

AGRICULTURAL AND FOREST WATER MANAGEMENT 

R BAE (SSC) 321 Water Management. 

R BAE (SSC) 471 Agricultural Water Management. 

R FOR 452 Silvics. 

R FOR 472 Renewable Resource Management. 

R FOR 501 Forest Influences and Watershed Manage- 

ment. 
R FOR 692 Advanced Forest Management Problems. 

R SSC 461 Soil Physical Properties and Plant Growth. 



*Campus 


Course 


R 


CE672 


R 


CE673 


R 


CE674 


R 


TC401 


R 


FS690 


R 


WPS 525 


CH 


ENVR 122 


CH 


ENVR 134** 


CH 


ENVR 171** 


CH 


ENVR 174 


CH 


ENVR 172 


CH 


ENVR 176 


CH 


ENVR 223 


CH 


ENVR 271 


CH 


ENVR 272** 


CH 


ENVR 273 


CH 


ENVR 276 


CH 


PLAN 140 



AQUATIC BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY 



R 


BAE (CE, MB) 570 


R 


BO(ZO)560** 


R 


BO (MB) 574 


R 


BO 662 


R 


MAS (ZO) 529 


R 


MAS 693 


R 


ZO420 


R 


Z0 519** 


R 


ZO 592B 


R 


ZO 592C 


R 


Z0 619 


R 


Z0 621 


CH 


BOTN114 


CH 


BOTN 141 


CH 


BOTN216 


CH 


ENVR 123 


CH 


ENVR 132** 


CH 


ENVR 137 


CH 


ENVR 128 (MSCS 105) 



Sanitary Microbiology. 

Principles of Ecology. 

Phycology. 

Applied Coastal Ecology. 

Biological Oceanography. 

Special Topics in Marine Sciences. (Estuarine 

Ecology) 

Fishery Science. 

Limnology. 

Topical Problems — Aquaculture. 

Topical Problems — Underwater 

Photography. 

Advanced Limnology. 

Fishery Science. 

Algae. 

Ecology. 

Marine Algae. 

Organic Materials in Natural Waters. 

Limnology and Water Pollution. 

Ecology of Wetlands. 

Chemical Oceanography. 



268 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



"Campus 



Course 



Title 



CH 


ENVR224 


Chemical Models of Aquatic Systems. 


CH 


ENVR231 


Lim no logical Methods. 


CH 


ENVR233 


Microbial Ecology. 


CH 


ENVR235 


Ecology of Phytoplankton. 


CH 


ZOOL 108 


Ecology. 


CH 


ZOOL 109** 


Introduction to Hydrobiology. 


CH 


ZOOL 126 (MSCS 101)** 


Oceanography. 


CH 


ZOOL 140S (MSCS 140S) 


**Biological Oceanography. 


CH 


ZOOL 141S 


Special Problems in Marine Biology. 


CH 


ZOOL 146 


Marine Ecology. 


CH 


ZOOL 213 


Advanced Marine Ecology. 


CH 


ZOOL 226 


Ecological and General Systems Theory. 


HYDROLOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY 


R 


BAE (SSC) 671 


Theory of Drainage — Saturated Flow. 


R 


BAE (SSC) 674 


Theory of Drainage— Unsaturated Flow. 


R 


CE383** 


Water Resources Engineering I. 


R 


CE580 


Flow in Open Channels. 


R 


CE (MAS) 581 


Introduction to Oceanographic Engineering, 


R 


CE644 


Ground Water Engineering. 


R 


GY400 


Environmental Geology. 


R 


GY563 


Applied Sedimentary Analysis. 


R 


GY565** 


Hydrogeology. 


R 


GY567 


Geochemistry. 


R 


GY581 


Geomorphology. 


R 


OY (MAS, CE) 487 


Physical Oceanography. 


R 


GY (MAS) 584 


Marine Geology. 


R 


MY 411 


Introductory Meteorology. 


R 


MY 555 


Meteorology of the Biosphere. 


R 


SSC 511 


Soil Physics. 


CH 


ENVR281 


Topics in Advanced Hydrology. 


CH 


GEOG110 


Meteorology. 


CH 


GEOG112 


Micrometeorology. 


CH 


GEOG 115 


Climatology. 


CH 


GEOG117 


Soils. 


CH 


GEOG 156 


Natural Resources. 


CH 


GEOL 104 


Geomorphology. 


CH 


GEOL 142 


Principles of Geochemistry. 


CH 


GEOL 173 (MSCS 103) 


Geological Oceanography. 


CH 


GEOL 242 


Physical Geochemistry. 


CH 


GEOL 247 


Sedimentation. 


CH 


GEOL 250 


Advanced Sedimentation. 


CH 


MSCS 102 


Physical Oceanography. 


CH 


MSCS 206 


Seminar on Oceanography. 



Requests for information regarding the water resources graduate programs 
should be directed to the Chairman of the Water Resources Committee, the depart- 
ments represented on the Water Resources Committee, or the Water Resources 
Research Institute, 124 Riddick Building, North Carolina State University, 
Raleigh, N. C. 27607. 

* Courses bearing the prefix "R" are taught at Raleigh and those bearing "CH" at Chapel Hill. Unlisted courses can be 

substituted for listed courses with the approval of the student's advisory committee. 
** Courses from which requirements for master's degree minor will normally be met. Substitutions can be made with ap- 
proval of the student's advisory committee. 
*** Prerequisites can be waived for graduate students with water resources minor. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 269 

Wood and Paper Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor I. S. Goldstein, Head 

Professors: A. C. Barefoot, Jr., R. M. Carter, H. Chang, E. B. Cowling, E. L. 
Ellwood, J. S. Gratzl, C. A. Hart, R. G. Hitchings, M. P. Levi, R. G. Pearson, R. J. 
Thomas; Professor Emeritus: A. J. Stamm; Adjunct Professors: L. L. Edwards, 
K. P. Kringstad, P. Koch, W. T. McKean Jr., R. P. Singh; Associate Professors. 
R. H. Reeves, D. H. J. Steensen; Associate Professor Emeritus: C. G. Landes; 
Adjunct Associate Professor: T. K. Kirk; Assistant Professors: M. W. Kelly, V. 
Venkatakrishnan; Visiting Assistant Professor: E. A. Wheeler; Research 
Associate: C. L. Chen 

Graduate study programs leading to the Master of Science and the Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees are offered for students in a wide variety of areas in the field of 
wood and paper science. The Master of Wood and Paper Science is available for stu- 
dents who do not wish to emphasize research in their graduate study programs. 

Because the field of wood and paper science is a derived science, considerable 
emphasis is placed upon developing a strong minor in the graduate program in any 
one or more of the supporting disciplines such as organic chemistry, polymer 
chemistry, chemical engineering, mathematics, statistics, biology, engineering 
mechanics, mechanical engineering, physics, economics or business administra- 
tion. 

Areas of study and research in pulp and paper science and technology' cover wood 
and fiber chemistry, lignin and carbohydrate chemistry, pulping chemistry, pollu- 
tion abatement processes, fiber and paper properties, and paper coatings and ad- 
ditives. In wood science and technology, study and research areas include wood 
physics (especially wood liquid relations), wood chemistry, wood biology, wood 
mechanics and engineering, manufacturing processes, operations research applica- 
tions, wood industry economics and marketing. 

Modern facilities are completely equipped to conduct education and research in 
all forms of wood and fiber processing. Included are specialized laboratories for 
study of wood physics, wood anatomy, wood processing, wood engineering, wood 
chemistry, pulping, papermaking, paper testing and paper coating. Equipment 
available includes optical and electron microscopes, a range of spectrophotometers, 
gas and liquid chromatographs, an ultracentrifuge, membrane osmometers, elec- 
tron spin resonance and nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus. 

The prerequisite for graduate study in the department is an undergraduate 
degree in wood science, pulp and paper science or in related disciplines such as any 
of a number of branches of science or engineering. 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

WPS 403 Paper Process Analysis. Preqs.: WPS 321, 322. 3(0-6) S. 

WPS 411, 412 Pulp and Paper Unit Processes I and II. Preqs.: CHE 301 and 302 8(8-0) 

F ( S. 



270 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

WPS 413 Paper Properties and Additives. Preq.: Sr. Standing. 3(1-6) F. 

WPS (FOR) 423 Logging and Milling. Preq.: Jr. Standing. 3(2-3) F. 

WPS 434 Wood Operations. Preqs.: WPS 301, 302. 3(2-3) F. 

WPS 441 Introduction to Wood Mechanics. Preqs.: MA 212, PY 221 or 211. 3(3-0) F. 

WPS 442 Wood Mechanics and Design. Preq.: ESM 211 or WPS 441. 3(2-3) S. 

WPS 471 Pulping Process Analysis. Preq.: WPS 321. 3(1-6) F. 

WPS 481 Pulping Processes and Products. Preqs.: WPS 202, CH 103. 2(2-0) S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

WPS 513 Tropical Woods. Preqs.: WPS 203, 301. 2(1-3) F. Structure, identification, 
properties, characteristics and use of tropical woods, especially those used in plywood and 
furniture. Graduate Staff 

WPS 521, 522 Chemistry of Wood and Wood Products. Preqs.: CH 315, CH 331, WPS 
202, PY 212. 3(2-3) F,S. Fundamental chemistry and physics of wood and wood components; 
pulping principles, electrical and thermal properties. Graduate Staff 

WPS 525 Pollution Abatement in Forest Products Industries. Preq.: Grad. or advanced 
undergrad. standing in science or engineering curricula. 3(3-0) S. Pollution sources, inplant 
control and treatment of water and air pollution in forest products with concentration on the 
pulp and paper industry. Venkatakrishnan 

WPS 533 Advanced Wood Anatomy. Preq.: WPS 202 or CI. 3(1-6) Alt. S. Fundamental 
wood anatomy and cell wall ultrastructure. Laboratory techniques for light and electron 
microscopic studies of wood. Graduate Staff 

WPS 540 Wood Composites. Preqs.: WPS 441; grad. or advanced undergrad. standing. 
3(3-0) Alt. S. This course is designed to acquaint advanced undergraduate and graduate stu- 
dents with the rapidly expanding field of wood composites. Production processes for par- 
ticleboard, plywood, hardboard, fiberboard, and other wood composites are presented. 
Elastic theory for the stiffness, strength, and buckling resistance of composites will be 
developed. Test procedures for determining mechanical properties and design procedures for 
glued laminated members, panel products, and built-up members, including I- and box- 
beams, stressed-skin panels and sandwich panels, will be outlined. Graduate Staff 

WPS 591 Wood and Paper Science Problems. Preq.: Sr. or grad. standing. Credits 
Arranged. Assigned or selected problems in the field of silviculture, logging, lumber 
manufacturing, pulp technology or forest management. Graduate Staff 

WPS 599 Methods of Research in Wood and Paper Science. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. 
or grad. standing. Credits Arranged. Research procedures, problem outlines, presentation of 
results; consideration of selected studies by forest research organizations; sample plot 
techniques. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

WPS 604 Timber Physics. Preq.: WPS 441. 3(3-0) F,S. Density, specific gravity and 
moisture content variation affecting physical properties; physics of drying at high and low 
temperatures; thermal, sound, light and electrical properties of wood. Hart 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 271 

WPS 606 Wood Process Analysis. Preq.: WPS 604. 3(3-0) F. Analysis of wood process 
through the solution of comprehensive problems involving the physics of temperature and 
moisture relations. Graduate Staff 

WPS 691 Graduate Seminar. Preq.: Grad. standing. 1(1-0) F,S. Presentation and discus- 
sion of progress reports on research, special problems and outstanding publications. 

Graduate Staff 

WPS 693 Advanced Wood Technology Problems. Preq.: Grad. standing. Credits 
Arranged. Selected problems in the field of wood technology. Graduate Staff 

WPS 699 Problems and Research. Preq.: Grad. standing. Credits Arranged. Specific 
problems that will furnish material for a thesis. 

Graduate Staff 



Zoology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. G. Vandenbergh, Head 

Professors: F. S. Barkalow Jr., P. C. Bradbury, B. J. Copeland, D. S. Grosch, R. 
Harkema, W. W. Hassler, D. W. Hayne, C. F. Lytle, B. S. Martof, G. C. Miller, T. 
L. Quay, J. F. Roberts, D. E. Smith; Professors Emeriti: B. B. Brandt, D. E. 
Davis L. E. Mettler; Adjunct Professors: J. E. Hobbie, T. R. Rice, P. N. Witt; 
Associate Professors: G. T. Barthalmus, J. D. Hair, M. T. Huish (USDI), S. C. 
Mozley, K. E. Muse, J. M. Whitsett; Adjunct Associate Professors: F. A. Cross, D. 
E. Gardner, G. R. Huntsman; Assistant Professors: P. D. Doerr, W. C. Grant, J. 
H. Kerby (USDI), J. M. Miller, 0. T. Sanders, H. A. Underwood Jr., T. G. 
Wolcott; Adjunct Assistant Professors: R. L. Ferguson, D. E. Hoss, D. S. Peters, 
L. R. Reiter, R. McL. Shelley, G. W. Thayer; Visiting Assistant Professor: W. L. 
Rickards III 

The Department of Zoology offers to qualified students the opportunity to earn 
the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Students may 
specialize in many areas: behavior, general ecology, population dynamics, lim- 
nology, marine biology, fisheries biology, wildlife biology, ecological life histories 
of parasites, morphology and systematics of vertebrates, cellular, reproductive and 
comparative physiology and endocrinology. For certain specialities, a master's 
degree without a thesis is available. 

The department is located in Gardner Hall where facilities for research activities 
are available. Opportunity for many types of ecological studies is provided in the 
extensive natural areas of state parks, a 200 ha field research area 10 km from 
campus containing various types of vegetation and a pond, and at various private, 
state, and federal laboratories associated with the department. 



272 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

SELECTED ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATE COURSES 

ZO (ENT) 401 Bibliographic Research in Biology. Preq.: Advanced undergrad. or grad. 
standing. 1(1-0) F,S. 

ZO (BO) 414 Cell Biology. Preqs.: CH 223, PY 212, ZO 201 or ZO 203. 3(3-0) F. 

ZO 415 Cellular and Animal Physiology Laboratory. Coreq.: ZO 414 or ZO 421. 2(0-5) 
F,S. 

ZO 420 Fishery Science. Preqs.: ZO 201 or ZO 203; ZO 360. 3(2-2) F. 

ZO 421 Vertebrate Physiology. Preqs.: CH 223, PY 212, ZO 201 or ZO 203. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ZO 441 Ichthyology. Preqs.: ZO 201 or ZO 203, jr. standing. 3(3-0). 

ZO 442 Ichthyology Laboratory. Preq.: ZO 201 or 203; Coreqs.: ZO 441, jr. standing. 1(0-3) 
S. 

ZO 490 Special Topics in Zoology. Preq.: Jr. standing. 3(2-1) F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ZO 501 Ornithology. Preqs.: ZO 323 or 203, ZO 421. 3(2-3) F,S. The biology of birds: 
systematics, physiology, life histories, ecology and behavior. Quay 

ZO (PSY) 503 Comparative Psychology. 3(3-0) S. (See psychology, page 230.) 

ZO 510 Adaptive Behavior of Animals. Preq.: ZO 421 or CI. 4(3-3) F. The comparative 
study of animal behavior including a treatment of physiological mechanisms and adaptive 
significance. Both invertebrates and vertebrates are studied. Whitsett 

ZO (PHY) 513 Comparative Physiology. Preq.: ZO 421 or CI. 4(3-3) S. A comparative 
study of the organ systems of vertebrates and the physiological processes involved in main- 
taining the homeostatic state. The various compensatory mechanisms employed during en- 
vironmental stress are included. Underwood 

ZO 515 Growth and Reproduction of Fishes. Preqs. or coreqs.: GN 411, ZO 420, 421, 441. 
3(2-3) S. The biology of fishes: physiology, anatomy, pathology, behavior and genetics. This 
course is designed especially for graduate students in fisheries. Several trips to research 
laboratories are taken. (Offered S 1979 and alt. years.) Huish 

ZO 517 Population Ecology. Preqs.: ZO (BO) 360 and ST 511 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. The 
dynamics of natural populations. Current work, theories and problems dealing with popula- 
tion growth, fluctuation, limitation and patterns of dispersion, the ecological niche, food 
chains and energy flow. Emphasis on methods of study. Hayne 

ZO 519 Limnology. Preq.: ZO (BO) 360 or equivalent. 4(3-3) F. A study of inland waters. 
Lectures dealing with physical, chemical and biological factors that affect freshwater 
organisms. General principles are illustrated in the laboratory and on field trips. Mozley 

ZO (PO) 524 Comparative Endocrinology. 4(3-3) S. (See poultry science, page 226.) 

ZO (MAS) 529 Biological Oceanography. Preq.: ZO (BO) 360 or CI. 3(3-0) F. A com- 
prehensive course stressing the dynamic interrelationships between organisms of the sea 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 273 

and their physical and chemical environment. The latter part of the course will examine fun- 
damental concepts in biological oceanography and will particularly stress experimental 
methods. j M M ill er 

ZO (GN) 532 Biological Effects of Radiations. 3(3-0) S. (See genetics, page 150.) 

ZO (GN) 540 Evolution. 3(3-0) F. (See genetics, page 150.) 

ZO 542 Herpetology. Preqs.: ZO 323 or 203, ZO 421. 3(2-3) S. The biology of the amphi- 
bians and reptiles: systematics, life history, anatomy, behavior, physiology and ecology. 

Martof 

ZO 544 Mammalogy. Preqs.: ZO 323 or ZO 203, CI. 3(2-3) S. The classification, identifica- 
tion and ecology of the major groups of mammals. Barkalow 

ZO (GN) 550 Experimental Evolution. 3(3-0) F. (See genetics, page 150.) 

ZO 553 Principles of Wildlife Science. Preq.: ZO (BO) 360. 3(2-3) F. The principles of 
wildlife management and their application are studied in the laboratory and in the field. 

Doerr 

ZO 554 Wildlife Field Studies. Preqs.: ZO 553, ST 311; CI. 3(2-3) S. Field application of 
methods for studying vertebrate wildlife populations; sampling methods, data gathering, 
analysis, and interpretation of results are practiced. Participation in field laboratories and 
one or two weekend field trips is required. Doerr 

ZO (MB) 555 Protozoology. Preq.: CI. 4(2-6) S. The biology of the Protozoa: lectures in- 
clude morphology, physiology, ecology, genetics, reproduction, evolution, systematics and 
life-cycles of both free-living and parasitic taxa; laboratory will stress recognition of selected 
forms and demonstrate techniques used to prepare specimens for microscopic examination. 

Bradbury 

ZO (BO) 560 Principles of Ecology. Preq.: Three semesters of college-level biology 
courses. 4(3-3) F. A consideration of the principles of ecology at the graduate level. Each of 
the major subject areas of ecology is developed in sufficient depth to provide a factual and 
philosophical framework for the understanding of ecology. Graduate Staff 

ZO (PHY, ENT) 575 Physiology of Invertebrates. 3(3-0) S. (See physiology, page 215.) 

ZO 581 Helminthology. Preqs.: ZO 323 or 203, ZO 315 or equivalent. 4(2-4) F. The study of 
the morphology, biology and control of the parasitic helminths. G. C. Miller 

ZO (ENT) 582 Medical and Veterinary Entomology. 3(2-3) S. (See entomology, page 138.) 

ZO 590 Special Studies. Preqs.: Twelve hours ZO, CI. Credits Arranged. F,S. A directed 
individual investigation of a particular problem in zoology, accompanied by a review of the 
pertinent literature. A maximum of three hours is allowed toward the master's degree. 

Graduate Staff 

ZO 592 Topical Problems. Preq.: CI. 1-3 F,S. Organized, formal lectures and discussion of 
a special topic. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ZO 603 Advanced Parasitology. Preq.: ZO 581. 3(2-3) S. The study of the theoretical and 
practical aspects of parasitism; taxonomy, physiology and immunology of animal parasites. 

Harkema, Roberts 



274 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ZO 614 Advanced Cell Biology. Preq.: ZO (BO) 414 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. A study of the 
current problems of cell biology including the problems of the molecular organization and 
functions of membrane systems, subcellular organelles and specialized cells. (Offered 1978- 
79 and alt. years.) Roberts, Smith 

ZO 619 Advanced Limnology. Preq.: ZO 519. 3(1-6) S. A study of primary productivity, 
population interactions and effects of pollution An experimental approach is used in the 
laboratory. Mozley 

ZO 621 Fishery Science. Preqs.: ST 511, ZO 420, a course in calculus. 3(2-3) F. An analysis 
of fishery research methods. Population enumeration and dynamics. The relationship be- 
tween fluctuations in natural populations and environmental factors. (Offered 1978 and alt. 
years.) Hassler 

ZO (BO) 660 Advanced Topics in Ecology I. 4(3-3) S. (See botany, page 69.) 

ZO (BO) 661 Advanced Topics in Ecology II. Preq.: ZO (BO) 560 or equivalent. 4(3-3) S. 
Reports and seminar discussions of five major topics, such as secondary productivity, com- 
petitive exclusion, predator-prey and other interspecies relationships, regulation of popula- 
tions, physiological ecology and management of resources. Some field trips. Laboratory 
provides experience in analysis of ecological systems, modeling and computer simulation. 
(Offered 1979 and alt. years.) Graduate Staff 

ZO 690 Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. The presentation and defense of original research and current 
literature. Graduate Staff 

ZO 691 Topics in Animal Behavior. Preq.: ZO 510. 3(3-0) S. Intensive examination of 
selected aspects of animal behavior and their relationship to physiology, ecology and other 
biological fields. May be repeated for credit when topic changes. Whitsett 

ZO 699 Research in Zoology Preqs.: Twelve semester credits in ZO and CI. Credits 
Arranged. F,S. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 275 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 
North Carolina State University 

Term expires 

Walter L. Smith, Charlotte, Chairman 1981 

Grover A. Gore, Southport, Vice Chairman 1979 

Mary Virginia McFadyen, Raeford, Secretary 1979 

Robert J. Brown, High Point 1979 

Marcus B. Crotts, Winston-Salem 1981 

C. A. Dillon, Jr., Raleigh 1979 

Roy H. Park, Ithaca, N.Y. 1981 

Philip H. Pitts, Glen Alpine 1979 

Dr. J. W. Pou, Athens, Ga. 1981 

Zeno 0. Ratcliff, Jr., Pantego 1979 

Lexie L. Ray, Haw River 1981 

George M. Wood, Camden 1981 
Bias Phillip Arroyo, President, Student Government, NCSU 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

The University of North Carolina 



William A. Johnson, Lillington, Chairman 

Mrs. Howard Holderness, Greensboro, Vice Chairman 

E. B. Turner, Lumberton, Secretary 

Term expires 

Class of 1979 

Mrs. Kathleen R. Crosby, Charlotte William A. Johnson, Lillington 

Dr. Hugh S. Daniel Jr., Waynesville Robert L. Jones, Raleigh 

William A. Dees, Jr., Goldsboro E. B. Turner, Lumberton 

Jacob H. Froelich, Jr., High Point Mrs. George D. Wilson, Fayetteville 

Class of 1981 

Hugh Cannon, Raleigh Luther H. Hodges, Jr., Charlotte 

Philip G. Carson, Asheville Mrs. Hugh Morton, Linville 

T. Worth Coltrane, Asheboro J. J- Sansom, Jr., Raleigh 

George Watts Hill, Durham David J. Whitchard, II, Greenville 



276 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Class of 1983 

Irwin Belk, Charlotte John R. Jordan, Jr., Raleigh 

Wayne Corpening, Winston-Salem J. Aaron Prevost, Hazelwood 

Daniel C. Gunter, Gastonia Louis T. Randolph, Washington 

Mrs. Howard Holderness, Greensboro Harley Shuford, Jr., Hickory 

Class of 1985 

Furman P. Bodenheimer, Cary Mrs. John L. McCain, Wilson 

Laurence A. Cobb, Charlotte Reginald F. McCoy, Laurinburg 

Charles Z. Flack, Jr., Forest City William D. Mills, Maysville 

James E. Holmes, Winston-Salem Maceo A. Sloan, Durham 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 277 

GRADUATE FACULTY* 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY 

Leon E. Abbas, Visiting Assistant Professor of Economics and Business and Recreation 
Resources Administration. Ph D., Oregon State University. 

Angela Rudy A bbate, Associate Professor of Design. M.L. A., University of Pennsylvania. 

Charlie Frank Abrams Jr., Assistant Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 
Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Daniel Morton Adams Jr., Associate Professor of Food Science. Ph.D., University of Min- 
nesota. 

Helen Lynn Adkins, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology Ph.D., University 
of Pittsburgh. 

Elsayed M. Afify, Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Ph.D., 
University of Michigan. 

Merritt James Aldrich Jr., Assistant Professor of Geosciences. Ph.D., University of New 
Mexico. 

Richard S. Altman, Visiting Lecturer (part-time) of Landscape Architecture. M.Arch., 
Washington University. 

Raul Eduardo Alvarez, Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering. M.S., North Carolina 
State University. 

John Thomas Ambrose, Assistant Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Michael Amein, Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Charles Eugene Anderson, Professor of Botany. Ph.D., Purdue University. 

Clifton A. Anderson, Professor Emeritus of Industrial Engineering. Ph.D., Ohio State Uni- 
versity. 

Donald Benton Anderson, Professor Emeritus of Botany. Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Griffin Y. Anderson, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 
M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Norman Dean Anderson, Professor of Science Education Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Charles S. Apperson, Assistant Professor of Entomology Ph.D., University of California, 
Riverside. 

Jay Lawrence Apple, Professor of Plant Pathology and Genetics and Associate Director for 
Research, International Programs. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Carter Michael Armstrong, Assistant Professor of Physics. Ph.D., University of Maryland. 

Ernest S. Armstrong Jr., Adjunct Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace 
Engineering. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Frank Bradley Armstrong, University Professor of Genetics, Microbiology and 
Biochemistry. Ph.D., University of California. 

William Dwight Armstrong, Assistant Professor of Animal Science. Ph.D., Purdue Univer- 
sity. 

Satya Pal Singh Arya, Associate Professor of Meteorology. Ph.D., Colorado State Univer- 
sity. 

Leonard William Aurand, Professor of Food Science and Biochemistry. Ph.D., Pennsylvania 
State University. 

Williard Timothy Austin, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Georgia. 

William Wyatt Austin Jr., Professor of Materials Engineering and Head of the Department. 
Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 



* Membership in the graduate faculty may be in either of two categories: (D full status 
or (2) associate status. Full status permits a faculty member to engage in any and all 
phases of the graduate programs of the University. Associate members may teach 
courses at the graduate level and serve as chairmen of master's advisory committees. 



278 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Charles Wilson Averre III, Professor of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., Purdue University. 

Richard Charles Axtell, Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Robert Ay cock. Professor of Plant Pathology and Horticultural Science and Head of the 
Department of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Mahmoud Amin Ayoub, Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering. Ph.D., Texas 
Technological University. 

Willard Farting ton Babcock, Professor of Civil Engineering. S.M., Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology. 

Walter Debele Bach Jr., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Meteorology. Ph.D., University of 
Oklahoma. 

James Ronald Bailey, Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Ph.D., 
University of Southampton. 

John Albert Bailey, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Ph.D., University 
College of Swansea. 

Barbara J. Baines, Assistant Professor of English. Ph.D., Ohio University. 

Jack Vernon Baird, Extension Professor and Specialist in Charge for Soil Science. Ph.D., 
Washington State University. 

James Robert Baker, Associate Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., University of Kansas. 

Simon Baker, Visiting Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture and Project Coor- 
dinator, Center for Urban Affairs. Ph.D., Clark University. 

Brenda C. Ball, Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychology. Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

David Stafford Ball, Associate Professor of Economics. Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill. 

Hershell Ray Ball Jr., Associate Professor of Food Science. Ph.D., University of Missouri. 

Howard G. Ball, Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. Ph.D., Ohio State Uni- 
versity. 

Walter Elmer Bollinger, Professor of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., Michigan State Univer- 
sity. 

James Ralph Ballington, Assistant Professor of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

James R. Banker, Associate Professor of History. Ph.D., University of Rochester. 

William John Barclay, Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., Stanford University. 

Aldos Cortez Barefoot Jr., Professor of Wood and Paper Science, and University Studies; 
Head of the Division of University Studies and University Coordinator for Environmen- 
tal Studies. D.F., Duke University. 

Frederick Schenck Barkalow Jr., Professor of Zoology and Forestry. Ph.D., University of 
Michigan. 

James Albert Barker, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Forestry. Ph.D., North Carolina State 
University. 

James C. Barker, Extension Assistant Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 
Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 

Kenneth Reece Barker, Professor of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Key Lee Barkley, Professor Emeritus of Psychology. Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Bobby David Barnes, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., Purdue University. 

Donald Warren Barnes Jr., Assistant Professor of Architecture. M.A., University of Califor- 
nia. 

Rolin Farrar Barrett, Adjunct Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Ph.D., 
North Carolina State University. 

Elliott Roy Barrick, Professor of Animal Science. Ph.D., Purdue University. 

George Timothy Barthalmus, Associate Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 
University. 

William Victor Bartholomew, Professor Emeritus of Soil Science. Ph.D., Iowa State Univer- 
sity. 

Peter Batchelor, Associate Professor of Architecture. M.A., University of Pennsylvania. 

Edward Guy Batte, Professor of Veterinary Science and Animal Science. D.V.M., Texas A & 
M University. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 279 

Edward Louis Battiste, Adjunct Associate Professor of Statistics. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Subhash K. Batra, Associate Professor of Textile Materials and Management. Ph.D., 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. 

Gerald Robert Baughman, Associate Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 
Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

David Lee Bayless, Adjunct Associate Professor of Statistics. Ph.D., Texas A & M Univer- 
sity. 

Kenneth Orion Beatty Jr., R. J. Reynolds Industries Professor of Chemical Engineering. 
Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

Robert Lee Beckmann Jr., Assistant Professor of Botany. Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 

Safah Mohamed Bedair, Visiting Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of California at Berkeley. 

Joe Robert Beeler Jr., Professor of Nuclear Engineering and Materials Engineering. Ph.D., 
Kansas University. 

Burton Floyd Beers, Professor of History. Ph.D., Duke University. 

Bruce Gerald Beezer, Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. Ed.D., University 
of Arizona. 

William H. Beezley, Associate Professor of History. Ph.D., University of Nebraska. 

Robert Frank Behlow, Professor of Animal Science and Veterinary Science. D.V.M., Ohio 
State University. 

Norman Robert Bell, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. M.S., Cornell Univer- 
sity. 

Thomas Alexander Bell, Professor Emeritus of Food Science. M.S., North Carolina State 
University. 

Willard Harrison Bennett, Professor Emeritus of Physics. Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

David Michael Benson, Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., Colorado State Uni- 
versity. 

Ray Braman Benson Jr., Professor of Materials Engineering. Ph.D., University of California 
at Berkeley. 

Henry Albert Bent, Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 

Richard Harold Bernhard, Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering. Ph.D., Cornell 
University. 

Leonidas Judd BettsJr, Associate Professor of English and Education. Ed.D., Duke Univer- 
sity. 

Marvin Kenneth Beute, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., Michigan State Uni- 
versity. 

Glenn C. Bewley, Assistant Professor of Genetics. Ph.D., University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill. 

Bibhuti Bhushan Bhattacharyya, Professor of Statistics. Ph.D., London School of 
Economics. 

Theodore E. Bilderback, Assistant Professor of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., Kansas State 
University. 

William Louis Bingham, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., Pennsylvania 
State University. 

Francis S. Binkowski, Adjunct Associate Professor of Meteorology. Ph.D., New York Uni- 
versity. 

George Lee Bireline Jr., Professor of Design. M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill. 

John William Bishir, Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Paul Edward Bishop, Assistant Professor (USDA) of Microbiology. Ph.D., Oregon State Uni- 
versity. 

Eric L. Blair, Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering. Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic 
Institute. 

Roger Lee Blair, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Forestry. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 



280 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Carl Thomas Blake, Extension Professor of Crop Science. Ph.D., Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity. 

Philip Everett Blank Jr., Associate Professor of English. Ph.D., University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill. 

William Joseph Block, Professor of Political Science. Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

William Lowry Blow, Associate Professor Emeritus of Poultry Science. Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

Udo Blum, Associate Professor of Botany. Ph.D., University of Oklahoma. 

Thomas Nelson Blumer, Professor of Food Science. Ph.D., Michigan State College. 

John Francis Bogdan, Albert G. Myers Professor Emeritus of Textiles. B.T.E., Lowell Textile 
Institute. 

James Raymond Bohannon Jr., Associate Professor of Nuclear Engineering. M.S., North 
Carolina State University. 

Edgar John Boone, Professor of Adult and Community College Education and Head of the 
Department and Assistant Director of Agricultural Extension Service. Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin. 

Dennis D. Boos, Assistant Professor of Statistics. Ph.D., Florida State University. 

Jon Bordner, Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Ph.D., University of California at 
Berkeley. 

Charles Ben Boss, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., Indiana University. 

Carey Hoyt Bostian, Professor Emeritus of Genetics. Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 

Henry Dittimus Bowen, Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. Ph.D., 
Michigan State University. 

Lawrence Hoffman Bowen, Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 

Phyllis Clarke Bradbury, Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 

Julius Roscoe Bradley Jr., Associate Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., Louisiana State Uni- 
versity. 

Charles Raymond Bramer, Riddick Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering. E.M., Michigan 
College of Mining and Technology. 

Bartholomew Brandner Brandt, Professor Emeritus of Zoology. Ph.D., Duke University. 

Charles Henry Brett, Professor Emeritus of Entomology. Ph.D., Kansas State College. 

Richard Bright, Professor Emeritus of Chemical Engineering. M.S., State University of 
Iowa. 

Charles Aloysius Brim, Professor (USDA) of Crop Science and Genetics. Ph.D., University of 
Nebraska. 

Robert Curtis Brisson, Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

Jack Haiden Britt, Associate Professor of Animal Science. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

David A. Brooks, Research Associate in Geosciences. Ph.D., University of Miami. 

Robert Charles Brooks, Extension Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., Duke Uni- 
versity. 

Wayne Maurice Brooks, Associate Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., University of California 
at Berkeley. 

Stephen White Broome, Research Associate in Soil Science. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Henry Seawell Brown, Professor of Geosciences. Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Homer E. Brown, Adjunct Professor of Electrical Engineering. B.S., University of Min- 
nesota. 

Marvin Luther Brown Jr., Professor of History. Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Robert Sedgwick Bryan, Professor of Philosophy and Head of the Department of Philosophy 
and Religion. Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Charles Douglas Bryant, Associate Professor of Agricultural Education. Ed.D., Michigan 
State University. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 281 

Roberts Cozart Bullock. Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Carl Lee Bumgardner, Professor of Chemistry and Head of the Department. Ph.D., Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology. 

Stanley Walter Buol, Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Lawrence G. Burk, Professor (USDA) of Genetics. M.S., University of Georgia. 

Ernest Edmund Bumiston, Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., Birkbeck College, London. 

George Robert Bums, Associate Professor (USDA) of Soil Science. Ph.D., Iowa State Uni- 
versity. 

Joseph Charles Burns, Professor (USDA) of Crop Science. Ph.D., Purdue University. 

Robert Paschal Bums Jr., Professor of Architecture. M.Arch., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 

Millard P. Burt, Professor of Adult and Community College Education. Ph.D., University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

John E. Burton Jr.. Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., Iowa State 
University. 

Joseph William Burton, Assistant Professor (USDA) of Crop Science. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Thaddeus Hillery Busbice, Professor (USDA) of Crop Science. Ph.D., Iowa State University. 

Kenneth Roy Butcher, Assistant Professor of Animal Science. Ph.D., North Carolina State 
University. 

Fred Virgil CahillJr., Professor of Political Science. Ph.D., Yale University. 

Billy E. Caldwell, Professor of Crop Science and Head of the Department. Ph.D., Iowa State 
University. 

Claude E. Caldwell. Adjunct Professor of Political Science. J.D., Emory University Law 
School. 

John Tyler Caldwell, Professor Emeritus of Political Science and Chancellor Emeritus. 
Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Leon Raymond Camp, Associate Professor of Speech-Communication. Ph.D., Pennsylvania 
State University. 

Kenneth Stoddard Campbell, Professor of Textile Chemistry. B.S., Clemson University. 

Steven Lavem Campbell, Associate Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., Northwestern Univer- 
sity. 

William Vernon Campbell, Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., North Carolina State Univer- 
sity. 

John Robert Canada, Professor of Industrial Engineering. Ph.D., Georgia Institute of 
Technology. 

Thomas Franklin Cannon, Associate Professor Emeritus of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., 
Ohio State University. 

Bobby Lewis Carlile, Associate Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., Washington State Univer- 
sity. 

Gerald A. Carlson, Associate Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., University of 
California at Davis. 

Charles Hope Carlton, Associate Professor of History. Ph.D., University of California at Los 
Angeles. 

Halbert Hart Carmichael, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Graduate Administrator. 
Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 

William Lester Carpenter, Professor of Adult and Community College Education and Head 
of the Department of Agricultural Information. Ed.D., Florida State University. 

Daniel Edward Carroll Jr., Associate Professor of Food Science. Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute. 

Robert Gordon Carson Jr.. Professor Emeritus of Industrial Engineering and Associate Dean 
Emeritus of Engineering. Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

Franklin 0. Carta. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 
M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Roy Merwin Carter, Professor of Wood and Paper Science. M.S., Michigan State College. 

William Randolph Carter, Associate Professor of Philosophy. Ph.D., University of Virginia. 



282 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Edward Vitangelo Caruolo, Associate Professor of Animal Science. Ph.D., University of Min- 
nesota. 

Donald Keith Cassel, Associate Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., University of California at 
Davis. 

David Marshall Cates, Professor* of Textile Chemistry. Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Victor Viosca Cavaroc Jr., Associate Professor of Geosciences. Ph.D., Louisiana State Uni- 
versity. 

Thomas Courtney Caves, Associate Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., Columbia University. 

Douglas Scales Chamblee, Professor of Crop Science. Ph.D., Iowa State University. 

Larry Stephen Champion, Professor of English and Head of the Department. Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of North Carolina. 

Richard Edward Chandler, Professor of Mathematics and Graduate Administrator. Ph.D., 
Florida State University. 

David Webb Chaney, Professor of Textiles and Dean of the School. Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania. 

Hou-min Chang, Professor of Wood and Paper Science. Ph.D., University of Washington. 

Tien-Sun Chang, Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., University of Michigan and Univer- 
sity of Illinois. 

Allen C. Chao, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., Clemson University. 

James F. Chaplin, Professor (USDA) of Crop Science and Genetics. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Joe Senter Chappell, Associate Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Harvey Johnson Charlton, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute. 

Albert Leon Chasson, Adjunct Professor of Entomology. M. D., University of Cincinnati. 

Chen-Loung Chen, Research Associate in Wood and Paper Science. Ph.D., University of 
Heidelberg. 

Neil Chernoff, Adjunct Associate Professor of Poultry Science. Ph.D., University of Miami. 

Jason Ching, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Meteorology. Ph.D., University of Washington. 

Donna Laura Chmielewski, Assistant Professor of Psychology. Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 
University. 

Wushow Chou, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and Director of 
the Computer Studies Program. Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 

Erich Christian, Adjunct Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. Dipl. Ing., Vienna 
Institute of Technology. 

James Raymond Chromy, Adjunct Associate Professor of Statistics. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Kwong Tuzz Chung, Associate Professor of Physics. Ph.D., State University of New York. 

Lung Ock Chung, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of California at Los 
Angeles. 

Edward Depriest Clark Sr., Associate Professor of English. Ph.D., Syracuse University. 

James W. Clark Jr., Associate Professor of English. Ph.D., Duke University. 

Lawrence M. Clark, Professor of Mathematics and Science Education and Assistant Provost. 
Ed.D., University of Virginia. 

Robert L. Clark, Assistant Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., Duke University. 

Roger H. Clark, Associate Professor of Architecture and Assistant Dean of the School of 
Design. M.Arch., University of Washington. 

JohnM. Clarkson, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Bruce Bennett Clary, Assistant Professor of Political Science. Ph.D., University of Southern 
California at Los Angeles. 

Joseph Ray Clary, Associate Professor of Occupational Education and Head of the Depart- 
ment. Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Albert J. Clawson, Professor of Animal Science. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Carlyle Newton Clayton, Professor of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Maurice Hill Clayton, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Ph.D., Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 283 

William Bramwell Clifford II, Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., 

University of Kentucky. 
Grover Cleveland Cobb Jr., Associate Professor of Physics. Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
William Younts Cobb, Adjunct Associate Professor of Food Science. Ph.D., Pennsylvania 

State University. 
Harold Dean Coble, Associate Professor of Crop Science. Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Fred Denvard Cochran, Professor of Horticultural Science and Genetics, and Acting Head of 

the Department of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 
Columbus Clark Cockerham, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Statistics and Genetics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Eloise Snowden Cofer, Extension Professor of Food Science and Assistant Director, 

Agricultural Extension Service (Home Economics). Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
J. D. Cohen, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., Duke University. 
Michael A. Cohen, Assistant Professor of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., University of 

Maryland. 
James Lawrence Cole, Associate Professor of Psychology. Ph.D., Duke University. 
Robert M. Collins, Assistant Professor of History. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 
Wanda Williams Collins, Assistant Professor of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., North 

Carolina State University. 
William Kerr Collins, Professor of Crop Science. Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
David Payne Colvin, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 
William Maxwell Colwell, Professor of Veterinary Science and Poultry Science. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Georgia. 
James Lin Compton, Assistant Professor of Adult and Community College Education. Ph.D., 

University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. 
Charles J. Constantin, Assistant Professor of History. Ph.D., University of California at 

Berkeley. 
Maurice Gayle Cook, Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
Robert Edward Cook, Professor of Poultry Science and Head of the Department. Ph.D., 

North Carolina State University. 
Armand Vincent Cooke, Assistant Professor of Product Design. B.S.I.D., University of Cin- 
cinnati. 
Arthur Wells Cooper, Professor of Forestry and Botany. Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
William Douglas Cooper, Associate Professor of Textile Materials and Management and 

Economics and Business. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Alonzo Freeman Coots, Associate Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 
Will Allen Cope, Professor (USDA) of Crop Science and Genetics. Ph.D., North Carolina 

State University. 
Billy Joe Copeland, Professor of Zoology and Botany and Director, North Carolina Sea Grant 

Program. Ph.D., Oklahoma State University. 
Frederick Thomas Corbin, Associate Professor of Crop Science. Ph.D., North Carolina State 

University. 
Harold Kenneth Cordell, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Recreation Resources Administra- 
tion. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
BillieF. Corder, Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychology. Ed.D., University of Kentucky. 
Peter B. Corson, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Ph.D., University 

of Pennsylvania. 
Harold Maxwell Corter, Professor of Psychology. Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
JohnK. Coster, Professor of Occupational Education. Ph.D., Yale University. 
Stephen Robert Cotanch, Assistant Professor of Physics. Ph.D., Florida State University 
Arthur James Coutu, Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., North Carolina State 

University. 
Virginia Gutman Cowgell, Assistant Professor of Psychology. Ph.D., Duke University. 
Ellis Brevier Cowling, Professor of Plant Pathology, Forestry and Wood and Paper Science. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin; Filosofie Doctor, University of Uppsala, Sweden. 



284 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Frederick Russell Cox, Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Gertrude Mary Cox, Professor Emeritus of Statistics. M.S., Iowa State University. 

Joseph H. Cox, Professor of Design. M.F.A., University of Iowa. 

Walter Lee Cox, Assistant Professor of Education. Ed.D., North Carolina State University. 

Harris Bradford Craig, Professor of Food Science and Associate Director of Academic Af- 
fairs for the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences and Director of the Agricultural In- 
stitute. Ph.D., Michigan State University. 

Paul Day Cribbins, Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., Purdue University. 

James Ernest Crisp, Assistant Professor of History. Ph.D., Yale University. 

Ford A. Cross, Adjunct Associate Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., Oregon State University. 

Harold Lee Crutcher, Adjunct Associate Professor of Statistics. Ph.D., New York Univer- 
sity. 

John Anthony Cuculo, Professor of Textile Chemistry. Ph.D., Duke University. 

George August Cummings, Associate Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., Purdue University. 

Ralph Waldo Cummings, Professor Emeritus of Soil Science. Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Joseph William Cunningham, Professor of Psychology. Ph.D., Purdue University. 

Terrence Michael Curtin, Professor and Head of the Department of Veterinary Science. 
Ph.D., Purdue University. 

James Alvin Daggerhart Jr., Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 
Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Robert David Dahle, Extension Associate Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., 
North Carolina State University. 

John Michael Anthony Danby, Professor of Mathematics and Physics. Ph.D., Manchester 
University, England. 

Edmund Pendleton Dandridge Jr., Associate Professor of English. Ph.D., University of 
Virginia. 

Stylianos D. Danielopoulos, Assistant Professor of Computer Science. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Leon E. Danielson, Associate Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., University of 
California. 

Walter Carl Dauterman, Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Donald Gould Davenport, Professor of Animal Science. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Charles Bingham Davey, Professor of Soil Science, Forestry and Plant Pathology, and Head 
of the Department of Forestry. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Adam Clarke Davis, Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., Duke Uni- 
versity. 

David Edward Davis, Professor Emeritus of Zoology. Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Henry Mauzee Davis, Adjunct Professor of Materials Engineering. Ph.D., University of Min- 
nesota. 

Robert Foster Davis, Associate Professor of Materials Engineering. Ph.D., University of 
California at Berkeley. 

William Robert Davis, Professor of Physics. Doktor der Naturuiss, University of Hanover, 
Germany. 

Cleburn Gilchrist Dawson, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

Donald Lee Dean, Professor of Civil Engineering and Head of the Department. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Michigan. 

M. Keith DeArmond, Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., University of Arizona. 

Fred Roark DeJarnette, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Graduate 
Administrator. Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 

Donald Warren DeJong, Associate Professor (USDA) of Botany. Ph.D., University of 
Georgia. 

L. Richard Delia Fave, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts. 

Donald Ray Deuel, Associate Professor of Computer Science. Ph.D., University of California 
at Berkeley. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 285 

Hugh A. Devine, Assistant Professor of Recreation Resources Administration. Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania State University. 

James William Dickens, Professor (USDA) of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. M.S., 
North Carolina State University. 

David Alan Dickey, Assistant Professor of Statistics. Ph.D., Iowa State University. 

Emmett Urcey Dillard, Associate Professor of Animal Science and Genetics. Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Missouri. 

Richard Carl Dillman, Associate Professor of Veterinary Science. Ph.D., Kansas State Uni- 
versity. 

George Osmore Doak, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Walter Jerome Dobrogosz, Professor of Microbiology. Ph.D., Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity. 

Phillip David Doerr, Assistant Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Wesley Osborne Doggett, Professor of Physics. Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 

Carl John Dolce, Professor of Education and Dean of the School of Education. Ed.D., Har- 
vard University. 

Robert Alan Donaldson, Assistant Professor of Textiles and Design. A. Design, Scottish 
College of Textiles. 

William Emmert Donaldson, Professor of Poultry Science. Ph.D., University of Maryland. 

Jesse Seymour Doolittle, Professor Emeritus of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 
M.S., Pennsylvania State University. 

William Grady Dotson Jr., Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill. 

Robert A Men Douglas, Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., Purdue University. 

Murray Scott Downs, Assistant Provost and Professor of History. Ph.D., Duke University. 

Robert Jack Downs, Professor of Botany and Horticultural Science and Director of the 
Phytotron. Ph.D., George Washington University. 

Lawrence Williain Drabick, Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., Pennsylvania 
State University. 

Donald William Drewes, Professor of Psychology. Ph.D., Purdue University. 

Earl G. Droessler, Vice Provost and Dean for Research and Professor of Geosciences. B.A., 
Loras College. 

John Warren Duffield, Professor Emeritus of Forestry and Genetics. Ph.D., University of 
California at Berkeley. 

Harry Ernest Duncan, Professor of Plant Pathology and In Charge, Plant Pathology Exten- 
sion. Ph.D., West Virginia University. 

Joseph C Dunn, Associate Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., Adelphi University. 

Edward James Dunphy, Assistant Professor of Crop Science. Ph.D., Iowa State University. 

Jack Davis Dtirant, Professor of English and Director of the Graduate Programs. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Tennessee. 

Carl L. Dyer, Associate Professor of Textile Materials and Management. Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

Donald Workman Eaddy, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Yukiko Ebisuzaki, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., Indiana University. 

Allen C. Eberhardt, Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Ph.D., 
North Carolina State University. 

Eddie Echandi, Professor of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Arthur Raymond Eckels, Professor of Electrical Engineering. D.Engr., Yale University. 

Herbert Martin Eckerlin, Extension Specialist and Associate Professor of Mechanical and 
Aerospace Engineering. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Frank Wesley Edens, Assistant Professor of Poultry Science. Ph.D., University of Georgia. 

John Auert Edwards, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Ph.D., Purdue 
University. 

Louis Laird Edwards, Adjunct Professor of Wood and Paper Science. Ph.D., University of 
Idaho. 



286 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Eugene J. Eisen, Professor of Animal Science and Genetics. Ph.D., Purdue University. 

Magdi Mohamed El-Kammash, Associate Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., Duke 
University. 

Gerald Hugh Elkan, Professor of Microbiology and Assistant Dean for University Research. 
Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 

Thomas Smith EUeman, Professor of Nuclear Engineering and Head of the Department. 
Ph.D., Iowa State University. 

Robert Neal Elliott, Associate Professor of History. Ph.D., University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill. 

Don Edwin Ellis, Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Eric Louis Ellwood, Professor of Wood and Paper Science, Dean of the School of Forest 
Resources and Assistant Director of Research, School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. 
Ph.D., Yale University. 

Salah E. Elmaghraby, University Professor of Industrial Engineering and Director of Opera- 
tions Research. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Kent Dennis Elsey, Assistant Professor (USDA) of Entomology. Ph.D., North Carolina State 
University. 

Aly H. M. El-Shiekh, Professor of Textile Materials and Management. Sc.D., Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. 

John Frederick Ely, Professor of Civil Engineering and Associate Dean for Academic 
Affairs, School of Engineering. Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

Paul D. Emerson, Associate Professor of Textiles and Head, Textile Machine Design and 
Development. B.S., Purdue University. 

Donald Allen Emery, Professor of Crop Science and Genetics and Coordinator of Graduate 
Programs. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Elliot David Engel, Assistant Professor of English. Ph.D., University of California at Los 
Angeles. 

David Lee Erickson, Assistant Professor of Recreation Resources Administration. Ph.D., 
Ohio State University. 

Edward Walter Erickson, Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., Vanderbilt Univer- 
sity. 

Robert Edmund Eskridge, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Meteorology. Ph.D., Texas A&M 
University. 

John Lincoln Etchells, Professor Emeritus (USDA) of Food Science and Microbiology. Ph.D., 
Michigan State University. 

James Brainerd Evans, Professor of Microbiology and Head of the Department. Ph.D., Cor- 
nell University. 

Ralph Eigil Fadum, Professor of Civil Engineering and Dean of the School of Engineering. 
S.D., Harvard University. 

Abdel-Aziz Fahmy, Professor of Materials Engineering. Ph.D., University of Sheffield. 

Erika Schmid Fairchild, Assistant Professor of Political Science. Ph.D., University of Wash- 
ington. 

Maurice Hugh Farrier, Professor of Entomology and Forestry. Ph.D., North Carolina State 
University. 

Robert Morcom Fearn, Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Richard Mark Felder, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering and Graduate Ad- 
ministrator. Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Randolph Lyons Ferguson, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., Florida State 
University. 

James K. Ferrell, Alcoa Professor of Chemical Engineering and Head of the Department. 
Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

William Thomas Fike Jr., Professor of Crop Science. Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Alva Leroy Finkner, Adjunct Professor of Statistics. Ph.D., North Carolina State Univer- 
sity. 

Charles Page Fisher Jr., Adjunct Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 287 

Hilbert Adam Fisher, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Roger Carl Fites, Associate Professor of Botany. Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

James Walter Fitts, Professor Emeritus of Soil Science. Ph.D., Iowa State College. 

Stuart Milton Flashman, Assistant Professor of Genetics. Ph.D., Harvard University. 

David Joseph Flath, Assistant Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., University of 
California at Los Angeles. 

Henry Pridgen Fleming, Professor (USDA) of Food Science. Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Walter A. Flood, Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Romeo Marzo Flores, Adjunct Associate Professor of Geology. Ph.D., Louisiana State 
University. 

William Carl Fonteno III, Assistant Professor of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., Texas A&M 
University. 

Vincent M. Foote, Associate Professor of Product Design and Program Director. B.S., Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati. 

Robert Joseph Fornaro, Associate Professor of Computer Science. Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 
University. 

Raymond Earl Fornes, Associate Professor of Textile Materials and Management and 
Physics. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Benjamin Eagles Fountain, Adjunct Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

James R. Fonts, Adjunct Professor of Entomology and Toxicology. Ph.D., Northwestern Uni- 
versity. 

Barbara J. Fox, Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. Ph.D., University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

John Erwin Franke, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

William Glenwood Franklin, Professor of Speech-Communication and Head of the Depart- 
ment. Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 

Douglas J. Frederick, Assistant Professor of Forestry. Ph.D., University of Idaho. 

Leon David Freedman, Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

Ronald Owen Fulp, Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., Auburn University. 

A. Ronald Gallant, Associate Professor of Economics and Business and Statistics. Ph.D., 
Iowa State University. 

William Sylvan Galler, Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

Bertram Howard Garcia Jr., Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Ph.D., 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 

Donald Eugene Gardner, Adjunct Associate Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., University of 
Cincinnati. 

Marianne Lepp Gardner, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of Wis- 
consin. 

Rayidolph Gilbert Gardner, Assistant Professor of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., Cornell Uni- 
versity. 

Robin Pierce Gardner, Professor of Nuclear Engineering and Chemical Engineering. Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania State University. 

Jimmy Dale Garlich, Associate Professor of Poultry Science. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Dennis Evo Garoutte, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., Montana State Univer- 
sity. 

G. David Garson, Professor of Political Science and Head of the Department. Ph.D., Harvard 
University. 

James Wade Gault, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., University of Iowa. 

Ralph Gellar, Associate Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D.., Columbia University 

James Dalton George, Extension Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 
Ph.D., Florida State University. 

Thomas Waller George, Professor of Textile Materials and Management. M.A., University of 
Illinois. 

Thomas Michael Gerig, Associate Professor of Statistics. Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina. 



288 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Edwin R. Gerler, Assistant Professor of Guidance and Personnel Services. Ed.D., 
Pennsylvania State University. 

Dan Ulrich Gerstel, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Crop Science and Genetics. Ph.D., 
University of California at Berkeley. 

Forrest William Getzen, Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 

Francis Gerhard Giesbrecht, Professor of Statistics. Ph.D., Iowa State University. 

John H. Gilbert, Associate Professor of Political Science. Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Richard Dean Gilbert, Professor of Textile Chemistry. Ph.D., University of Notre Dame. 

William Best Gilbert, Professor of Crop Science. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Henry Cornelius Gilliam Jr., Associate Professor (USDA) of Economics and Business. Ph.D., 
Clemson University. 

James Wendell Gilliam, Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., Mississippi State University. 

Joseph Conrad Glass Jr., Associate Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 
Ed.D., North Carolina State University. 

Edward Walker Glazener, Professor of Poultry Science and Genetics and Associate Dean and 
Director of Academic Affairs, School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

Chester Eugene Gleit, Associate Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 

Tildon H. Glisson Jr., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., Southern 
Methodist University. 

Alfred John Goetze, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., Duke University. 

Harvey Joseph Gold, Professor of Statistics. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

George Goldfinger, Professor Emeritus of Textile Chemistry. Ph.D., University of Paris. 

Irving S. Goldstein, Professor of Wood and Paper Science and Head of the Department. 
Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Alan Gonzalez, Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures and Head of the Depart- 
ment. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

Gabriel Gonzalez, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Munich. 

Lemuel Goode, Professor of Animal Science. Ph.D., University of Florida. 

Guy Vernon Gooding Jr., Professor of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., University of California at 
Davis. 

Major M. Goodman, Professor of Statistics and Genetics and Botany. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Michael Jerome Goodman, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering. Ph.D., 
North Carolina State University. 

James Howard Goodnight, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Statistics. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Gordon Gordh, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., University of California. 

Christopher R. Gould, Associate Professor of Physics. Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Perry Linwood Grady, Associate Professor of Textile Materials and Management. Ph.D., 
North Carolina State University. 

William Lee Gragg, Associate Professor of Adult and Community College Education. Ph.D., 
Cornell University. 

Louis A. Graham, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Textile Chemistry. M.Ch.E., University 
of Virginia. 

John Joseph Grainger, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin. 

Victor Lawrence Granatstein, Adjunct Professor of Physics. Ph.D., Columbia University. 

Larry Frank Grand, Professor of Plant Pathology and Forestry. Ph.D., Washington State 
University. 

Arnold Herbert Edward Grandage, Professor of Statistics. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 
William Cullen Grant, Assistant Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., North Carolina State Univer- 
sity. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 28S 

Josef Stefan Gratzl, Professor of Wood and Paper Science. Ph.D., University of Vienna. 

Pamela D. Green, Assistant Professor of Psychology. Ph.D., Washington State University. 

Ralph Weller Greenlaiv, Professor of History. Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Walton Carlyle Gregory, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Crop Science and Genetics. 
Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Thomas J. Grennes, Assistant Professor of Economics and Business. M.A., University of 
Chicago. 

Wayland Coleman Griffith, R. J. Reynolds Industries Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace 
Engineering and Director, Engineering Design Center. Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Neil S. Grigg, Professor of Civil Engineering and Director of the Water Resources Research 
Institute. Ph.D., Colorado State University. 

James M. Grimwood, Assistant Professor of English. Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Daniel Swartwood Grosch, Professor of Genetics, Zoology and Entomology. Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania. 

Harry Douglass Gross, Professor of Crop Science. Ph.D., Iowa State University. 

William A. Gruver, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Operations Research. 
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Thomas Hyman Guion, Associate Professor of Textile Chemistry. Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina. 

Gary Frederick Gumz, Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture. M.L.A., Harvard 
University. 

Bhupender Singh Gupta, Associate Professor of Textile Materials and Management. Ph.D., 
Manchester College of Science and Technology. 

Edward Dewitt Gurley, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., University of 
Illinois. 

Frank Edwin Guthrie, Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

George Richard Gwynne, Associate Professor (USDA) of Crop Science and Genetics. Ph.D., 
Iowa State University. 

David G. Haase, Assistant Professor of Physics. Ph.D., Duke University. 

Robert John Hader, Professor of Statistics. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

William Leroy Hafley, Professor of Forestry and Statistics. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Fred Paid Hain, Assistant Professor of Entomology and Forestry. Ph.D., Michigan State 
University. 

Jay D. Hair, Associate Professor of Zoology and Forestry. Ph.D., University of Alberta. 

Francis Joseph Hale, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Sc.D., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

George Lincoln Hall, Professor of Physics. Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Max Halperen, Professor of English. Ph.D., Florida State University. 

Donald Dale Ham arm. Professor of Food Science and Biological and Agricultural Engineer- 
ing. Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 

Dame Scott Hamby, Burlington Industries Professor of Textiles, Acting Head of the Depart- 
ment of Textiles Materials and Management, and Associate Dean of Textiles Extension 
and Continuing Education. B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 

Pat Brooks Hamilton, Professor of Poultry Science and Microbiology. Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin. 

Vance Eugene Hamilton, Extension Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthrope 
Ed.D., North Carolina State University. 

John Valentine Hamme, Associate Professor of Materials Engineering and Director of 
Cooperative Engineering Education. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Gordon A. Hammon, Associate Professor Emeritus of Recreation Resources Administration 
B.S., New York State College of Forestry. 

Kenneth William Hanck, Associate Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Blanche C. Haning, Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., Iowa State University 

Arthur Paul Hansen, Associate Professor of Food Science. Ph.D., Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity. 



290 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Donald Joseph Hansen, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of Texas. 

Durwin Melford Hanson, Professor of Industrial and Technical Education and Coordinator 
of the Occupational Education and Industrial and Technical Education Programs. Ph.D., 
Iowa State University. 

James William Hanson, Assistant Professor of Computer Science. M.A., University of 
Michigan. 

Warren Durward Hanson, Professor of Genetics. Ph.D., Purdue University. 

John J. Harder, Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering. Dr.Ing., Technische 
Hochschule. 

James Walker Hardin, Professor of Botany and Acting Head of the Department. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Michigan. 

Harry Allen Hargrove, Associate Professor of English. Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 

Reinard Harkema, Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., Duke University. 

Charles Wayne Harper Jr., Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction and History. 
Ed.D., University of Northern Colorado. 

Cleon Wallace Harrell Jr., Associate Professor of Economics and Business. M.A., University 
of Virginia. 

George Oliver Harrell, Associate Professor of Materials Engineering. Ph.D., Ohio State Uni- 
versity. 

Charles Dare Harrington, Associate Professor of Geosciences. Ph.D., Indiana University. 

Walter Joel Harrington, Professor of Mathematics and Assistant Head of the Department. 
Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Harwell Hamilton Harris, Professor Emeritus of Architecture. 

James Ray Harris, Extension Professor of Poultry Science and Veterinary Science. D.V.M., 
Auburn University. 

William Charles Harris, Professor of History. Ph.D., University of Alabama. 

Antony Howard Harrison, Assistant Professor of English. Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

James William Harrison Jr., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., 
North Carolina State University. 

Clarence Arthur Hart, Professor of Wood and Paper Science. Ph.D., North Carolina State 
University. 

Franklin Delano Hart, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

Lodwick Charles Hartley, Professor Emeritus of English. Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Robert Eduard Hartwig, Associate Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of Adelaide. 

Paul Henry Harvey, William Neal Reynolds Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. Ph.D., Iowa 
State University. 

Raymond W. Harvey, Professor of Animal Science. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Awatif El-Domiaty Hassan, Associate Professor of Forestry and Wood and Paper Science 
and Biological and Agricultural Engineering. Ph.D., University of California at Davis. 

Hassan Ahmed Hassan, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Illinois. 

Francis Jefferson Hassler, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Biological and Agricultural 
Engineering and Head of the Department. Ph.D., Michigan State College. 

William Walton Hassler, Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 

John Reid Hawser, Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., Duke University. 

Thomas R. Hawser, Adjunct Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Cincinnati. 

Kerry Shuford Havner, Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., Oklahoma State University. 

Leo Franklin Hawkins, Extension Assistant Professor of Adult and Community College 
Education, and Extension Specialist in Charge of Human Development. Ed.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

Don William Hayne, Professor of Statistics and Zoology. Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

Frank Lloyd Haynes Jr., Professor of Horticultural Science and Genetics. Ph.D., Cornell 
University. 

Allen Streeter Heagle, Associate Professor (USDA) of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., University of 
Minnesota. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 291 

Teddy Theodore Hebert, Professor of Plant Pathology and Genetics. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Walter Webb Heck, Professor (USDA) of Botany. Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Clinton Louis Heimbach, Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

James E. Helt, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D., Iowa State University. 

Warren Robert Henderson, Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., Ohio State 
University. 

Forrest Clyde Hentz Jr., Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

George Henry Hepting. Adjunct Professor of Plant Pathology and Forestry. Ph.D., Cornell 
University. 

Solomon Philip Hersh, Charles A. Cannon Professor of Textiles and Chairman of the Com- 
mittee for the Fiber and Polymer Science Program. Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Marvin Thomas Hester, Associate Professor of English. Ph.D., University of Florida. 

Randolph Thompson Hester Jr., Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture. M.L.A., 
Harvard University. 

Virginia Aldige Hiday, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Charles Horace Hill, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Poultry Science and Animal 
Science. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Thomas Ira Hines, Professor of Recreation Resources Administration and Head of the 
Department. M.A., University of North Carolina. 

Robert Grant Hitchings, Professor of Wood and Paper Science, and In Charge of Pulp and 
Paper Technology. M.F., Duke University. 

George Burnham Hoadley, Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering. D.Sc, 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

John Eyres Hobbie, Adjunct Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., Indiana University. 

Joseph Patrick Hobbs, Professor of History. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

Ernest Hodgson, William Neal Reynolds Professor cf Entomology. Ph.D., Oregon State Uni- 
versity. 

Thomas Henry Hodgson, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of London. 

Virgil Fortune Holland, Adjunct Associate Professor of Textile Materials and Management. 
Ph.D., University of Southern California. 

Daniel Lester Holley Jr., Associate Professor of Forestry and Economics and Business. 
Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Linda Tarte Holley, Assistant Professor of English. Ph.D., Tulane University. 

Duncan McClave Holthausen Jr., Associate Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., 
Northwestern University. 

Abraham Holtzman, Professor of Political Science. Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Thomas Lynn Honeycutt, Associate Professor of Computer Science and Associate Head of 
the Department. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Dale Max Hoover, Professor of Economics and Business and Assistant Head of the Depart- 
ment. Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Maurice William Hoover, Professor of Food Science. Ph.D., University of Florida. 

Harold Bruce Hopfenberg, Professor of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D., Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology. 

William Ernest Hopke, Professor of Guidance and Personnel Services and Head of the 
Department. Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

Yasuyuki Horie, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., Washington State Univer- 
sity. 

Horace Robert Horton, Professor of Biochemistry. Ph.D., University of Missouri. 

Donald Earl Hoss, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

David Hewes Howells, Professor Emeritus of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. M.S., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Barney Kuo-Yen Huang, Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. Ph.D., Purdue 
University. 



292 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Jeng-Sheng Huang, Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., University of Missouri. 

Norden Eh Huang, Adjunct Associate Professor of Oceanography. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University. 

Z Zimmerman Hugus Jr., Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., University of California at 
Berkeley. 

Melvin Theodore Huish, Associate Professor (USDI) of Zoology. Ph.D., University of 
Georgia. 

Donald Huisingh, Professor of University Studies. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Johnny Leroy Hulsey, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., University of 
Missouri. 

Frank James Humenik, Associate Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering and 
Associate Head of the Department In Charge of Extension. Ph.D., Ohio State Univer- 
sity. 

Ervin Grigg Humphries, Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering and 
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

James Ernest Huneycutt Jr., Associate Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Gene Raymond Huntsman, Adjunct Associate Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., Iowa State Uni- 
versity. 

John Calvin Hurt, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Materials Engineering. Ph.D., Rutgers 
University. 

Jacob Allan Hurwitz, Assistant Professor of Political Science. Ph.D., Michigan State Uni- 
versity. 

George Hyatt Jr., Professor of Animal Science, Associate Dean of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences and Director of Agricultural Extension Service. Ph.D., University of Wiscon- 
sin. 

David Neil Hyman, Associate Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., Princeton Uni- 
versity. 

Theodore Martin Hyman, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. 

Loren Albert Ihnen, Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., Iowa State University. 

Daniel Wesley Israel, Assistant Professor (USDA) of Soil Science. Ph.D., Oregon State Uni- 
versity. 

William Addison Jackson, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

AtulJai, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., North Carolina State 
Univerwity. 

Gerald Saul Janouritz, Associate Professor of Oceanography. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity. 

Lance Flippin Jeffers, Associate Professor of English. M.A., Columbia University. 

Alvin Wilkins Jenkins Jr., Professor of Physics. Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Samuel Forest Jenkins Jr., Professor of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Bryan Hugh Johnson, Associate Professor of Animal Science. Ph.D., Oklahoma State Uni- 
versity. 

Charles Edward Johnson, Associate Professor of Physics. Ph.D., Yale University. 

Joseph Clyde Johnson, Professor of Psychology. Ed.D., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

John William Johnson, Professor of Forestry. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Paul Reynolds Johnson, Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Thomas Johnson, Associate Professor of Economics and Business and Statistics. Ph.D., 
North Carolina State University. 

William Hugh Johnson, Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

William L. Johnson, Associate Professor of Animal Science. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

David West Johnston, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., North Carolina State 
University. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 298 

Robert Ed ward Johnston, Assistant Professor of Microbiology. Ph.D., University of Te 
Charles Parker Jones, Associate Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., University of 

North Carolina. 
Edgar Walton Jones, Professor of Economics and Business and Associate Vice President for 

Research and Public Service Programs of the University of North Carolina. Ph.D., North 

Carolina State University. 
Evan Earl Jones, Professor of Animal Science and Biochemistry. PhD., University of Illinois. 
Guy Langston Jones, Extension Professor of Crop Science and Soil Science and In Charge of 

Crop Science Extension. Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Ivan Dunlavy Jones, Professor Emeritus of Food Science. Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
James Robert Jones, Professor of Animal Science. Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Lawrence Keith Jones, Associate Professor of Guidance and Personnel Services and Acting 

Head of the Department. Ph.D., University of Missouri. 
Louis AUman Jones, Associate Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., Texas A&M University. 
Ronald Klair Jones, Extension Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., Virginia 

Polytechnic Institute. 
Victor Alan Jones, Professor of Food Science and Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
Charles Edward Joyner, Assistant Professor of Design. M.F.A., University of North Carolina 

at Greensboro. 
Joseph Stephan Kahn, Professor of Botany and Biochemistry. Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
James W. Kalat, Assistant Professor of Psychology. Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
Henry Leveke Kamphoefner, Professor Emeritus of Architecture and Dean Emeritus of the 

School of Design. M.S., Columbia University. 
Eugene John Kamprath, Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Shun Kanda, Assistant Professor of Architecture. M.Arch., Harvard University. 
Robert E. Kanich, Adjunct Associate Professor of Microbiology. M.D., Medical College of 

Virginia. 
A bdel-Aziz Ismail Kashef, Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Gerald Howard Katzin, Professor of Physics. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
James F. Kauffman, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Assistant Head of 

the Department. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Harvey G. Kebschull, Associate Professor of Political Science and Assistant Head of the 

Department. 
Jack William Keely, Assistant Professor of Design. M.F.A., Cranbrook Academy of Art. 
Kenneth Raymond Keller, Professor of Crop Science, Director of Research and Associate 

Dean for the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Robert Clay Kellison, Associate Professor of Forestry and Assistant Director of Industry, 

Tree Improvement Crop. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Harry Charles Kelly, Professor Emeritus of Physics. Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology. 
John Rivard Kelly, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Southern California at Los Angeles. 
Myron William Kelly, Assistant Professor of Wood and Paper Science. Ph.D., North Carolina 

State University. 
George Grady Kennedy, Assistant Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Jerome Howard Kerby, Assistant Professor (USDI) of Zoology. Ph.D., University of 

Virginia. 
Christopher Robin Kieffer, Assistant Professor of Design. M.F.A., Temple University. 
James A. Kilby, Assistant Professor of English. Ph.D., University of Iowa. 
Jin J. Kim, Assistant Professor of Physics. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
E. Lamar Kimbrough, Extension Associate Professor of Crop Science. Ph.D., Virginia 

Polytechnic Institute. 
Henderson Grady Kincheloe, Professor Emeritus of English. Ph.D., Duke University. 
Dannie H. King, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Microbiology. Ph.D.. North Carolina Si 

University. 



294 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Doris Elizabeth King, Professor of History. Ph.D., Duke University. 

Larry Dean King, Assistant Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., University of Georgia. 

Richard Adams King, M. G. Mann Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., Harvard 
University. 

Herbert Julien Kirk, Assistant Professor of Statistics and Horticultural Science. Ph.D., 
North Carolina State University. 

Thomas Kent Kirk, Adjunct Associate Professor of Wood and Paper Science. Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

William P. Kirk II, Adjunct Associate Professor of Physics. Ph.D., University of Rochester. 

James Bryant Kirkland, Professor Emeritus of Education and Dean Emeritus of the School 
of Education. Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Katherine W. Klein, Assistant Professor of Psychology. Ph.D., Wayne State University. 

Harold Joseph Kleiss, Extension Assistant Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., University of 
Illinois. 

Marjorie Anne Klenin, Assistant Professor of Physics. Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Wesley Edunn K loos, Professor of Genetics and Microbiology. Ph.D., Iowa State University. 

James J. F. Knapton, Associate Professor of Textile Materials and Management. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Leeds. 

Kenneth Lee Knight, Professor of Entomology and Head of the Department. Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Illinois. 

Richard Bennett Knight, L. L. Vaughan Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 
M.S., University of Illinois. 

Charles Robert Knoeber, Assistant Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., University 
of California at Los Angeles. 

James Arthur Knopp, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Albert Sidney Knowles, Professor of English. M.A., University of Virginia. 

Charles Ernest Knowles, Associate Professor of Geosciences. Ph.D., Texas A&M University. 

Malcolm S. Knowles, Professor of Adult and Community College Education. Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Chicago. 

Peter Koch, Adjunct Professor of Wood and Paper Science. Ph.D., University of Washington. 

KwangilKoh, Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

John Ronald Kolb, Professor of Mathematics and Mathematics and Science Education. 
Ph.D., University of Maryland. 

Thomas Rinehart Konsler, Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

Benjamin Granade Koonce Jr., Professor of English. Ph.D., Princeton University. 

William J. Koros, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D., University of Texas. 

Eugene G. KrenzerJr., Assistant Professor of Crop Science. Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

William Wurth Kriegel, Professor Emeritus of Materials Engineering. Dr. Ing., Technische 
Hochschule. 

Knut Paul Kringstad, Adjunct Professor of Wood and Paper Science. Dr. rer. nat., Technical 
University. 

George James Kriz, Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering and Assistant 
Director of Research for the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Ph.D., University 
of California at Davis. 

Charles L. Kronberg, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology. Ph.D., Duke University. 

Kenneth K. Krueger, Assistant Professor of Poultry Science. Ph.D., Texas A&M University. 

Elmer George Kuhlman, Adjunct Professor of Plant Pathology and Forestry. Ph.D., Oregon 
State University. 

Thomas J. Lada, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of Notre Dame. 

FredLadoJr, Associate Professor of Physics. Ph.D., University of Florida. 

John Ralph Lambert Jr., Professor of University Studies. Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Joe Oscar Lammi, Professor of Forestry. Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 

Forrest Wesley Lancaster, Professor Emeritus of Physics. Ph.D., Duke University. 

Chester Grey Landes, Associate Professor Emeritus of Wood and Paper Science. B.S.Ch.E., 
Ohio State University. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 295 

Leonard Jay Langfelder, Professor of Civil Engineering and Director of Center for Marine 
and Coastal Studies. Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Tyre Calvin Lanier, Assistant Professor of Food Science. Ph.D., University of Georgia. 

John Sumner Lapp, Assistant Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., Princeton Uni- 
versity. 

Neil Arden Lapp, Adjunct Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Roy Axel Larson, Professor of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Doris Lucas Laryea, Associate Professor of English. Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Charles A. Lassiter, Professor of Animal Science and Head of the Department. Ph.D., 
Michigan State University. 

Dana May Latch, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., City University of New York. 

Robert L. Launer, Adjunct Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering. Ph.D., Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute and State University. 

Cathy Laurie- Ahlberg, Assistant Professor of Genetics. Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Anthony J. LaVopa, Assistant Professor of History. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Robert M. Leary, Visiting Lecturer (part-time) in Design. M. of Regional Planning, Cornell 
University. 

James Murray Leatherwood, Professor of Animal Science and Coordinator of the Nutrition 
Program. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

James Giacomo Lecce, Professor of Animal Science and Microbiology. Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania. 

Joshua Alexander Lee, Professor (USDA) of Crop Science and Genetics. Ph.D., University of 
California at Davis. 

Sun H. Lee, Visiting Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Operations Research. 
Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles. 

James Edward Legates, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Animal Science and Genetics 
and Dean of the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Ph.D., Iowa State University. 

Carlton James Leith, Professor of Geosciences and Head of the Department. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of California at Berkeley. 

Vern Blair Lentz, Assistant Professor of English. Ph.D., University of Iowa. 

Kurt John Leonard, Associate Professor (USDA) of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., Cornell Uni- 
versity. 

Rebecca Leonard, Assistant Professor of Speech-Communication. Ph.D., Purdue Uni- 
versity. 

Thomas Earl LeVere, Professor of Psychology. Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Michael Phillip Levi, Professor of Wood and Paper Science and Plant Pathology and Exten- 
sion Wood Products Specialist. Ph.D., Leeds University. 

JackLevine, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Samuel Gale Levine, Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Charles Sanford Levings III, Professor of Genetics. Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Charles Edward Lewis, Extension Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 
Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Paul Edwin Lewis, Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

William Mason Lewis, Professor of Crop Science. Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Hugh L. Liner, Extension Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., North Carolina State 
University. 

Ardell Chester Linnerud, Associate Professor of Statistics. Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Michael Anthony Littlejohn, Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Charles Dwayne Livengood, Associate Professor of Textile Chemistry. Ed.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Robert Warren Llewellyn, Professor of Industrial Engineering. M.S. I.E., Purdue Uni- 
versity. 

Don Cary Locke, Assistant Professor of Guidance and Personnel Services. Ed.D., Ball State 
University. 



296 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Martin P. Loeb, Assistant Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., Northwestern Uni- 
versity. 

Richard Henry Loeppert, Professor of Chemistry and Assistant to the Department Head. 
Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

David Timothy Long, Assistant Professor of Geology. Ph.D., University of Kansas. 

George Gilbert Long, Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., University of Florida. 

Raymond Carl Long, Associate Professor of Crop Science. Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Ian Stewart Longmuir, Professor of Biochemistry. M.B.B., St. Bartholomew's Medical 
School. 

Peter Reeves Lord, Abel C. Lineberger Professor of Textiles and Graduate Administrator 
for Textile Materials and Management. Ph.D., University of London. 

John Loss, Professor of Design and Director of the Architecture Program. M.Arch., Uni- 
versity of Michigan. 

Joseph William Love, Extension Professor of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., Ohio State Uni- 
versity. 

Richard Lawrence Lower, Professor of Horticultural Science and Graduate Coordinator. 
Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

George Blanchard Lucas, Professor of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

Leon Thomas Lucas, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., University of California 
at Davis. 

Geraldine H. Luginbuhl, Assistant Professor of Microbiology. Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

James Emory Robinson Luginbuhl, Associate Professor of Psychology. Ph.D., University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Jiang Luh, Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

James Fulton Lutz, Professor Emeritus of Soil Science. Ph.D., University of Missouri. 

Joseph Thomas Lynn, Professor Emeritus of Physics. M.S., Ohio State University. 

Charles F. Lytle, Professor of Zoology and Teaching Coordinator in the Biological Sciences. 
Ph.D., Indiana University. 

Jerry Lee Machemehl, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., Texas A&M Uni- 
versity. 

Lucinda Hardwick MacKethan, Assistant Professor of English. Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Alexander William Macklin, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. 

Clarence Joseph Maday, Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 
Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

John William Magill, Associate Professor Emeritus of Psychology. Ph.D., Professor of 
Materials Engineering. Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 

James Kitchener Magor, Professor of Materials Engineering. Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 
University. 

Cathy C Mahmoud, Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. Ed.D., University of 
Tennessee. 

Alexander Russell Main, Professor of Biochemistry. Ph.D., Cambridge University. 

Charles Edward Main, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., University of Wiscon- 
sin. 

Charles Michael Mainland, Professor of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., Rutgers University. 

T. Ewald Maki, Carl Alwin Schenck Professor Emeritus of Forestry. Ph.D., University of 
Minnesota. 

Herbert Rooney Malcom, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Heinrich Valdemar Mailing, Adjunct Professor of Genetics. Ph.D., University of 
Copenhagen. 

Fred Allen Mangum Jr., Associate Professor of Economics. Ph.D., Michigan State Uni- 
versity. 

Thurston Jefferson Mann, Professor of Crop Science and Genetics, and Assistant Director in 
Charge of Tobacco Research in the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. Ph.D., Cor- 
nell University. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 297 

Charles Richard Manning Jr., Professor of Materials Engineering. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Edward George Manning, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. M.S., North 
Carolina State University. 

Edward Raymond Manring, Professor of Physics. Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Allison Ray Manson, Associate Professor of Statistics. Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 

Herman F. Mark, Adjunct Professor of Textile Chemistry. Ph.D., University of Vienna. 

Joe Alton Marlin, Associate Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Culpepper Paul Marsh, Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. M.S., North Carolina State 
University. 

Terence Edward Marshall, Assistant Professor of Political Science. Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania. 

David Boyd Marsland, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D., Cornell Uni- 
versity. 

Clifford K. Martin, Assistant Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

David Hamilton Martin, Associate Professor of Physics. M.S., University of Wisconsin. 

Donald Crowell Martin, Professor and Head of the Department of Computer Science and 
Professor of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

LeRoy Brown Martin Jr., Professor of Computer Science and Assistant Provost for Uni- 
versity Computing. Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Robert H Martin Jr., Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology. 

Bernard Stephen Martof Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

David Dickenson Mason, Professor of Statistics and Head of the Department. Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

Joseph Paul Mastro, Associate Professor of Political Science. Ph.D., Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity. 

Gene Arthur Mathia, Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., North Carolina State 
University. 

Neely Forsyth Jones Matthews, Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., Princeton Uni- 
versity. 

Dale Frederick Matzinger, Professor of Genetics. Ph.D., Iowa State College. 

Vernon Charles Matzen, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., University of 
California at Berkeley. 

George Mayer, Adjunct Professor of Materials Engineering. Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology. 

Selz Cabot Mayo, Professor of Sociology and Anthropology and Head of the Department. 
Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

David F. McAllister, Associate Professor of Computer Science. Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Warren Lee McCabe, R. J. Reynolds Industries Professor Emeritus of Chemical Engineering. 
Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

Glenn Crocker McCann, Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., Washington State 
University. 

Charles Bernard McCants, Professor of Soil Science and Head of the Department. Ph.D., 
Iowa State College. 

Jackson Mearns McClain, Associate Professor of Political Science. Ph.D., University of 
Alabama. 

William Fred McClure, Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

Robert Edmund McCollum, Associate Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Ernest Eugene McConnell, Adjunct Associate Professor of Veterinary Science. D.V.M., Ohio 
State University. 

Kathleen Anderton McCutchen, Assistant Professor Emeritus in the School of Education. 
M.A., Columbia University. 

Benjamin Thomas McDaniel, Professor of Animal Science and Genetics. Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University. 



298 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Patrick Hill McDonald Jr., Harrelson Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

Michael B. McElroy, Assistant Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

Paul T. McFarlane, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University. 

Ralph McGregor, Professor of Textile Chemistry and Graduate Administrator. Ph.D., Leeds 
University. 

William Thomas McKean Jr., Adjunct Professor of Wood and Paper Science. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Washington. 

Wendell Herbert McKenzie, Associate Professor of Genetics. Ph.D., North Carolina State 
University. 

Claude Eugene McKinney, Professor of Design and Dean of the School. B.A., University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Philip Keith McKnelly, Assistant Professor of Recreation Resources Administration. Ph.D., 
Texas A & M University. 

John Joseph McNeill, Associate Professor of Animal Science and Microbiology. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

Francis Edward McVay, Professor of Statistics. Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Julie Gegner McVay, Assistant Professor of Guidance and Personnel Services. Ed.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

Jefferson Sullivan Meares, Professor Emeritus of Physics. M.S., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Thoyd Melton, Assistant Professor of Microbiology. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

Jasper Durham Memory, Professor of Physics and Associate Dean, School of Physical and 
Mathematical Sciences. Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Arthur Clayton Menius Jr., Professor of Physics and Dean of the School of Physical and 
Mathematical Sciences. Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Charles Venable Mercer, Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Donald Hartland Mershon, Associate Professor of Psychology. Ph.D., University of Califor- 
nia at Santa Barbara. 

Carl J. Messere, Associate Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., University of South 
Carolina. 

Lawrence Eugene Mettler, Professor Emeritus of Genetics and Zoology. Ph.D., University of 
Texas. 

Louis John Metz, Adjunct Professor of Forestry and Soil Science. Ph.D., Duke University. 

Carl Dean Meyer, Associate Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., Colorado State University. 

John Richard Meyer, Assistant Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Walter Earl Meyers, Associate Professor of English. Ph.D., University of Florida. 

Gordon Kennedy Middleton, Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Jerome Phillip Miksche, Professor of Botany and Head of the Department. Ph.D., Iowa State 
University. 

Marion Lawrence Miles, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Director of Organic 
Laboratories. Ph.D., University of Florida. 

Robert Donald Milholland, Professor of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Conrad Henry Miller, Professor of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., Michigan State University. 

Grover Cleveland Miller, Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 

Howard George Miller, Professor of Psychology. Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 

John Maurice Miller, Assistant Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin at 
Madison. 

Lathan Lee Miller, Associate Professor Emeritus of Recreation Resources Administration. 
M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Texton Robert Miller, Associate Professor of Agricultural Education. Ph.D., Ohio State Uni- 
versity. 
William Dykstra Miller, Professor Emeritus of Forestry. Ph.D., Yale University. 
William Laubaeh Miller, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. Ph.D., Cornell University. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 299 

Gordon S. Miner, Assistant Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 
Jehangir Farhad Mirza, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., North Carolina 

State University. 
Walter Joseph MistricJr., Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., Texas A&M University. 
Adolphus Mitchell Professor Emeritus of Engineering Science and Mechanics. M.S.C.E., 

University of North Carolina. 
Gary Earl Mitchell, Professor of Physics. Ph.D., Florida State University. 
Theodore Bertis Mitchell, Professor Emeritus of Entomology. D.S., Harvard University. 
Thornton W. Mitchell, Adjunct Associate Professor of History. Ph.D., Columbia University. 
Khosrow Louis Moazed, Professor of Materials Engineering. Ph.D., Carnegie Institute of 

Technology. 
Richard Dotiglas Mochrie, Professor of Animal Science. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 
Gary Norman Mock, Assistant Professor of Textile Chemistry. Ph.D., Clemson University. 
Mansour H. M. Mohamed, Professor of Textile Materials and Management. Ph.D., 

Manchester College of Science and Technology. 
Subhas Chandra Mohapatra, Research Associate in the Department of Biological and 

Agricultural Engineering. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Robert Harry Moll, Professor of Genetics and Horticultural Science. Ph.D., North Carolina 

State University. 
Thomas Joseph Monaco, Professor of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., North Carolina State 

University. 
Daniel James Moncol, Professor of Veterinary Science and Animal Science. D.V.M., Uni- 
versity of Georgia. 
Robert James Monroe, Professor of Statistics. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Larry King Monteith, Professor and Head of the Department of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Catherine Elizabeth Moore, Associate Professor ot English. Ph.D., University of North 

Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Clifford James Moore Jr., Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Ph.D., Southern Methodist University. 
Frank Harper Moore, Professor of English. Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Harry Ballard Moore Jr., Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Robert Parker Moore, Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Charles Galloway Morehead, Professor Emeritus of Guidance and Personnel Services. Ed.D., 

University of Kansas. 
Charles Glen Moreland, Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., University of Florida. 
Donald Edwin Moreland, Professor (USDA) of Crop Science, Botany and Forestry. Ph.D., 

North Carolina State University. 
George Wallace Morgan Jr., Assistant Professor of Poultry Science. Ph.D., Mississippi State 

University. 
Marvin Kent Moss, Professor of Physics. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Mark A. Mostow, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., Harvard University. 
Ralph Lionel Mott, Associate Professor of Botany and Horticultural Science. Ph.D., Cornell 

University. 
J. Richard Mowat, Assistant Professor of Physics. Ph.D., University of California at 

Berkeley. 
Robert Lonnie Moxley, Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., Cornell 

University. 
James William Moyer, Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. Ph.D.. Pennsylvania State 

University. 
Samuel C. Mozley, Associate Professor of Zoology. Ph.D. Emory University. 
James Andrew Mulholland, Assistant Professor of History. Ph.D., University of Delaware 
Wesley Grigg Mullen, Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., Purdue University. 
James Colvin Mulligan, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Ph.D., Tulane 

University. 



300 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Charles Franklin Murphy, Associate Professor of Crop Science and Genetics. Ph.D., Iowa 
State University. 

James J. Murray, Adjunct Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. S.M., Uni- 
versity of Chicago. 

Raymond LeRoy Murray, Burlington Professor of Physics and Nuclear Engineering. Ph.D., 
University of Tennessee. 

Kenneth Earl Muse, Associate Professor of Zoology and Veterinary Science. Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

Robert David Mustian, Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology and Graduate 
Administrator. Ph.D., Florida State University. 

Richard Monier Myers, Professor of Animal Science and Teaching Coordinator. M.S., 
Pennsylvania State University. 

George C. Naderman Jr., Extension Assistant Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., Cornell Uni- 
versity. 

Howard Movess Nahikian, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Gene Namkoong, Adjunct Professor of Genetics and Forestry. Ph.D., North Carolina State 
University. 

James Nelson Jr., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of Alabama. 

Lawrence Alan Nelson, Professor of Statistics. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Paul Victor Nelson, Professor of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Joseph Toft Nerden, Professor Emeritus of Industrial and Technical Education. Ph.D., Yale 
University. 

William Belton Nesbitt, Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., Rutgers Uni- 
versity. 

Herbert Henry Neunzig, Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Gordon Darnell Newby, Associate Professor of History. Ph.D., Brandeis University. 

Slater Edmund Newman, Professor of Psychology. Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

John J. Nicholaides III, Assistant Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., Universtiy of Florida. 

Thomas Everett Nichols Jr., Extension Professor of Economics. Ph.D., Duke University. 

Paul Adrian Nickel, Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of California at Los 
Angeles. 

Gifford Spruce Nickerson, Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Lowell Wendell Nielsen, Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Glenn Ray Noggle, Professor of Botany. Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Bruce Augustus Norton, Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychology. Ph.D., Ohio State Uni- 
versity. 

Stephens Watson Nunnally, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., Northwestern 
University. 

Charles Joseph Nusbaum, William Neal Reynolds Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology. 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Henry Lee Williamson Nuttle, Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering. Ph.D., Johns 
Hopkins University. 

Gail W. O'Brien, Assistant Professor of Historv. Ph.D., University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill. 

Jonathan K. Ocko, Assistant Professor of History. Ph.D., Yale University. 

Bernard Martin Olsen, Professor of Economics and Business and Assistant Department 
Head. Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Delmar Walter Olson, Professor Emeritus of Industrial and Technical Education. Ph.D., 
Ohio State University. 

John Benjamin O'Neal Jr., Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., University of Florida. 

Ronald W. Oppenheim, Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychology. Ph.D., Washington Uni- 
versity. 

James M. Ortega, Professor of Mathematics and Head of the Department. Ph.D., Stanford 
University. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 301 

Michael Ray Overcash, Associate Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering and 
Chemical Engineering. Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Guy Owen Jr., Professor of English. Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Mehmet Necati Ozisik, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of London. 

Lavon Barry Page, Associate Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Hayne Palmour III, Professor of Materials Engineering. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Chia-Ven Pao, Associate Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 

Hubert Vern Park, Professor of Mathematics and Associate Department Head. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. 

Jae Young Park, Professor of Physics. Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

Charles Alexander Parker, Professor of Speech-Communications. Ph.D., Louisiana State 
University. 

George William Parker III, Associate Professor of Physics. Ph.D., University of South Caro- 
lina. 

John Mason Parker HI, Professor Emeritus of Geosciences. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Robert Kelley Parker, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Physics. Ph.D., University of New 
Mexico. 

Willis Melvin Parker, Assistant Professor of Occupational Education Ed.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Carmen R. Parkhurst, Associate Professor of Poultry Science. Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Barbara Mitchell Parramore, Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction and Head 
of the Department. Ed.D., Duke University. 

Mary Paschal, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. Ph.D., University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Ernest Caleb Pasour Jr., Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., Michigan State Uni- 
versity. 

Harold Edward Pattee, Professor (USDA) of Botany. Ph.D., Purdue University. 

Robert Preston Patterson, Associate Professor of Crop Science. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Richard Roland Patty, Professor of Physics and Acting Head of the Department. Ph.D., Ohio 
State University. 

Sandra Orley Paur, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., Indiana University. 

Michael Paxise, Assistant Professor in the School of Design and Director of the Basic Design 
Program. Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Richard Gustave Pearson, Professor of Psychology and Industrial Engineering. Ph.D., Car- 
negie Institute of Technology. 

Ronald Gray Pearson, Professor of Wood and Paper Science. Ph.D., University of Melbourne. 

John Gregory Peck, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Gerald Franklin Peedin, Assistant Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., North Carolina State 
University. 

Ralph James Peeler, Professor of Economics and Business and Associate Dean of the 
Graduate School. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

John Noble Perkins, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Ph.D., Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute. 

Richard Kidd Perrin, Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., Iowa State University. 

Jerome John Perry, Professor of Microbiology. Ph.D., University of Texas. 

Thomas Oliver Perry, Professor of Forestry, Genetics and Landscape Architecture. Ph.D., 
Harvard University. 

David S. Peters, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Keith Stuart Petersen, Associate Professor of Political Science. Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Walter John Peterson, William Neal Reynolds Professor Emeritus of Chemistry and Dean 
Emeritus of the Graduate School. Ph.D., University of Iowa. 

Wilbur Carroll Peterson, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., 
Northwestern University. 



302 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

David Mason Pharr, Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., University of 
Illinois. 

Joseph Allen Phillips, Extension Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., Iowa State University. 

Lyle Llewellyn Phillips, Professor of Crop Science and Genetics. Ph.D., University of 
Washington. 

Richard Michael Philpot, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Todd Huntley Pierce, Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 
Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

Leonard Joseph Pietrafesa, Associate Professor of Oceanography. Ph.D., University of 
Washington. 

Julius Carl Poindexter Jr., Associate Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

George Waverly Poland, Professor Emeritus of Foreign Languages and Literatures. Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina. 

Daniel Townsend Pope, Research Professor Emeritus of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., Cor- 
nell University. 

Joseph Alexander Porter Jr., Professor and Acting Associate Head of the Department of Tex- 
tile Materials and Management, M.S., North Carolina State University. 

Ira Deward Porterfield, Professor of Animal Science. Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Dillard Martin Powell, Adjunct Associate Professor of Textile Materials and Management. 
J.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

James Douglas Powell, Associate Professor of Computer Science. Ph.D., University of Ken- 
tucky. 

Nathaniel Thomas Powell, Professor of Plant Pathology and Genetics. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Anco Luning Prak, The James T. Ryan Professor of Industrial Engineering. Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

Richard Joseph Preston, Professor Emeritus of Forestry and Dean Emeritus of the School of 
Forest Resources. Ph.D., University of Michigan. 

William S. Price Jr., Adjunct Assistant Professor of History. Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Walter Ray Prince, Associate Professor of Poultry Science. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Charles Harry Proctor, Professor of Statistics. Ph.D., Michigan State University. 

Dalton Ray Proctor, Extension Assistant Professor of Adult and Community College Educa- 
tion and Specialist in Charge of Agricultural Extension. Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic In- 
stitute and State University. 

Charles Ray Pugh, Extension Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., Purdue Uni- 
versity. 

Albert Ernest Purcell, Professor (USDA) of Food Science. Ph.D., Purdue University. 

Mohan Putcha, Associate Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of California at Santa 
Barbara. 

Thomas Lavelle Quay, Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

John William Querry, Associate Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. Ph.D., State Uni- 
versity of Iowa. 

Charles Price Quesenberry, Professor of Statistics. Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 

Robert Lamar Rabb, Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Allen Huff Rakes, Professor of Animal Science. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Robert Todd Ramsay, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of Miami. 

Harold Arch Ramsey, Professor of Animal Science. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

James Patrick Rand, Assistant Professor of Design. M.Arch., University of Oregon. 

Charles David RaperJr., Associate Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., Purdue University. 

Gary R. Rassel, Assistant Professor of Political Science. Ph.D., Michigan State University. 

James Chester Raulston Jr., Associate Professor of Horticultural Science and Landscape 
Architecture. Ph.D., University of Maryland. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 303 

John Oren Rawlings, Professor of Statistics and Genetics. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Horace Darr Rawls, Professor Emeritus of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., Duke Uni- 
versity. 

Rachel F. Rawls, Associate Professor of Psychology. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Bibekananda Ray, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Food Science. Ph.D., University of Min- 
nesota. 

Isaac Epps Ready, Adjunct Professor of Adult and Community College Education. Ed.D., 
New York University. 

Ralph Heath Reeves, Associate Professor of Wood and Paper Science. Ph.D., Institute of 
Paper Chemistry. 

Thomas Howard Regan, Associate Professor of Philosophy. Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Willis Alton Reid, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Thomas W. Reiland, Assistant Professor of Statistics and Operations Research. Ph.D., 
Florida State University. 

Richard AUyn Reinert, Professor (USD A) of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., University of Wiscon- 
sin. 

Lawrence W. Reiter, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., University of Kansas 
Medical Center. 

William Frederick Reiter Jr., Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 
Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

GuntherJohn Phillip Reuer, Associate Professor of Architecture. Ph.D., Frei University. 

James F. Reynolds, Assistant Professor of Botany. Ph.D., New Mexico State University. 

Michael Shane Reynolds, Associate Professor of English. Ph.D., Duke University. 

Donald Robert Rhodes, University Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., Ohio State 
University. 

Theodore Roosevelt Rice, Adjunct Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Frances Marian Richardson, Research Associate Professor of Engineering Research, Ser- 
vices Division. M.S., University of Cincinnati. 

Gregory Neil Richardson, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., University of 
California at Los Angeles. 

William Lawrence Richards III, Visiting Assistant Professor of Zoology and Assistant Direc- 
tor, N.C. Sea Grant Program. Ph.D., University of Miami. 

John Marion Riddle, Professor of History and Assistant Head of the Department. Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina. 

Don Lee Ridgeway, Professor of Statistics and Physics. Ph.D., University of Rochester. 

Jackson Ashcraft Rigney, Professor of Statistics and Dean for International Programs. M.S., 
Iowa State College. 

John S. Risley, Assistant Professor of Physics. Ph.D., University of Washington. 

Wayne Philip Robarge, Assistant Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Woodrow Ernest Robbins, Associate Professor of Computer Science. Ph.D., Syracuse Uni- 
versity. 

John Frederick Roberts, Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., University of Arizona. 

William Milner Roberts, Professor of Food Science and Head of the Department. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Minnesota. 

Robert LaFon Robertson, Extension Professor of Entomology. M.S., Auburn University. 

Mendel Leno Robinson Jr., Associate Professor of Textile Materials and Management and 
Academic Coordinator for the School of Textiles. Ed.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Ward Rhyne Robinson, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Agricultural Education. Ed.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

Odis Wayne Robison, Professor of Animal Science and Genetics. Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin. 

Theodore George Rochow, Associate Professor Emeritus of Textile Materials and Manage- 
ment. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

George Calvert Rock, Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., Cornell University. 



304 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Hugo Homer Rogers Jr., Assistant Professor (USDA) of Botany. Ph.D., University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Roger Phillip Rohrbach, Associate Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 
Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Ernest William Rolliris, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. Ph.D., 
Vanderbilt University. 

Maria C. Romanach, Assistant Professor of Design. M. of Arch., Princeton University. 

Nicholas John Rose, Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., New York University. 

Laurence S. Rosenstein, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biological and Agricultural 
Engineering. Ph.D., University of Cincinnati. 

John Paul Ross, Professor (USDA) of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

John Arthur Roulier, Associate Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., Syracuse University. 

Thelma Louise Roundtree, Adjunct Professor of Education. Ph.D., Emory University. 

Ronald W. Rousseau, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D., Louisiana State 
University. 

Larry Herbert Royster, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

Eva Redfield Rubin, Assistant Professor of Political Science. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. 

Paul James Rust, Associate Professor Emeritus of Education. Ph.D., University of 
Washington. 

Henry Ames Rutherford, Cone Mills Professor Emeritus of Textile Chemistry. M.S., George 
Washington University. 

Ronald Herbert Sack, Associate Professor of History. Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 

Hans Sagan, Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of Vienna. 

Edward Aaron Saibel. Adjunct Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Ph.D., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

Pedro A. Sanchez, Associate Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Douglas Charles Sanders, Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., University of 
Minnesota. 

0. Thomas Sanders Jr., Assistant Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
and State University. 

Henry Sanoff, Professor of Architecture. M.Arch., Pratt Institute. 

Frank Dorrance Sargent, Professor of Animal Science. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Joseph Neal Sasser, Professor of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., University of Maryland. 

Preston Eugene Sasser, Adjunct Associate Professor of Textile Materials and Management. 
Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Walter Joseph Saucier, Professor of Meteorology. Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Man Mohan Saichney, Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., Indian Agricultural 
Research Institute. 

Raymond Frederick Saxe, Professor of Nuclear Engineering. Ph.D., University of Liverpool. 

Dale Edward Sayers, Assistant Professor of Physics. Ph.D., University of Washington. 

LeRoy Charles Saylor, Professor of Genetics and Forestry and Associate Dean of the School 
of Forest Resources. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

John G. Scandalios, Professor of Genetics and Head of the Department. Ph.D., University of 
Hawaii. 

Clarence Cayce Scarborough, Professor Emeritus of Agricultural Education. Ed.D., Uni- 
versity of Illinois. 

Henry Elkin Schaffer, Professor of Genetics. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Stephen Schecter, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of California at 
Berkeley. 

Jan Frederick Schetzina, Associate Professor of Physics. Ph.D., Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity. 

Donald Peter Schmitt, Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., Iowa State Uni- 
versity. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 305 

Howard A. Schneider, Professor of Nutrition and Director of the Institute of Nutrition. 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Edivard Martin SchoenbornJr., Charles H. Herty Professor Emeritus of Chemical Engineer- 
ing. Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Anton Franz Schreiner, Associate Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Hans T. Schreuder, Adjunct Associate Professor of Forestry and Statistics. Ph.D., Iowa 
State University. 

Ronald Arthur Schrimper, Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Michael D. Schulman, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. 

Grant M. Scobie, Assistant Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Herbert Temple Scofield, Professor Emeritus of Botany. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Donald M. Scott, Assistant Professor of History. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Lewis Worth Seagondollar, Professor of Physics. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

James A rthur Seagraves. Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., Iowa State College. 

John Frank Seely, Professor of Chemical Engineering. M.Ch.E., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Kenyon Bertel Segner III, Assistant Professor of Adult and Community College Education. 
Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

James Francis Selgrade, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of Wiscon- 
sin. 

Heinz Seltmann, Professor (USDA) of Botany. Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Ernest Daxns Seneca, Associate Professor of Botany and Soil Science. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Robert C. Serow, Assistant Professor of Curriculum and Instruction. Ph.D., Cornell Univer- 
sity. 

Henry Anthony Shannon, Associate Professor Emeritus of Science Education. Ed.M., Uni- 
versity of Missouri. 

Morton Russell Shaw, Professor of Textiles and Assistant Dean for Textile Research. Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins University. 

Ronald Wilson Shearon, Professor of Adult and Community College Education. Ed.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

Thomas Jackson Sheets, Professor of Entomology, Crop Science and Horticultural Science. 
Ph.D., University of California at Davis. 

Rowland McLamb Shelley, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

James Edivard Shelton, Assistant Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., North Carolina State 
University. 

Jason C. H. Shih, Assistant Professor of Poultry Science. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Paul Beck Shoemaker, Extension Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., Cornell 
University. 

Vernon Frederick Shogren, Professor of Architecture. M.Arch., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 

Thomas Clinard Shore Jr., Assistant Professor of Industrial and Technical Education. Ed.D., 
University of Maryland. 

Douglas Dean Short, Associate Professor of English. Ph.D., Duke University. 

Chrystos Dmitry Siderelis, Assistant Professor of Recreation Resources Administration. 
Ph.D., University of New Mexico. 

Charles Edward Siewert, Associate Professor of Nuclear Engineering. Ph.D., University of 
Michigan. 

Leon David Silber, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology. Ed.D., University of 
Massachusetts. 

Robert Silber, Associate Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., Clemson University. 

Donald Glick Simmons, Associate Professor of Veterinary Science, Microbiology and Poultry 
Science. Ph.D., University of Georgia. 

Richard Lee Simmons, Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., University of California 
at Berkeley. 



306 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Ronald Dale Simpson, Associate Professor of Mathematics and Science Education. Ed.D., 
University of Georgia. 

Michael F. Singer, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of California. 

Rudra Pratap Singh, Adjunct Professor of Wood and Paper Science. Ph.D., University of 
Adelaide, Australia. 

Robert E. Singleton, Adjunct Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 
Ph.D., California Institute of Technology. 

Edward Carroll Sisler, Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Crop Science. Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

Richard W. Skaggs. Associate Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering and Soil 
Science. Ph.D., Purdue University. 

Walter Arthur Skroch, Extension Professor of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin. 

Charles SmallwoodJr., Professor of Civil Engineering. M.S., Harvard University. 

Frederick Otto Smetana, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Southern California. 

Benjamin Warfield Smith, Professor of Genetics and Botany. Ph.D., University of Wiscon- 
sin. 

Clyde Fuhriman Smith, Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Donald E. Smith, Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Farmer Sterling Smith, Associate Professor of Industrial and Technical Education. Ed.D., 
North Carolina State University. 

Frank Houston Smith, Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. M.S., North Carolina State 
University. 

Frank James Smith, Associate Professor of Psychology. Ph.D., Michigan State University. 

Henry Brower Smith, Professor of Chemical Engineering and Associate Dean for Research 
and Graduate Studies, School of Engineering. Ph.D., University of Cincinnati. 

J. C. Smith, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., Purdue University. 

Norwood Graham Smith, Associate Professor of English. M.A., Duke University. 

William Adams Smith Jr., Professor of Industrial Engineering and Head of the Department. 
Eng.Sc.D., New York University. 

William Edward Smith, Professor of Recreation Resources Administration. Ed.D., George 
Peabody College. 

Jean Johannessen Smoot, Associate Professor of English. Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Ronald Ernest Sneed, Extension Associate Professor of Biological and Agricultural 
Engineering. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Wesley Edwin Snyder, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., University of 
Illinois. 

PaulD. Sommers, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of Texas. 

Arnold M. Sookne, Adjunct Professor of Textile Chemistry. M.S., George Washington Uni- 
versity. 

Kenneth Alan Sorensen, Extension Associate Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., Kansas State 
University. 

John C. Sorenson, Assistant Professor of Genetics. Ph.D., University of South Carolina. 

Marvin Stanley Soroos, Associate Professor of Political Science. Ph.D., Northwestern Uni- 
versity. 

Furman Yates Sorrell Jr., Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Ph.D., 
California Institute of Technology. 

Russell M. Southall, Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Robert Seago Sowell, Associate Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. Ph.D., 
North Carolina State University. 

Jason Loy Sox Jr., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Marvin Luther Speck, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Food Science and Microbiology 
and Graduate Administrator in Food Science. Ph.D., Cornell University. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 307 

Herbert Elvin Speece, Professor of Mathematics and Mathematics Education and Head of 
the Department of Mathematics and Science Education. Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina. 

Harvey Wesley Spurr Jr., Professor (USDA) of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin. 

David Roland Squire, Adjunct Professor of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D., Rice University. 

Edward M. Stack, Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. Ph.D., Princeton Uni- 
versity. 

Hans Heinrich Stadelmaier, Research Professor of Metallurgy in Engineering Research. 
Dr.rer.nat., T. H. Stuttgart. 

Edward Paul Stahel, Professor of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

Ephraim Stam, Associate Professor of Nuclear Engineering. Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute. 

Alfred J. Stamm, Reuben B. Robertson Professor Emeritus of Wood and Paper Science. 
Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Vivian Thomas Stannett, Camille Dreyfus Professor of Chemical Engineering; Vice Provost 
and Dean of the Graduate School. Ph.D., Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. 

John Staudhammer, Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., University of California at 
Los Angeles. 

Robert George Douglas Steel, Professor of Statistics and Graduate Administrator. Ph.D., 
Iowa State University. 

Donald Henry John Steensen, Associate Professor of Forestry and Wood and Paper Science. 
Ph.D., Duke University. 

Allen Frederick Stein, Associate Professor of English. Ph.D., Duke University. 

Stanley George Stephens, William Neal Reynolds Professor Emeritus of Genetics. Ph.D., 
Edinburgh University. 

Robert Elmer Sternloff, Professor of Recreation Resources Administration. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. 

William Damon Stevenson Jr., Professor of Electrical Engineering, Associate Head of the 
Department and Graduate Administrator. M.S., University of Michigan. 

Debra Wehrle Stewart, Assistant Professor of Political Science. Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Joan Hinde Stewart, Associate Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. Ph.D., Yale 
University. 

Hamilton Arlo Stewart, Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. Ph.D., University of Min- 
nesota. 

Shaler Stidham Jr., Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering. Ph.D., Stanford Uni- 
versity. 

Ronald Edwin Stinner, Associate Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., University of California 
at Berkeley. 

Robert Edwin Stipe, Lecturer in Design. M. of Regional Planning, University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Ernest Lester Stitzinger, Associate Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of 
Pittsburgh. 

Edward F. Stoddard, Assistant Professor of Geology. Ph.D., University of California at Los 
Angeles. 

Roy Wesley Stonecyper, Adjunct Associate Professor of Forestry. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Robert Franklin Stoops, Research Professor of Materials Engineering and Director of Engi- 
neering Services Division. Ph.D., Ohio State University. 

David Lewis Strider, Professor of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Raymond William Stroh, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., Polytechnic 
Institute of Brooklyn. 

Raimond Aldrich Struble, Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of Notre Dame. 

Duncan Robert Stuart, Professor of Design. 

Charles William Stuber, Professor (USDA) of Genetics. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 



308 THE GRADUATE CATALOG. 

William Clifton Stuckey Jr., Associate Professor of Textile Materials and Management. M.S., 
North Carolina State University. 

Jon M. Stucky, Assistant Professor of Botany. Ph.D., Texas Technical University. 

Charles Wilson Suggs, Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

Arthur L. Sullivan, Associate Professor of Design and Forestry and Director of the 
Landscape Architecture Program. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Gene Autry Sullivan, Associate Professor of Crop Science. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Joseph Gwyn Sutherland, Professor Emeritus (USDA) of Economics and Business. Ph.D., 
North Carolina State University. 

Jimmie Ray Suttle, Adjunct Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

Paul Porter Sutton, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

Turner Bond Sutton, Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., North Carolina State 
University. 

Elizabeth Manny Suval, Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

Stanley S. Suval, Professor of History. Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Harold Everett Swaisgood, Professor of Food Science and Biochemistry. Ph.D., Michigan 
State University. 

Algernon G. Sivan, Adjunct Professor of Industrial Engineering. Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Ernst Warner Swanson, Professor Emeritus of Economics and Business. Ph.D., University 
of Chicago. 

James Edwin Swiss, Assistant Professor of Political Science. Ph.D., Yale University. 

William Lawrence Switzer, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Edith Dudley Sylla, Associate Professor of History. Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Richard Eugene Sylla, Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Kuo-chung Tai, Assistant Professor of Computer Science. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Banks Cooper Talley Jr., Associate Professor of Guidance and Personnel Services and Vice 
Chancellor for Student Affairs. Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

Fred Russell TarverJr., Extension Professor of Food Science. Ph.D., University of Georgia. 

E. Wayne Taylor, Associate Professor of Architecture. B.A., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Lanelle Selby Taylor, Assistant Professor of Psychology. Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

John O. Tector, Assistant Professor of Design. M.ASc, University of Waterloo. 

Paul Tesar, Assistant Professor of Design. M.A., University of Washington. 

Alan Lee Tharp, Associate Professor of Computer Science. Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

James Paul Thaxton, Associate Professor of Poultry Science. Ph.D., University of Georgia. 

Gordon Wallace Thayer, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., North Carolina 
State University. 

Paul W. Thayer, Professor of Psychology and Head of the Department. Ph.D., Ohio State 
University. 

Elizabeth C. Theil, Associate Professor of Biochemistry. Ph.D., Columbia University. 

Michael Herbert Theil, Associate Professor of Textile Chemistry. Ph.D., Polytechnic In- 
stitute of Brooklyn. 

Frank Bancroft Thomas, Extension Professor of Food Science. Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 
University. 

Hollis Allen Thomas, Adjunct Associate Professor of Forestry. Ph.D., Rutgers University. 

JoabL. Thomas, Professor of Botany and Chancellor. Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Richard Joseph Thomas, Professor of Wood and Paper Science and Botany. Ph.D., Duke Uni- 
versity. 

Donald Loraine Thompson, Professor (USDA) of Crop Science and Genetics. Ph.D., Iowa 
State College. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 309 

Edwin Gilbert Thurlow, Professor Emeritus of Landscape Architecture. M.L.A., Harvard 
University. 

David Ronald Tilley, Professor of Physics. Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

Robert 0. Tilman, Professor of Politics and Dean of the School of Humanities and Social 
Sciences. Ph.D., Duke University. 

David Harry Timothy, Professor of Crop Science, Botany and Genetics. Ph.D., University of 
Minnesota. 

Frederick Joseph Tischer, Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., University of Prague. 

James A. Tompkins, Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering. Ph.D., Purdue Uni- 
versity. 

William Bell Toole HI, Professor of English and Associate Dean of the School of Humani- 
ties and Social Sciences. Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 

William Douglas Toussaint, Professor and Head of the Department of Economics and 
Business. Ph.D., Iowa State College. 

Samuel B. Tove, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Animal Science and Biochemistry and 
Head of the Department of Biochemistry. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Curtis Trent, Professor of Adult and Community College Education. Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin. 

Robert James Trew Jr., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., University of 
Michigan. 

Anastasios Christos Triantaphyllou, Professor of Genetics. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Hedwig Hirschmann Triantaphyllou, Professor of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., University of 
Erlangen, Germany. 

James Richard Troyer, Professor of Botany. Ph.D., Columbia University. 

Ted Lee Tsui, Assistant Professor of Meteorology. Ph.D., University of Missouri. 

Harry Tucker Jr., Associate Professor of Foreign Languages and Literatures. Ph.D., Ohio 
State University. 

Paul Arthur Tucker Jr., Associate Professor of Textile Materials and Management. Ph.D., 
North Carolina State University. 

William Preston Tucker, Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Ph.D., University of 
North Carolina. 

Chi Chao Tung, Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 

Carl Byron Turner, Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., Duke University. 

Lester Curtiss Ulberg, Professor of Animal Science. Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

David Frederick Ullrich, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., Carnegie Institute of 
Technology. 

Herbert A. Undenvood Jr., Assistant Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., University of Texas. 

Claude Richard Unrath, Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., Michigan State 
University. 

Mehmet Eyisar Uyanik, Professor of Civil Engineering. Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Odell Uzzell, Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., Ohio State Uni- 
versity. 

John G. Vandenbergh, Professor of Zoology and Head of the Department. Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania State University. 

Hubertus Robert van der Vaart, Drexel Professor of Statistics and Mathematics. Ph.D., 
Leiden University. 

Albert Donald VanDeVeer, Associate Professor of Philosophy. Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

John Wey Van Duyn, Associate Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., Clemson University. 

Cecil Gerald Van Dyke, Assistant Professor of Botany and Plant Pathology. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Illinois. 

Michael L. Vasu, Assistant Professor of Political Science. Ph.D., Southern Illinois Uni- 
versity. 

Venkatesh Venkatakrishnan, Assistant Professor of Wood and Paper Science. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Idaho. 

Kuruvilla Verghese, Professor of Nuclear Engineering and Graduate Administrator. Ph.D., 
Iowa State University. 



310 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Maurice Earl Voland, Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., Michigan State Uni- 
versity. 

Richard James Volk, Professor of Soil Science and Horticultural Science. Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

George Henry WahlJr., Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., New York University. 

Harvey Edward Wahls, Professor of Civil Engineering and Graduate Administrator. Ph.D., 
Northwestern University. 

Jay Townsend Wakeley, Adjunct Professor of Statistics. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Mary Louise Walek, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., University 
of Florida. 

John Nelsoyi Wall Jr., Assistant Professor of English. Ph.D., Harvard University. 

Monroe Eliot Wall, Adjunct Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., Rutgers University. 

James Clarence Wallace, Professor of University Studies. J.D., University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill. 

James Macauley Wallace, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., In- 
diana University. 

Richard Gaither Walser, Professor Emeritus of English. M.A., University of North Carolina. 

William Kershaw Walsh, Professor of Textile Chemistry. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

William Mood Walter Jr., Professor (USDA) of Food Science. Ph.D., University of Georgia. 

Thomas Noble Walters, Associate Professor of English and Education. Ed.D., Duke Uni- 
versity. 

Arthur Walter Waltner, Professor of Physics. Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 

James Britton Ward, Professor of Poultry Science. Ph.D., Michigan State University. 

Thomas Marsh Ward, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Frederick Gail Warren, Professor of Food Science and Teaching Coordinator. Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania State College. 

Marlin Roger Warren Jr., Professor of Recreation Resources Administration. Dr. Rec, Uni- 
versity of Indiana. 

John Louis Wasik, Professor of Statistics and Psychology. Ed.D., Florida State University. 

William Meade Waters Jr., Associate Professor of Mathematics and Science Education and 
Mathematics. Ph.D., Florida State University. 

Gerald Francis Watson, Associate Professor of Meteorology. Ph.D., Florida State Uni- 
versity. 

Larry Wayne Watson, Associate Professor of Mathematics Education. Ph.D., Duke Uni- 
versity. 

Allen Howard Weber, Associate Professor of Meteorology. Ph.D., University of Utah. 

Jerome Bernard Weber, Professor of Crop Science and Soil Science. Ph.D., University of 
Minnesota. 

Sterling Barg Weed, Professor of Soil Science. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Gerald Thomas Weekman, Extension Professor of Entomology, In Charge Entomology Ex- 
tension. Ph.D., Iowa State University. 

Willard Wesley Weeks, Associate Professor of Crop Science. Ph.D., University of Kentucky. 

Bruce S. Weir, Visiting Associate Professor of Statistics. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Robert J. Weir, Liaison Geneticist and Director of the Industry— North Carolina State Un- 
iversity Pine Tree Improvement Research Cooperative. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Robert H. Weisberg, Assistant Professor of Geosciences. Ph.D., University of Rhode Island. 

Charles William Welby, Professor of Geosciences. Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 

Frederick Lovejoy Wellman, Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin. 

Bertram Whittier Wells, Professor Emeritus of Botany. Ph.D., University of Chicago. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 311 

Carol Glenn Wells, Adjunct Professor of Soil Science and Forestry. Ph.D., University of 

Wisconsin. 
J. C. Wells, Extension Professor of Plant Pathology. M.S.A., University of Georgia. 
Robert Charles Wells, Extension Professor of Economics and Business and Assistant Head 

of the Department. Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Ronald Earle Welty, Professor (USDA) of Plant Pathology. Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Thomas Ralph Wentworth, Assistant Professor of Botany. Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Earl Allen Wernsman, Professor of Crop Science and Genetics. Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Dennis William Wertz, Associate Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., University of South 

Carolina. 
Oscar Wesler, Professor of Statistics and Mathematics. Ph.D., Stanford University 
Walter J. Wessels, Assistant Professor of Economics and Business. Ph.D., University of 

Chicago. 
Harry Carter West, Associate Professor of English. Ph.D., Duke University. 
Bert Whitley Westbrook, Professor of Psychology. Ed.D., Florida State University. 
Philip Wayne Westerman, Assistant Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Kentucky. 
Joseph Arthur Weybrew, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Crop Science. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin. 
Wilson Monroe Whaley, Professor of Textile Chemistry and Head of the Department. Ph.D., 

University of Maryland. 
Elisabeth Anne Wheeler, Visiting Assistant Professor of University Studies and Wood and 

Paper Science. Ph.D., Southern Illinois University. 
Mary Elizabeth Wheeler, Associate Professor of History and Head of the Department. Ph.D., 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Thomas Burton Whitaker, Professor (USDA) of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Estelle Edwards White, Visiting Associate Professor of Adult and Community College 

Education. Ed.D., North Carolina State University. 
Raymond Cyrus White, Professor of Chemistry. Ph.D., West Virginia University. 
Robert Benjamin White Jr., Professor of English and Assistant Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Robert Ernest White, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of 

Massachusetts. 
John Kerr Whitfield, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Ph.D., Virginia 

Polytechnic Institute. 
Larry Alston Whitford, Professor Emeritus of Botany. Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
John Mallory Whitsett, Associate Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., University of Texas. 
Margaret Utley Wiebe, Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychology. Ph.D., Duke University. 
John Clark Wilk, Associate Professor of Animal Science. Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Richard R. Wilkinson, Professor of Landscape Architecture and Forest Resources. M.L.A., 

University of Michigan. 
James Clifford Williams, III, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and 

Associate Head of the Department. Ph.D., University of Southern California. 
James Oliver Williams, Associate Professor of Political Science. Ph.D., University of North 

Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Joel Lawson Williams, Adjunct Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. Ph.D., North 

Carolina State University. 
Mary Cameron Williams, Professor of English. Ph.D., University of North Carolina at 

Chapel Hill. 
Porter Williams Jr., Professor of English. M.A., Cambridge University; University of 

Virginia. 
Robert T. Williams, Assistant Professor of Industrial and Technical Education and Associate 

Dean of the School of Education. Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
James Claude Williamson Jr., Professor of Economics and Business. M.S., North Carolina 

State University. 



312 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Norman Francis Williamson Jr., Assistant Professor of Computer Science. Ph.D., North 
Carolina State University. 

Daniel Hoover Willits, Assistant Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 
Ph.D., University of Kentucky. 

James Blake Wilson, Associate Professor of Mathematics. Ph.D., University of Florida. 

L. George Wilson, Extension Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., Michigan 
State University. 

Richard Ferrol Wilson, Assistant Professor (USDA) of Crop Science. Ph.D., University of 
Illinois. 

Ronald Coleman Wimberley, Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Tennessee. 

Nash Nicks Winstead, Professor of Plant Pathology and Provost and Vice Chancellor. Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin. 

Lowell Sheridan Winton, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics. Ph.D., Duke University. 

George Herman Wise, William Neal Reynolds Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. Ph.D., 
University of Minnesota. 

Edward Hempstead Wiser, Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. Ph.D., 
North Carolina State University. 

Bernard Wishy, Professor of History. Ph.D., Columbia University. 

Augustus M. Witherspoon, Associate Professor of Botany. Ph.D., North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 

Peter Nicholas Witt, Adjunct Professor of Zoology. M.D., University of Tuebingen. 

JoelM. Wittkamp, Associate Professor of Design. M.F.A., Royal College of Art, London. 

Horst Richard Wittman, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Graz, Austria. 

Thomas G. Wolcott, Assistant Professor of Zoology. Ph.D., University of California. 

Arthur George Wollum II, Professor of Soil Science, Forestry and Microbiology. Ph.D., 
Oregon State University. 

William Garland Woltz, Professor Emeritus of Soil Science. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

IhnJae Won, Assistant Professor of Geophysics. Ph.D., Columbia University. 

Denis Wood, Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture. Ph.D., Clark University. 

James Woodburn, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Dr. Engr., Johns 
Hopkins University. 

William Walton Woodhouse Jr., Professor Emeritus of Soil Science. Ph.D., Cornell Uni- 
versity. 

Robert Wyllie Work, Professor Emeritus of Textiles. Ph.D., Cornell University. 

Arch Douglas Worsham, Professor of Crop Science. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Jimmie Jack Wortman, Adjunct Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., Duke Uni- 
versity. 

Charles Gerald Wright, Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 

Joan W. Wright, Associate Professor of Adult and Community College Education. Ph.D., 
Cornell University. 

Tommy Elmer Wynn, Assistant Professor of Botany. Ph.D., Purdue University. 

Johnny Calvin Wynne, Assistant Professor of Crop Science. Ph.D., North Carolina State 
University. 

Robert Takichi Yamamoto, Associate Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

Clyde Thomas Young, Associate Professor of Food Science. Ph.D., Oklahoma State Uni- 
versity. 

David Allen Young Jr., Professor of Entomology. Ph.D., University of Kansas. 

James Herbert Young, Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. Ph.D., 
Oklahoma State University. 

James Neal Young, Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., University of Kentucky. 

Robert V. Young Jr., Assistant Professor of English. Ph.D., Yale University. 

Talmage Brian Young, Associate Professor of Industrial Arts Education and Coordinator of 
the Program. Ed.D., University of Florida. 

John Roland Yow, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 
Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 313 

Mohamed Gamal Zaalouk, Adjunct Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. Ph.D., 

North Carolina State University. 
Donald C. Zeiger, Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. Ph.D., Rutgers University. 
Paul Zung-Teh Zia, Professor of Civil Engineering and Associate Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., University of Florida. 
Matthew Zingraff, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. Ph.D., Bowling 

Green State University. 
Bruce J. Zobel, Edwin F. Conger Professor of Forestry and Genetics. Ph.D., University of 

California at Berkeley. 
Carl Frank Zorowski, R. J. Reynolds Industries Professor of Mechanical Engineering, and 

Head of the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Ph.D., Carnegie In- 
stitute of Technology. 
Lloyd Robert Zumwalt, Professor of Nuclear Engineering. Ph.D., California Institute of 

Technology. 



314 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



INDEX 



Abbreviations used in catalog, 52 

Administration, 5 

Administration and Supervision, Education, 109-110 

Administrative Board of the Graduate School, 5 

Admission, 24-26; Full Graduate Standing, 25; 
Provisional Admission, 25; Graduate-Unclassified Stu- 
dents, 25-26; Post-Baccalaureate Studies (PBS), 26 

Adult and Community College Education, 53-54 

Advisory committee, master's degrees, 40; doctoral 
degrees, 46 

Agricultural Education, 107 

Air Conservation, 54-55 

Air Pollution, Triangle Universities Consortium on, 23 

Animal Science, 56-58 

Anthropology, see Sociology. 

Application, general, 24; fee, 24; foreign, 24 

Architecture, 58-61 

Assistantships, 33-35 

Audits, 28; fee, 31 



B 



Biochemistry, 61-63 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering, 64-66 

Biological Science, 66-67 

Biology Field Laboratory, 18 

Biomathematics, 67-68 

Botany, 69-72 



Personnel Services, 110-111; Industrial and Technical 
Education, 111-112; Industrial Arts Education, 112- 
113; Mathematics and Science Education, 113-114; Oc- 
cupational Education, 114-116; Special Education, 116- 
117; Education courses, 117-129. Also see Adult and 
Community College Education, 53-54, and Psychology, 
230-235 

Electrical Engineering, 129-134 

Electron Microscope Center, 19 

Engineering, 134-135 

Engineering Science and Mechanics, 39, 44, 46 

English, 135-138 

Entomology, 138-141 

Examination requirements, Master's degrees, 42-43; 
Doctoral degrees, 48-49 

Extension credit, 41 



Faculty, Graduate, 277-313 

Fees, see Tuition and Fees. 

Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships, 33-35 

Fiber and Polymer Science, 141-143 

Fields of Instruction, 52-274 

Financial Aid, 35-36, National Direct Student Loans, 35- 

36; Part-time Jobs, 36; Short-term Emergency Loans, 

36 
Food Science, 144-146 
Foreign Languages and Literatures, 146 
Forestry, 147-149 



Calendar, 6-11 

Candidacy, doctoral, 49 

Certificate renewal, public school, 26 

Chemical Engineering, 72-76 

Chemistry, 76-79 

Civil Engineering, 80-87 

Computer Science, 87-91 

Computer Studies, 91-93 

Computing facilities, 18 

Course load, 27-28 

Credit from outside sources, 41 

Credit hour requirement, master's degrees, 40 

Crop Science, 93-95 

Curriculum and Instruction, 108-109 

Curriculum Materials Center, 16, 106 



General Information, 24-38; Application, 24; Admission 
24-26; Registration, 27-28; Tuition and Fees, 29-32; 
Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships, 33-35; Other 
Financial Aid, 35-36; Military Education and Training, 
36-37; Health Services, 37; Housing, 37-38 

Genetics, 150-153 

Geology courses, 154-156 

Geosciences, 153-154 

Governors, Board of, UNC, 275-276 

Grades, 41 

Graduate Programs, 39-51; Master's Degrees, 39-45; Doc- 
tor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education Degrees, 45- 
51 

Graduate School, North Carolina State University, 15 

Guidance and Personnel Services, 110-111 



II 



Deadlines for theses, see Calendar. 

Design, 95-97 

Dissertation requirement, 49 

Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education degrees, 
45-51; Advisory Committee and Plan of Graduate 
Work, 46; Microfilming, 51; fee, 31; Residence Require- 
ment, 46-47; Grading and academic standing, 47; 
Language Requirements, 47-48; Preliminary Com- 
prehensive Examination, 48; Candidacy, 49; Final Oral 
Examination, 49; The Dissertation, 49; Time Limit, 49; 
Summary of procedures, 50-51 



E 



Ecology, 97-99 

Economics and Business, 99-105 

Education, 105-129; Agricultural Education, 107; 
Curriculum and Instruction, 108-109; Educational Ad- 
ministration and Supervision, 109-110; Guidance and 



Health Services, 37 
Highlands Biological Station, 19 
History, 157-159 
Horticultural Science, 159-162 
Housing, 37-38 



Industrial and Technical Education, 111-112 
Industrial Arts Education, 112-113 
Industrial Engineering, 162-167 
Interinstitutional registration, 27 
International Development, 167-168 
Institutes, 16-17; Research Triangle, 16; Institute of 
Statistics, 17; Water Resources Research Institute, 17 



Landscape Architecture, 168-170 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



315 



Language requirements, Master's degrees, 42; Doctoral 

degrees, 47-48 
Learning Center, 19 
Library, D. H. Hill, 15-16 
Loans, 35-36 

M 



institutional Registration, 27; Course load, 27-28; 

Seniors, 28; Audits, 28 
Reproductive Physiology Research Laboratory, 21-22 
Residence requirement, Master's degrees, 40; Doctoral 

degrees, 46-47 
Residence status, 32-33; Classification procedures, 33 



Management, 170-171 

Map of campus, 316-317 

Marine and Coastal Studies, Center for, 20 

Marine Sciences, 171-173 

Married student housing, 37-38 

Master's degrees, 39-45; Master of Science and Master of 
Arts, 39-43; Plan of work, 40; Advisory Committee, 40; 
Residence, 40; Credits, 40; Credit from Outside Sources, 
41; Grading and academic standing, 41; Language Re- 
quirements, 42; Thesis, 42; Comprehensive Written Ex- 
aminations, 42; Comprehensive Oral Examinations, 43; 
Time Limit, 43; Master's Degree in a Designated Field, 
43-44; Summary of procedures, 44-45 

Materials Engineering, 173-177 

Mathematics, 177-185 

Mathematics and Science Education, 113-114 

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 186-193 

Meterology, 194-195 

Microbiology, 196-197 

Microfilming fee for doctoral dissertation, 31 

Military Education and Training, 36-37 



N 



National Direct Student Loans, 35-36 

Nondiscrimination statement, 23 

North Carolina State University, 13-14; Administration, 

5 
North Carolina System, University of, 2-3 
Nuclear Engineering, 198-202 
Nuclear Laboratory, Triangle Universities, 22 
Nuclear Service Facilities, 20 
Nutrition, 202-203 







Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Research Program, 

22-23 
Occupational Education, 114-116 
Occupational Education, Center for, 20-21 
Operations Research, 203-208 



Pest Management, 209 

Pesticide Residue Research Laboratory, 21 

Physical examinations, 27 

Physical Oceanography, 209-210 

Physics, 210-214 

Physiology, 215-216 

Phytotrons, 22 

Plan of graduate work, master's degrees, 40; doctoral 

degrees, 46 
Plant Pathology, 217-220 
Political Science, 220-226 
Post-Baccalaureate Studies (PBS), 26 
Poultry Science, 226-227 
Probation and termination, academic, 41 
Product Design, 228-229 
Psychology, 230-235 



R 



Recreation Resources Administration, 235-237 

Refund of tuition and fees, 32 

Registration, 27-28; Physical Examinations, 27; Inter- 



Seniors, graduate credit, 28 

Sociology and Anthropology, 237-244 

Soil Science, 244-247 

Southeastern Plant Environment Laboratories — 
Phytotrons, 22 

Special Education, 116-117 

Special Laboratories and Facilities, 18-22; Biology Field 
Laboratory, 18; Computing Facilities, 18; Electron 
Microscope Center, 19; Highlands Biological Station, 
19; Learning Center, 19; Center for Marine and Coastal 
Studies, 20; Nuclear Service Facilities, 20; Center for 
Occupational Education, 20-21; Pesticide Residue 
Research Laboratory, 21; Reproductive Physiology 
Research Laboratory, 21-22; Southeastern Plant En- 
vironment Laboratories — Phytotrons, 22; Triangle Uni- 
versities Nuclear Laboratory, 22 

Special Programs, 22-23; Research Program at the Oak 
Ridge Associated Universities, 22-23; The Triangle Uni- 
versities Consortium on Air Pollution, 23 

Statistics, 247-255 

Statistics, Institute of, 17 

Statute of limitations, master's degrees, 43; doctoral 
degrees, 49 



Textile Chemistry, 257-258 
Textile Materials and Management, 258-261 
Textiles, 255-261 

Thesis, master's degrees, 42; doctoral degrees, 49 
Time limit, master's degrees, 43; doctoral degrees, 49 
Toxicology 261-262 
Transfer credit, 41 

Triangle Universities Consortium on Air Pollution, 23 
Triangle Universities Nulear Laboratory, 22 
Trustees, Board of. North Carolina State University, 275 
Tuition and Fees, 29-32, Semester Rates, 29; Required 
Fees, 29; Summer Rates (Per Session), 29-30; Special 
Registration and Fees, 30-31; Part-Time Students, 31; 
Full-Time Faculty and Employees, 31; Refund of Tui- 
tion and Fees, 32; Residence Status, 32-33; Classifica- 
tion Procedures, 33 



U 



Urban Design, 262-263 



Veterinary Science, 263-264 



W 



Water Resources, 264-268 
Water Resources Research Institute, 17 
Wood and Paper Science, 269-271 
Work-Study Program, 36 



Zoology, 271-274 



NORTH CAR 



o 



2 3 

LINA STATri UNIVERSITY 
1977 




Alexander Residence H 
Alumni Memorial Built 
Bagwell Residence Hall 
Becton Residence Hall 
Berry Residence Hall 
Biltmore Hall 
Bowen Residence Hall 
Bragaw Residence Hall 
Brooks Hall 

(Design School Addil 
Under Construction) 
Broughton Hall 
Burlington Engineering 
Bureau of Mines 
Carmichael Gymnasiurr 
Carroll Residence Hall 
Case Athletics Center 
Central Stores- ~ 
Chancellor's Residence 
Clark Hall Infirmary 




BUILDINGS 

19. Clark Laboratories 

20. Cox Hall 

21. Dabney Hall | 

22. Daniels Hall J _ , 

23. McKimmon Extension Education Center 

24. Farm Unit 5 i 

25. Field House ' 
D. Fraternity Co^rt 

26. Gardner Hall . 

27. Gardner Hall SAddition 

28. Gold Residence Hall 

29. Greenhouse — Agronomy 

30. Greenhouse — Biological Sciences 

31. Greenhouse — Horticulture 

32. Greenhouse — B40 Method Rd 

33. Greenhouse— Plant Pathology 
-34. ertnnetls ArmVial Health Lab 

35. Harrelson Ha lil 

36. Harris Hall 

37. D. H. Hill Library-original wing 

38 D. H. Hill Library-book stack tower 

39. D. H. Hill Library-Erdahl-Cloyd wing 

40 Hodges Wood Products Lab 

Bl 41. Holladay Hall 

42. Information denter 

43. Kilgore Hall 
BS 44. Laundry 

45. Leazar Hall 

46 Lee Residence Hall 

BR 47. Mann Hall . „ 

BU H E. S. King Village (17 apt. bldgs. A-Q) 

48 Memorial Tower 

CG 49. Metcalf Residence Hall 

50. Morris Building 

51 Nelson Textile Building 
52" TV7 r"BuiTaTngT~ 

53. Owen Residence Hall 

54. Page Hall 



IBM 
GRID CODE 



IBM 
CODE 



encE 



5-D 
4-D 
4-D 
4-C 
5-F 
6-F 
2-C 
4-F 
5-D 
5-D 
2-C 
5-D 
5-D 
5-D 
8-F 
5-D 
5-E 
5-D 
5-D 
5-C 
5-C 
5-C 
4-E 
2-B 
2-B 
6-D 
3-C 
3-B 
5-E 
4-C 
7-F 
3-A 
4-D 
3-C 
6-D 
4-C 
4-D 
3-C 



CL 

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DAN 

FH 

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65. 
66 
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68 
69. 
70 
71 
72 
73. 
74 
75. 
76 
77 
78 
79. 
80. 
1. 
82 
83. 
84 
85 
86 
87. 
88 
89 
90. 
91 



Park Shops 

Patterson Hall 

Peele Hall 

Physical Plant ShofDS 

Phytotron 

Poe Hall 

Polk Hall 

Power Plant 

Price Music Center 

Primrose Hall 

"Cultural Center 
University Graphic: 
Quad Snack Bar 
Wm. Neal Reynolds Coliseum 
Ricks Hall 

Riddick Engineering Labs 
Riddick Stadium 
Robertson Wing, B|ltmore Hall 
Schaub Food Science Building 
Scott Hall 
Steam Plant 
Students Supply St<j>re 
Sullivan Residence {Hall 
Syme Residence Hall 
Television Center ' 
Frank Thompson Theater 
Tompkins Hall 
Tucker Residence Hall 
TurLmfltotL Residence Hall 
University Student Center 
Watauga Hall 
Weaver Laboratories 
Welch Residence Hall 
Williams Hall 
Winston Hall 
Withers Hall 
Turner House 



COURTS AND FIELDS 

A. Becton-Berry Quad 

B. Court of North Carolina 

C. Doak Field 

D. Fraternity Court 

E. Gardner Arboretum 

F. Holladay Hall Court 

G. Lee-Braaaw Court 

H. E S King Villagie 

J. Miller Fields 

K. Syme-Brooks Court 

L. Track 

M. Tucker-Owen Court 

N. Turlington-Alexander Court 

O. University Plaza 

P. University Student Center Plaza 

PARKING LOTS 

Brooks Avenue Lpt 

Carmichael Lot ' 

Coliseum Bays j 

East Coliseum Lot 

Harris Lot 

Parking Deck 

Riddick Lot 

West Lot 

Sullivan Lot 

Sullivan Temporary Lot 





IBM 


GRID 


CODE 


3-C 


PS 


4-C 


PT 


3-B 




4-D 




5-D 


PHY 


3-C 


POE 


4-C 


PK 


3-C 




4-D 


PMC 


3-B 




5-D 




6-E 




2-C 




3-D 




4-C 


Rl 


3-C 


RD 


3-C 




4-E 




4-E 


SFS 


5-D 


SC 


4-E 




4-D 




6-E 




2-C 




6-F 


TVS 


2-C 


TT 


3-B 


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4-D 




^-LL 




3-D 


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2-B 




5-E 


DSW 


2-C 




5-D 


WMS 


4-B 


WN 


4-C 


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2-C 




3-B 




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4-C 




3-B 




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7-F 




4-E 




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2-D 




4-D 




4-D 




5-C 




3-D 




6-C 




3-D 




3-D 




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4-E 




2-C 




3-C 




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6-E 




7-E 





89th Annual 

Commencement 

North Carolina State University 

at Raleigh 



Saturday, May 13 

Nineteen Hundred and Seventy Eight 

Degrees Awarded 1977-78 



CORRECTED COPY 





DEGREES CONFERRED 




foTo^ ted A iSSUe ° f under S raduate ™d graduate degrees including degrees awarded June 
29, 1977, August 10, 1977, and December 21, 1977. 



Musical Program 

EXERCISES OF GRADUATION 
May 13, 1978 



CARILLON CONCERT: 8:30 A.M. The Memorial Tower 

Lucy Procter, Carillonneur 



COMMENCEMENT BAND CONCERT: 8:45 A.M. 

William Neal Reynolds Coliseum 



AMPARITO ROCA Texidor 



EGMONT, Overture Beeth 



oven 



PROCESSION OFTHE NOBLES Rimsky-Korsakov 

AMERICA THE BEAUTIFUL Ward-Dragon 



PROCESSIONAL: 9:15 A.M. 

March Processional Grundman 



RECESSIONAL: 

University Grand March Goldman 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY COMMENCEMENT BAND 
Donald B. Adcock, Conductor 



The Alma Mater 



Words by: Music by: 

Alvin M. Fountain, '23 Bonnie F. Norris, Jr., '23 

Where the winds of Dixie softly blow 
o'er the fields of Caroline, 

There stands ever cherished N. C. State, 
as thy honored shrine. 

So lift your voices; Loudly sing 
from hill to oceanside! 



Our hearts ever hold you, N. C. State, 
in the folds of our love and pride. 



Exercises of Graduation 

William Neal Reynolds Coliseum 

Joab L. Thomas, Chancellor 
Presiding 

May 13, 1978 

PROCESSIONAL, 9:15 A.M Donald B. Adcock 

Conductor, North Carolina State University Commencement Band 

The Audience is requested to remain seated during 
the Processional. 

INVOCATION The Reverend W. Joseph Mann 

Methodist Chaplain, North Carolina State University 

ADDRESS Roy H. Park 

President, Park Broadcasting Inc. and Park Newspapers, Inc. 

CONFERRING OF DEGREES Chancellor Joab L. Thomas 

Candidates for baccalaureate degrees presented by 
Deans of Schools. Candidates for advanced degrees 
presented by Dean of Graduate School. 

ADDRESS TO FELLOW GRADUATES Paul William Saxe 

Class of 1978 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF GOODWIFE AND 

GOODHUSBAND DIPLOMAS Harold Marriott Draper 

Salutatorian 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF OUTSTANDING 

TEACHER AWARDS Hilary Kate Ellwood 

Valedictorian 

REMARKS William C. Friday 

President, The University of North Carolina 

ALMA MATER Milton C. Bliss 

Assistant Director of Music 



The Audience is invited to stand and join in singing 
the Alma Mater. 

BENEDICTION 
RECESSIONAL 

The Audience is requested to remain seated until the 
Recessional music is completed. 

3 



Escorts for these graduation exercises 

provided by the Air Force ROTC 

and the Army ROTC 



Social Hour and Distribution 
of Diplomas 

School and Department Locations 

School of Agriculture and Life Sciences — 11:15 a.m. 

Adult Education Room 6, McKimmon Center, Western Boulevard 

Agronomy, Crop Science, Individualized Study Program, 

and Soil Science 2215 and 2223 Williams Hall 

Animal Science Room 2, McKimmon Center 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering 158 Weaver Laboratories 

Biological Sciences 222 Dabney Hall 

Biochemistry 

Biological Sciences Major 

Botany 

Ecology 

Entomology 

Genetics 

Microbiology 

Nutrition 

Pest Management 

Plant Pathology 

Conservation Back lobby of Coliseum or 2215 and 2223 Williams Hall 

Economics and Business Scott Pavilion, State Fairground 

Food Science 105 Schaub-Food Science Building 

Horticultural Science 121, 125 and 159 Kilgore Hall 

Poultry Science Baptist Student Center, 2702 Hillsborough Street 

Rural Sociology 218 Withers Hall 

Zoology back lobby of Coliseum 

Fisheries and Marine Biology 
Medical Technology 
Pre-Dental and Pre-Medical 
Wildlife Biology 
Zoology Majors 

School of Design— 11:30 a.m Stewart Theatre 

School of Education— 11:15 a.m. 

Administration and Supervision 205 Poe Hall 

Adult & Community College Education 6 McKimmon Center 



Agricultural Education Curriculum Materials Center, 400 Poe Hall 

Guidance & Personnel Service 220 Poe Hall 

Industrial Arts Education 218 Poe Hall 

Mathematics & Science Education 216 Poe Hall 

Occupational Education 209 Poe Hall 

Secondary Education, Special Education 

& Curriculum Instruction 211 Poe Hall 

Vocational Industrial Education and 

Technical Education 412 Poe Hall 

Psychology— 11:45 a.m 216 Poe Hall 

School of Engineering — 11:15 a.m. 

Biological & Agricultural Engineering 158 Weaver Laboratories 

Chemical Engineering 115 Riddick Laboratories 

Civil Engineering Lobby of Mann Hall 

Electrical Engineering Thompson Theatre 

Engineering Science and Mechanics Lobby of Mann Hall 

Engineering Operations 242 Riddick Laboratories 

Furniture Manufacturing and Management 234 Riddick Laboratories 

Industrial Engineering 234 Riddick Laboratories 

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering University Student Center Ballroom 

Materials Engineering Conference Room, Alumni Building 

Nuclear Engineering North Portico, Burlington Engineering Laboratories 

School of Forest Resources — 11:15 a.m Carmichael Gymnasium, west end, 

Main Floor 

School of Humanities and Social Sciences — 11:30 a.m. 

Economics and Business Scott Pavilion, State Fairground 

English, Foreign Languages and Literatures, 

Philosophy and Religion West Raleigh Presbyterian Church, 

27 Home Street 

History Theatre, Erdahl-Cloyd Union 

Political Science Court of North Carolina (Off Primrose Avenue) 

(213 Tompkins Hall in the event of inclement weather) 

Sociology 218 Withers Hall 

Speech-Communication Room 113, Tompkins Hall 

School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences— 11:15 a.m 117 Cox Hall 

School of Textiles— 11:15 a.m Campbell Auditorium, 240 Nelson Building 



ROTC COMMISSIONING 
CEREMONY 



Lieutenant Colonel Samuel A. Holcomb 
Presiding 

Stewart Theatre 

13 May 1978 

PROCESSIONAL MARCH, 2:00 P.M Donald B. Adcock 

Conductor, North Carolina State University Commencement Band 

The audience is requested to remain seated until Processional music is completed. 

national anthem 

INVOCATION The Reverend Stephen P. Gerhard 

Lutheran Chaplain, North Carolina State University 

INTRODUCTIONS Joab L. Thomas 

Chancellor, North Carolina State University 

ADDRESS Ralph E. Fadum 

Dean, School of Engineering 
North Carolina State University 

ADMINISTRATION OF OATH 

OF OFFICE Lieutenant Colonel Samuel A. Holcomb 

Professor of Military Science 

Lieutenant Colonel Harold D. Woods 

Professor of Aerospace Studies 

Captain Ronniere L. Burton 

US Marine Corps, Officer Selection Office 

PRESENTATION OF CERTIFICATES Ralph E. Fadum 

Dean, School of Engineering 
North Carolina State University 

BENEDICTION The Reverend Stephen P. Gerhard 

Lutheran Chaplain, North Carolina State University 

ARMED FORCES MEDLEY Donald B. Adcock 

Conductor, North Carolina State University 
Co m m encement Ba n d 



Academic Costume 

Academic gowns represent a tradition handed down from the universities of the 
Middle Ages. These institutions were founded by the Church; the students, being 
clerics, were obliged to wear the prescribed gowns at all times. Round caps later 
became square mortarboards; the hoods, originally cowls attached to the gowns, could 
be slipped over the head for warmth. 

Many European universities have distinctive caps and gowns which are different 
from those commonly used in this country. Some of the gowns are of bright colors and 
some are embellished with fur. A number of these may be noted in the procession. 

The usual color for academic gowns in the United States is black. The bachelor's 
gown is worn closed, the master's and doctor's may be worn open or closed. The shape 
of the sleeve is the distinguishing mark of the gown: bachelor— long pointed sleeves; 
master — oblong, square cut in back with an arc cut away in front; doctor — bell shaped. 

Caps are black. The tassels for the Ph.D. degree are gold and those for other 
graduate and professional degrees may be of the color corresponding to the trimmings 
on the hoods. The color of the tassels for bachelor's degrees indicates the curriculum of 
the graduate: Agriculture, maize; Design, brown; Education, light blue; Engineering, 
orange; Forest Resources, russet; Liberal Arts, white; Physical and Mathematical 
Sciences, yellow; Textiles, wine red. 

The hoods are lined with the color of the institution from which the wearer received 
his degree. The trimming or collar of the hood is the color which designates the degree: 
Liberal Arts, white; Fine Arts and Architecture, brown; Science, golden yellow; Music, 
pink; Divinity, scarlet; Law, purple; Engineering, orange; Philosophy, blue; Medicine, 
green; Forestry, russet; Textile, wine red. 

Honorary degree hoods are distinguished as follows: Master of Arts (M.A.), white; 
Doctor of Humane Letters (L.H.D.), white; Doctor of Sciences (Sc.D.), golden yellow; 
Doctor of Divinity (D.D.), scarlet; Doctor of Laws (L.L.D.), purple. 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



May 13, 1978 

School of Agriculture and 
Life Sciences 




BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGICAL AND 
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Jointly administered by the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the School 
of Engineering. See page 21 under the School of Engineering for a listing of the 
graduating seniors in the jointly administered program. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CONSERVATION 

Jointly administered by the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the School 
of Forest Resources. 

Fredrick York Alexander Statesville 

H**Harold Marriott Draper, III Pleasant Garden 

Lester Maxwell Greene Roanoke Rapids 

Vernon Caddy Janke Knightdale 

Joseph Merrill Lynch Roanoke Rapids 

Joseph Arthur Morawski Raleigh 

Harry Wayne Rakestraw Reidsville 

Eric Kavin Rawls Cary 

James Mason Sempsrott Raleigh 

Simon Leroy Shultman, III Charlotte 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Agricultural Economics 

*Jere Robert Buch Mountville, PA 

*James Robert Burgin Cary 

Robert Gerald Cody Marshall 

Thomas Malcolm Davidson Bethesda, MD 

*Silas Washington Davis, Jr Charlotte 

H*Mary Adams Ferebee Camden 



Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 



James Dillon Forbes Greenville 

Charles Lemuel Goode Raleigh 

William Ernest Johnson, Jr Bear Creek 

Arthur George McDonald Kingston, Jamaica 

Edward Lee McMillan, III Pfafftown 

Kirby Vaughn Pearce Wake Forest 

Marion Benton Pleasant, III Angier 

*Henry Wade Reece Boonville 

Donald Terrell Sinclair Lexington 

Marvin Lee Smith Rocky Mount 

Fred Street, III Forest City 

*David Moore Warren Durham 

•Gregory S. Williams Asheboro 

Agronomy 

Charles Reginald Bain Bunnlevel 

Garland Dallas Barnes Severn 

•Roger Raymond Black Thomasville 

Jan Nicolaas Bloemen Helmond, Netherlands 

H**David Wayne Britton Pendleton 

Wyatt Lane Brown Selma 

William Smithson Bugg, Jr Warrenton 

Gregory Lind Craver High Point 

John Winslow Cromwell, Jr Virginia Beach, VA 

Cameron Rusty Eaker Cherryville 

*Myron Ossie Fountain Richlands 

**Eric John Kolbinsky Durham 

John Michael Mann Boykins, VA 

♦Kenneth Neil McCaskill West End 

Tony Lee Patterson Stony Point 

H*Stephen Scott Strickland Smithfield 

••Frederick Martin Williams Wilmington 

H**Linda MacKay Williams Wilmington 

H**Henry Anderson Wilson, III Summerfield 

H*Stanley Jay Winslow Belvidere 

Animal Science 

*Robin Sidney Adair Beaufort 

Nancy Louise Angle Milton 

H*John Michael Beck High Point 

H*George Kenneth Blue Lawndale 

*Paula Ann Cash Apex 

*Larry Allan Cloninger Stanley 

Lance Laramie Clough Columbia 

Terry Eugene Combs North Wilkesboro 

H*Joseph Vann Cooper Pittsboro 

*Craig Alfred Corry Greensboro 

**Gerda Ann DeJong Pinetown 

H**Richard Choice Dixon Shelby 

Donna Sue Dorsey Fayetteville 

Barbara Ann Ellington Charlotte 



* Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

10 



John Thomas Elliott Lawndale 

H*Kathleen Gibson Laurinburg 

John Davis Gillis, II Fayetteville 

Dewey Glenn Godfrey, Jr Sanford 

Dixie Carol Grady Goldsboro 

Roy Neal Grose Harmony 

**James William Hadley Snow Camp 

*Tamara Sue Henderson Durham 

Sandra Kay Herre Gastonia 

Claude Danny Hicks Candor 

Johnnie Davis Hinsley, III Raleigh 

William George Johnson Shelby 

William Owen Johnson Statesville 

*Peggy Ann Johnston Laurinburg 

H*Karen Lynn Jones Pinnacle 

Norman Arthur Jordan, Jr Siler City 

Terry Wayne Kollman Colonial Heights, VA 

Ralph Douglas Lail Conover 

H*Philip Austin Langley Princeton 

H*Amy Jane Lewis Raleigh 

H*William Max Little, Jr Jefferson 

Kim Rochelle Logner Pinehurst 

Pamela Carol MacDonald China Grove 

Steven Lane McNeill Sanford 

William Jean Minton, Jr Cary 

Raymond Harrison Moore, Jr Sharpsburg 

*Stephan Allan Neuenschwander Swannanoa 

Robin Adell Owens Durham 

H**Rex Alan Pegram Lewisville 

H*Donna Marie Pope Winston-Salem 

**Ronald William Prestage Clinton 

*Daniel Lawrence Ragan Raleigh 

Larry Carl Sharpe Greensboro 

♦Benjamin Franklin Shelton, III Hobgood 

"Michael Elliott Sink Athens, GA 

Leslie Wayne Smith Albion, IL 

Randy Parks Stroud Statesville 

H*William Robert Utley Charlotte 

Mark Wayne Williams Salisbury 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

Gene Franklin Brisson Bladenboro 

Bobby Ray Gentry Roaring River 

Timothy Jon Gull Conover 

H**Joseph Michael Hanks Hays 

Robert Kent Hill Smithfield 

William Robert Mangum Lillington 

Dennis McCoy Powell Powellsville 

H*Luke Eldon Reese Taylorsville 

H*Gary Thomas Roberson Williamston 

David Allen Sartain Monroe 

Willis Keith Stroud Pink Hill 

Samuel Garfield Warren Chocowinity 



Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

11 



Biological Sciences 

H*Anita Louise Campbell Winston-Salem 

Iris Lorraine Clontz Charlotte 

H*Eugene Winston Coleman Charlotte 

H**Patsy Foster Daniels Lewisville 

Diane Ize DeGraffenreid Carrboro 

**Robert Cedric Dellinger, Jr Charlotte 

Kathryn Mills Fuller Raleigh 

John Joseph Hamer Garner 

James Robert Heyward, Jr Enka 

Richard Williams Howell Charlotte 

Paul Bennett Hutt Washington, DC 

H*Kurt Randall Jarnagin Chapel Hill 

Timothy Lee Jordan Ahoskie 

""Thomas Sellers Lease Raleigh 

•Robert Preston Lentz Burlington 

H**Harold David Leonard, Jr Greenville 

Rhonda Karen Malizka Luray, VA 

H**Richard Harvey Mann Raleigh 

Terry Dean Martin Granite Quarry 

*Mary Lou McMullen Charlotte 

**Timothy Lee Monteith Brevard 

H**Beth Ann Odom Jacksonville 

Carlos Jan Page Durham 

H*Douglas Mark Reed Atlanta, GA 

Richard E. Royal Charlotte 

*Paul Daniel Ryskiewich Burlington 

Susan Rebecca Setzer Forest City 

H*Freda Ann Snider Liberty 

George Benson Stearns Raleigh 

Kathy Carver Steinsberger Raleigh 

H*Scott Charles Steinsberger Raleigh 

H*Alisha Karen Stephens Charlotte 

**Alfred Gerald Strickland Bunn 

Julia Ann Williams Wingate 

Botany 

Fredrick York Alexander Statesville 

Rhonda Leah Britt Southern Pines 

H**Hilary Jane Brooks Oak Ridge 

H**Harold Marriott Draper, III Pleasant Garden 

Donnie Eugene Eplee Rutherfordton 

*Donna Sapp Fabric Gainesville, FL 

H*Thomas Alexander Melton, III Charlotte 

Mark Daniel Uhteg Kinston 

*Ann Clayton West Ft. Lauderdale, FL 

**Edward Michael Wolfe Sparta, NJ 

Crop Science 

**Mahshid Company Tehran, Iran 

Entomology 

*Keith Dennis Porter Clarendon, Jamaica 

* Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

12 



•Robert Thomas Veasey, Jr Aberdeen 

Ernest Marvin Watts, Jr Morganton 

**James Bryan Whitfield Raleigh 

Food Science 

**Jill Edith Armstrong Swansboro 

Betty Lynn Boswell Lucama 

James Kenneth Boyte Roxie, MS 

H**Elizabeth Louise Coletti Chicago, IL 

Neal Alan Cowan Winston-Salem 

Julia Gale Gibson High Point 

Paul Edward Hill Flat Rock 

*Deborah Neel Maya Albemarle 

**Margaret Kay Treadwell Wilmington 

Horticultural Science 

Ruth Whiting Adams Asheville 

Cynthia Grace Bailey Wilmington 

Paula Rae Bell Greensboro 

**Fred Baird Blackley Matthews 

Carolyn Sue Boyd High Point 

H**Elizabeth Perkins Boyer Washington 

William Smithson Bugg, Jr Warrenton 

* Anthony Scott Carpenter Shelby 

Orlando Fern Comer Eagle Springs 

*Donna Rae Cosden Easton, MD 

*Clyde Ronell Dalton Hendersonville 

Donnie Eugene Eplee Rutherfordton 

*David Leitner Ervin Statesville 

*Donna Sapp Fabric Gainesville, FL 

*Michael Scott Fitzner Greensboro 

Frank Powell Fox, Jr Oxford 

Steven Charles Fuchs Stokes 

**Martha Jean Gruelle Wilmington 

*Mary Calvert Hall Reidsville 

Judy Jane Hearn Bethesda, MD 

* Julia Leigh Jordan Winston-Salem 

Lucille Lee Keating Raleigh 

H**Michael David Killian Hendersonville 

Marvin Douglas Lee Kinston 

Mary Gail Levi Asheville 

H*Andrew Venning McMurry Shelby 

James Douglas McRae, Jr Laurinburg 

Ann Yancey Mebane Mebane 

*Beverly Smith Purnell Monroe 

**Margaret Lyne Randell Aberdeen, SD 

Douglas Warren Rushing Wingate 

**Tena Denese Shepherd Greensboro 

*Jill Carol Singer Flushing, NY 

Peter Jon Swenson Kennebunk, ME 

Randall Marvin Wells Dallas 

*Ann Clayton West Ft. Lauderdale, FL 



Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

13 



Individualized Study Program 

*Eugene Paschal Brantly, Jr Raleigh 

H*James Wilton Musselwhite Lumberton 

Medical Technology 

*MaryToni Germani Bachman Syracuse, NY 

Martha Louise Jerome Cooleemee 

*Geraldine Alice Pullease Winston-Salem 

Pest Management for Crop Protection 

James Chester Barbour, III Smithfield 

H*Larry James Wilson Shelby 

Poultry Science 

H*Robin Sidney Adair Beaufort 

James Dennis Brooks Siler City 

H*John Garvin Brown Burlington 

H*Mae Charlene Callis Cofield 

*Larry Allan Cloninger Stanley 

Terry Eugene Combs North Wilkesboro 

John Michael Johnson Charlotte 

Merrill Frederick Kahl Havelock 

H*Jessica Ann Lasley Cary 

H*William Max Little, Jr Jefferson 

H*Donald Ray Mclntyre, Jr Stony Point 

*Lawrence Emery Miller Asheville 

Raymond Harrison Moore, Jr Sharpsburg 

**Rex Alan Pegram Lewisville 

Larry Ray Stanley Durham 

Thomas James Stinnett Wake Forest 

Randy Parks Stroud Statesville 

Mark Wayne Williams Salisbury, MD 

Rural Sociology 

**Sherry Hough Cole Raleigh 

*Denise James Parker Greensboro 

Joseph Lawrence Walden Raleigh 

Soil Science 

H*Celia Lynne Cannon New Bern 

Thomas Herman Howard Lincolnton 

*Michael Kerry Kimbro Greensboro 

H**Timothy Clark Martin Shelby 

**Roger Lane Pearce Rocky Mount 

Wildlife Biology 

Robert Kornegay Abernethy Charlotte 

H**Alice Ward Allen New Bern 

Ethel Ruth Allen Tar Heel 

**Gary Thomas Allred Asheboro 

* Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

14 



H*Roberta Jo Blue High Point 

•Elisabeth Korytynski Gardner Raleigh 

**Robert Berry Green High Point 

Mark Kevin Grigg Gastonia 

*Peter Thomas Hertl Raleigh 

William James Kahler Muncy, PA 

Morris Vann Mitchell Spring Hope 

H**Edgar Barry Moser Greensboro 

* Jennie Kathryn Reaves Charlotte 

H**Richard Raymond Repasky Charlotte 

Johnny Michael Sanders Franklin 

Clarence Edgar Stevens Council 

James Phillip Tillotson, Jr Mount Airy 

James Dale White Salisbury 

Zoology 

*Martha Irene Barnes Birmingham, MI 

**Frederick Coleman Beck Wadesboro 

H**Peter Uwe Bendt Fayetteville 

**Lewis Bryant Bolin, Jr Gastonia 

H*Donna Collier Bowman Kinston 

•Matthew Anthony Bridger Raleigh 

William Thurston Broughton Raleigh 

*Susan Caryl Bullock Durham 

**Thomas Joseph Burns Bordentown, NJ 

James Wesley Cashwell High Point 

**Steven Fredrick Chapman Asheville 

*Gregory Alan Childress Traphill 

*Martha Abernethy Combs Hickory 

**James Ernest Crenshaw, Jr Gastonia 

H**Robin Sheryl Cuthbertson Charlotte 

**Patsy Foster Daniels Lewisville 

Mark Shelton Davis Bryson City 

H**Katherine Ann Donaldson Raleigh 

H*Timothy Lester Donnelly Apex 

H**Hilary Kate Ellwood Raleigh 

Danny Darrell English Pascagoula, MS 

H**Matthew Todd Faraone Burlington 

Susan Leslie Fore Charlotte 

H**Karen Lvnne Freeman Raleigh 

H**William Lewis Fulcher, III Raleigh 

Sherwood Auburn Godwin Pikeville 

Steven Garrett Gregg Wilmington, DE 

*Deborah Gail Grimes Fayetteville 

Frank Marcus Gupton Raleigh 

H**Nelson Ardd Haden Asheboro 

H**Joseph Earl Hightower Jefferson 

*Kimbrough Montgomery Hornsby Garner 

Karen Grey Hudson Reidsville 

**David Sprague Hunt Raleigh 

Jon Mathews Iglehart Severna Park, MD 

**David Edward Johnson Shelby 



Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

15 



H* Peggy Ann Johnston Laurinburg 

H*Philip Brent Jones Mt. Gilead 

H**David Wayne Lee Wilmington 

•Robert Preston Lentz Burlington 

Timothy Wayne Malburg Greensboro 

**Thomas Wade Mangum Charlotte 

Roger Willis Mays Goldsboro 

**Grace Conley McCall Marion 

Cynthia Anne McNeill West Jefferson 

*Lawrence Emery Miller Asheville 

H*Nancy Jane Miller Claremont 

Catherine Jean Moore Canton 

*Susan Louetta Moore Selma 

*Jeffery Keith Morton Spring Lake 

**James Lindsay Mostrom Arlington, VA 

Elizabeth Plyler Myers Rich Square 

H Edith Carol Neal Shelby 

H**James Charles Osborne Greensboro 

H**Stephen Westman Petersen Raleigh 

Ellen Montague Pillow Newport News, VA 

H*Peter Joseph Price Raleigh 

*Daryl Harley Raper Spencer 

H**MaryAnn Rozakis Raleigh 

* Pamela Lou Russell Star 

David Lee Rust, Jr Valdese 

H**Mark Garland Ruttle Joliet, IL 

Richard Gibran Saleeby, Jr Raleigh 

*Timothy Herman Smith Kinston 

*John Mark Spargo Cooleemee 

Judith Simms Speas Winston-Salem 

*Mark Durwood Stephenson Fuquay-Varina 

*David DuBose Stewart Fayetteville 

**Nancy Michelle Story Raleigh 

H*Scott David Studenberg New Brighton, MN 

Cynthia Leigh Thomas Winston-Salem 

**Cynthia Lynn Tice Moyock 

*Stephen Joseph Toth, Jr Greensboro 

Connie Sue Underwood Raleigh 

William Joseph Vanderlip, Jr Charlotte 

Lynette Ring Venable Winston-Salem 

H**Freda Anne Verlinden Raleigh 

H**Helen Florence Wadsworth Ahoskie 

Craig Bernard Walters Louisburg 

H*Constance Jean Waterstradt Charlotte 

*Glen Lee Watkins Raleigh 

Vickie Lynn White High Point 

Chapman Uzzell Joel Williams Snow Hill 

H*David Norman Williams Cary 

"John Howard Williams New Bern 

Steven Adrian Wilson Cary 

Woody Herman Yates Morrisville 



* Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

16 



School of Design 




BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN IN ARCHITECTURE 

•Richard McCarthy Acree, Jr Raleigh 

♦Erik B. Arnesen Baltimore, MD 

♦♦Robert Frederick Barkhau Raleigh 

Michael Ward Behringer Water Mill, NY 

**Charles Hussey Boney, Jr Wilmington 

♦♦William Eugene Bradham Greensboro 

♦♦Clark Culbertson Burritt Greensboro 

♦Richard Gordon Caldwell Raleigh 

♦Susan Elizabeth Cole Goldsboro 

*Ronald Pearce Cox Moncure 

*Jennet Elizabeth Dame Charlotte 

*Pamela Lesher Darney Easton, PA 

♦♦Karen Elizabeth Gay Rocky Mount 

♦Kenneth Allen Griffin Concord 

♦Douglas Allen Hofer Greensboro 

*Percy Rivera Hooper, Jr Winston-Salem 

Philip Gordon Home Charlotte 

Ismat Abdul Fattah Hummadi Baghdad, Iraq 

♦♦Stephen Paul Jackson Charlotte 

**Rayford William Law Raleigh 

*Thomas Vance Lawrence Lexington 

♦Joel Joseph McCreary Charlotte 

*Robert Edward McCulley Greensboro 

Joseph Gilmore McDowell Fayetteville 

*James Daniel McRae Laurinburg 

♦Byung-Moo Oh Seoul, Korea 

*Ernest Albert Reavis, Jr Stanley 

*David Jeffrey Riddle Raleigh 

*Stanley Elisha Rowland Pinetown 

"♦Jeffrey Herbert Schoellkopf Cherry Hill, NJ 

♦Michael Conrad Smith Cary 

♦Donna Jean Ward Efland 

♦♦Douglas Darby Westmoreland Charlotte 

Mark Edward Williard Mocksville 

BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN IN LANDSCAPE 
ARCHITECTURE 

Kenneth Frank Eichner Washington, DC 

♦Elizabeth Jan Seymour Goldsboro 

♦Cynthia Ann Strobel Columbus, MI 

♦♦Linda Jane Winecoff Charlotte 

♦♦Nur Ashiha Binti Yahaya Perak, Malaysia 

* Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

17 



BACHELOR OF ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN IN PRODUCT DESIGN 

*Lesley Louise Boney Charlotte 

*Mary Josephine Coyne Raleigh 

**Joseph Stephen Davis Iron Station 

Charlotte Ann Forrest Tarboro 

Mary Carol Foster Charlotte 

*Mark Andrew Harrison Asheville 

**Renate Schuchardt Hoffman Offenbach (Main), Germany 

*Percy Rivera Hooper, Jr Winston-Salem 

Fiona Jane Inglis Sydney, Australia 

John Eric Kirtz Raleigh 

Elizabeth Pannill Moseley Greenville 

Michael Harvey Mullins Fayetteville 

Danny Lee Pardue Hamptonville 

*Deborah Claire Smith Greensboro 

"Catherine Shaw Williams Raleigh 



School of Education 




BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PSYCHOLOGY 

*Joanne McCracken Albright Raleigh 

Joanna Elizabeth Andrews Raleigh 

*Toni Gournas Bailey Raleigh 

Roger Kent Ballance Elizabeth City 

David Lee Boling Cary 

**Monica Marie Bousman Garner 

*Mark Craig Briley Raleigh 

Thomas Kevin Bryan Lansdale, PA 

**Lisa Helen Coker Raleigh 

Trudy Irene Cooper Raleigh 

*Blanche Elizabeth Creech Dover, DE 

James Timothy Davis Hamlet 

Deborah Faye Dickerson Raleigh 

Margaret Cynthia Elmore Dunn 

Elven Leroy Gilliam Nashville 

**Linda Ann Gonder Raleigh 

*Lynn Elizabeth Harris Clinton 

*Deborah Pearce Hayes Raleigh 

""Theresa Edwards Hayes Raleigh 

**Donna Sheryl Hicks Willow Springs 



* Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

18 



*Cheryl Ann Holder Raleigh 

Nancy Louise Hooker New Bern 

Alan Dale Huneycutt Mountain Home 

**Ella Marie Inman Tabor City 

*Robert Lewis Jordan Winston-Salem 

Marie Ellen Libby Raleigh 

Maureen Suzanne McCusty Charlottesville, VA 

Betty Myrtle Minton Cary 

Patrick Allan Nelson Valley Forge, PA 

Colleen Murray Oeters Raleigh 

Karen Michele Pappas Gastonia 

Virginia Karen Pearson Gibson 

*Robin Leigh Phillips Raleigh 

*Janet Leigh Potts Princeton 

Courtney Bowen Proveaux Raleigh 

*Robin Renee Rhyne Fayetteville 

David Timothy Scoggins Burlington 

*Karen Elizabeth Shoffner Greensboro 

* Judy Ann Sidden Winston-Salem 

Dean Edwin Sprinkle Statesville 

Steven Curtis Taylor Roanoke Rapids 

*Mary Annette Turnage Raleigh 

Mary Kathryn Vogler Winston-Salem 

*Wilbur Lincoln Walker Goldston 

Elaine Welker Willis Greensboro 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

Agricultural Education 

*Mark Bradford Corriher Mooresville 

*James Timothy Etheridge Roanoke Rapids 

*David Leitner Ervin Statesville 

Larry Jerome George Whiteville 

*William Craig Lambert Bear Creek 

William Edward Little, Jr Elm City 

*Gary Thomas Roberson Williamston 

*Grafton Michael Roberts Hamptonville 

William Thomas Ross Oak City 

Ralph Eugene Sadler, Jr Yanceyville 

Ron McCoy Stanley Nakina 

Francis Darrell Taylor, Jr Williamston 

Michael Page Walters Fairmont 

**Dennis Talmadge Worley Cerro Gordo 

Industrial Arts Education 

*Gayenell Campbell Gull Greenville 

*Sallie Ann Hargrave Cary 



Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

19 



*James Edward Herrmann Raleigh 

Eric Richard Lane Taylorsville 

Donald Lee Martin Durham 

Donna Michelle Puryear Cary 

Richard Huff Webb Kenbridge, VA 

*Mark Francis Whelan Camillus, NY 

Mathematics Education 

*Bernard Dean Barnes, Jr Rocky Mount 

Charles Lynn Beavers Siler City 

Lois Elain Bradley Sylva 

**Beverly Ann Brown Winston-Salem 

*Teresa Anne Clarke Conover 

Mark Arlin Fauls Raleigh 

♦♦Wendy Hill Gehrm Knightdale 

♦Roslyn Esther Goetze Raleigh 

♦Deborah Ann Haley Ocala, FL 

"Janice Gaye Hunter Wendell 

♦Joy Denise James Bethel 

Carolyn Elizabeth Johnson Greensboro 

Eric Duran Long Winston-Salem 

♦♦Philip George Nifong Lexington 

*Brenda Jean Petrea Raleigh 

Sherri Lynn Pickard Graham 

*Edith Lynn Sneeden Wilmington 

*Michaelle Angela Stone Lumberton 

Ava Teresa Stout Sanford 

Susan Renee Taylor Selma 

Donald Jeffrey Whitfield Burlington 

Karen Rose Wilson Cary 

Science Education 

Janice Miles Arden Asheville 

*William Allen Hamlin Hendersonville 

♦♦Martha Cecilia Hinton Glen Ellyn, IL 

Eric Lee McKnight China Grove 

♦Joseph Lee Trotter Lewisville 

Pamela Jo Whitaker Burlington 

Merry Kathryn Williams Tomahawk 

Secondary Education 

Susan Williams Dellinger Raleigh 

**Willis Charles May Louisburg 

Vocational Industrial Education 

Thomas Alexander Bridges, Jr Cary 

Wendell Terence Crite Brevard 

♦Richard Aubrey Fry Warsaw 

James Arthur Henderson Apollo, PA 

Annette Louise LaGarde Raleigh 

John Joseph Martin Trucksville, PA 

David Floyd Miller Winston-Salem 

* Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

20 



*Lynn Donald Morris Nazareth, PA 

*Sue Palmer Patterson Canton 

*Frances Annette Pope Kenly 

Horace Alexander Strickland, Jr Greensboro 

John Alexander White, III Smithfield 

'*Patsy Jean White Henderson 



School of Engineering 




BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGICAL AND 
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Jointly administered by the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the School 
of Engineering. 

Anthony Dial Rowland 

*Talbott Locklear Red Springs 

Victor Ferrer Maya Winston-Salem 

Michael Ernest Mazejka Miami, FL 

Donald Wayne Plummer Raeford 

Frank Alexander Rankin, III Concord 

*Sydney Keith Seymour Guyana, South America 

♦♦Hurtford Smith, Jr Oak City 

Willis Perkins Taylor, III Gatesville 

Henry Paul Walker, Jr Durham 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AEROSPACE ENGINEERING 

*Patricia Lea Beckman Huntsville, AL 

Charles Leon Bunting, Jr Asheboro 

Charlie Edward Cutchin Tarboro 

*Reginald Bryn Dailey Albemarle 

Frank Maxton DeArmond Charlotte 

James Andrew Gregory Elizabeth City 

*Rupert Erich Hazle Columbus 

Alfred Madison Priest Vass 

**Ricardo Carballo Rodriguez Durham 

**Clayton James Small Point Harbor 

Warren Ray Spence Fayetteville 

** James Agnew Trotter Rocky Mount 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

*Wyatt Anton Aasen Severna Park, MD 

Mohammed Abubaker Kutigi, Nigeria 

H**Kevin Lee Black Raleigh 

* Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

21 



*Ricky Lynn Bowman Walnut Cove 

Helen Holmes Brown South Hill, VA 

John Thomas Cenicola, Jr Dover, NJ 

*Michael Ray Clowers Raleigh 

Robert Thomas Currin, Jr Wilmington, DE 

*Louis Hamilton Ervin Boomer 

**Herbert Wilson Fincher, Jr Matthews 

Harry Ogburn Fishel Roanoke Rapids 

H**Lyndon Hill Fleming Wilmington 

Adeyinka Gbadebo Abeokuta, Nigeria 

"Caroline Cobey Goodwin Winston-Salem 

Robert Webb Griswold Charlotte 

H**Mark Benjamin Hamner Raleigh 

Flint Harding, III Fayetteville 

•Michael Jerome Hargarten Wilmington, DE 

**Joyce Lynn Heilig Salisbury 

Douglas Charles Hicks Hickory 

*James Allen Hoeger Greensboro 

H**Robert Douglas Hughes, IV Durham 

Kenneth Wayne Ingold Greensboro 

""Howard Beverly Johnson, III Cedar Rapids, IA 

Mohamed Tayebali Kachwalla Raleigh 

Paul Max Love, Jr Charlotte 

H**Michael Wren Lowder Albemarle 

** John Anthony Martinez Jacksonville 

John Henry Mattson Newport 

*Richard Anderson McBrayer Williamston 

Byron Edward Melvin, Jr Elizabethtown 

Allan Mark Minday Charlotte 

Charles William Morehead Shelby 

Michael John Nay Goldsboro 

Henry John Nicholson, III Charlotte 

H**Randy Clair Perry Rocky Mount 

Gregory Lee Peterson Winston-Salem 

♦Gerald Edwin Piatt Rocky Mount 

George Pinkney Robinson, Jr Vale 

*Wayne Allen Shulby Wilmington, DE 

*Steven Patrick Smiley Canton 

**James Samuel Thomasson Hamptonville 

*William Bonner Thompson, Jr Aurora 

*Kirti Wadhwa Raleigh 

*Steven Rohn Wagoner Boonville 

H**Larry McClease Williams Elizabeth City 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Carl Herman Baker, Jr Kinston 

Bynum Bitting Banner, III Gastonia 

*Dean Keith Bingham Shelby 

**Russell Jerome Briggs Bryson City 

Keith Placido Bulla Jacksonville 

Alan Kinney Chesnutt Washington 

**Nancy Gustafson Cline McKeesport, PA 

Paul A. Colbert Raleigh 

George Louis Comer Mt. Airy 

**Mohammad Company Tehran, Iran 

* Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

22 



Robert Glenn Craig, Jr Gastonia 

Donald Andre' Davenport, Jr Plymouth 

Robert Lacy Dick, IV Belmont 

Linda Marie Donnelly Goldsboro 

**Ronald Culley Frazier, Jr Winston-Salem 

**Thomas Lee Frederick, Jr Gastonia 

*Thomas William Glenn Durham 

Edward Allen Green Alexander 

**Joseph Earlton Hardee, Jr Asheboro 

*Beverly Bowen Haynes Garner 

**Tracy Lee Hill Lexington 

Timothy Adrian Hoffman Burlington 

John Lewie Holley, Jr Raleigh 

Dennis Keith Hoyle Shelby 

*Walter Fredrick Hunter Charlotte 

Paul Andrew Ivey Fayetteville 

* Allen Rex Johnson Hope Mills 

Charles Lofton Johnson Warsaw 

Donnell Earle Johnson Raleigh 

John Murray Kartanson Winston-Salem 

Joseph Keith Kilpatrick Murphy 

Ben Dixon Lackey, Jr Wilmington 

John Robert League Rocky Mount 

**Alan Tillery Leary, III Morehead City 

*Susan Brooks Leonard Ellenboro 

John Junior McCown Fayetteville 

**Steven William McDonald Wilson 

Michael Jay Means Myrtle Beach, SC 

Michael Ando Midgette Roanoke Rapids 

Gary Michael Moore Kannapolis 

Richard Hale Nordon Tallassee, AL 

**Ernest Mark Oakley Burlington 

James Lee Pendergrass Raleigh 

**Robert McPherson Pitts, Jr High Point 

**Robert Bruce Prevo Greensboro 

Donald Duane Redmond, Jr Jacksonville 

Randy Joe Rogers Bladenboro 

*James Randy Royal Wade 

*Scot Douglas Simon Monroe 

*Wanda Denise Sims Burlington 

**Betsy Jane Smith Charlotte 

*Richard Mansfield Snow Lumberton 

*Louis La Verne Speas Rural Hall 

H**Mark Anderson Taylor Greensboro 

*Ralph Dailey Taylor, Jr Kinston 

James Keith Terry Meadows of Dan, VA 

Joseph Chapman Tribble Winston-Salem 

Larry Alston Vick Rocky Mount 

Milan Mark Walker McLean, VA 

William Guy Warmack, III Cove City 

Sherwood Lee Webb Asheville 

Edward Glenn Wetherill Wrightsville Beach 

♦Robert Ronald Wiksell Hendersonville, TN 



Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CIVIL ENGINEERING, CONSTRUCTION 
OPTION 

Rudolph Harding Cook, II Elizabethtown 

Woodrow Grady Dobson Fayetteville 

William Benson Dunn, Jr Greensboro 

Grover Locke Edwards, Jr Hickory 

Ronald Andrew Fitzula Raleigh 

**James Edward Forte' North Merrick, NY 

Harry Johnston Grim, Jr Charlotte 

Roland Wayne High Durham 

**Roger Dale Hurst Gastonia 

Paul Edward Hyler, Jr Eden 

Michael Annest Joyner Charlotte 

Denis Lee Lapan Burlington 

William Russell LeFever Hudson 

George Albert Manecio Amsterdam, NY 

Thomas Lewis Price Mooresville 

John Lea Sally, III Raleigh 

**Richard Daniel Sanders Winston-Salem 

*Mark Wallace Smith Clemmons 

H**Julian Raymond Sparrow Cary 

**Randy Glenn Squires King 

Harold Clifford Stevens Cary 

Robert Edmond Strother, Jr Raleigh 

Joseph Edward Thomas Pittsboro 

Johnny Calvin Vestal Clemmons 

Aaron Conley Vick Raleigh 

* John Keith Willis Beaufort 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Robert Alexander Adams Smithfield 

Mohamed AH Alghuneimi Khoms, Libya 

Thomas Edward Allen Albemarle 

James Bernard Alspaugh, Jr Asheboro 

Charles Warren Barnes Raleigh 

*David Rolland Barnes Fayetteville 

Steven Darrell Benfield Lexington 

Michael William Bezera Greensboro 

*Paul Bowden Greensboro 

**Thomas Rodney Bowen Dudley 

Thaddeus Ray Bowling, Jr Durham 

H**John Wesley Boyles Charlotte 

Thomas Edward Brashear Chapel Hill 

♦William Micol Brittain Valdese 

David Kent Brooks Pensacola, FL 

Larry Blake Bumgarner Millers Creek 

H**Michael Blaine Cashwell Longwood, FL 

*Mark Lawrence Cates Hickory 

William Hubbard Clark, Jr Wilmington, DE 

Gary Giles Conrad Elkin 

*James Randall Cook Winston-Salem 

"John Samuel Cooper, Jr Richmond, VA 



* Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

24 



Stewart Alan Cox Flossmoor, IL 

Alan Leonard Crowle Charlotte 

John Wesley Dees, IV Fayetteville 

**Kurt Frederick Deitrick Winston-Salem 

Richard Joseph Devoy Waynesboro, VA 

*Thomas Daniel Eason, Jr Durham 

H**Michael Allen Ernst Concord 

*Robert Lawrence Godbold Cary 

H*Steven Dale Goodman Raleigh 

Rodney Edward Gosnell Aiken, SC 

Douglas William Hayes Islip, NY 

** James Timothy Haynes Waynesville 

Ricky Marshall Holloman Selma 

Marc Warren Howard Raleigh 

**Erwin Cornelius Hudson Elizabeth City 

Theodore Roosevelt Hunt, Jr Forest City 

*Gardner Wayne Ivey Dunn 

H**Michael Craig Jennings Chapel Hill 

*Henry Macintosh John Lumber Bridge 

Markus Wayne Johnson Kernersville 

Donald Paul Kelly Beaufort 

William Ross Kelly Mt. Olive 

Richard Stephen LaBarbera Washington 

*David Dwight Lambeth Trinity 

Linh Hai Luong Winston-Salem 

Stephen Joseph MacDonald, Jr Chambersburg, PA 

Robin Edwin Manning Williamston 

*Roy Stephen Marshall Raleigh 

Scott Tribble Mayo Tarboro 

♦Kindell Marshall McDaniel Enfield 

Ralph Charles Merrill Beaufort 

*Daniel Edward Moore Raleigh 

*Asbury Stephen Mullinix Raleigh 

* John O'Connor Hubert 

*Stephens Samuel Payne Charleston, SC 

Charles Paul Pietsch East Liverpool, OH 

Michael Wayne Pruitt Kitty Hawk 

Victor William Raper Winston-Salem 

*Ronald Franklin Ray Kernersville 

Phillip Matthews Scott, II Eden 

Mark Winston Seagondollar Raleigh 

*Christopher Robert Seekamp Raleigh 

H** James Richard Shealy Hendersonville 

H**Cecil Douglas Smith Greensboro 

H* Arthur Lynn Snuggs Albemarle 

*Hunter Konrad Stakeman Bennettsville, SC 

*David George Stewart Brevard 

•Arthur Vernon Stringer Ellerbe 

*Douglas Gwyn Sutherland Raleigh 

*Charles Edwin Tate Greensboro 

Claude B. Tyson Cary 

John Frederic Vaeth Greensboro 

**David Eugene Van den Bout Pinehurst 

Michael Gregory Warren North Wilksboro 

John Robert Way, Jr Fayetteville 



Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

25 



Philip Ray Williams Linwood 

♦Paul Clifton Winslow Cary 

Bill Eric Youngblood Dunn 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING OPERATIONS 

John Michael Beaver Salisbury 

Randall Jeffrey Bennett Mooresville 

Gary Ellis Collins Clinton 

*Carlton Beverly Cooper, Jr Washington 

William Warren Dotson Charlotte 

**James Sidney Foushee Sanford 

Folan Hinson, Jr Monroe 

George Burwell Holdsworth Raleigh 

Stephen David Howell Winston-Salem 

Walter Fletcher Kelly, Jr Garner 

Eric Lyle Larsen Raleigh 

Howard Michael Lowdermilk Ramseur 

Maurice Samuel Mayes, Jr Washington, DC 

John Charles Mullikin Warner Robins, GA 

Joseph Davis Patterson, Jr Raleigh 

Richard Lyndon Rader Lenoir 

John Douglas Remeta Raleigh 

William Baynard Simons, IV Charlotte 

Douglas Ernest St. Louis Raleigh 

Joel Mark Strickland Erwin 

Stuart Edward White Waynesville 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING SCIENCE AND MECHANICS 

*Dennis Dean Andrews Durham 

Brantley Hollan Durham Shelby 

H*Charles Keith Haisley Asheville 

**Florence Ann Herlevich Wilmington 

Dolan Lafayette Huffman, Jr Hickory 

*Thomas Mitchell Maynard Fayetteville 

Edward Taylor O'Dell, Jr Rome, GA 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FURNITURE MANUFACTURING AND 
MANAGEMENT 

Rickie Glenn Bowman Hickory 

Rickie Eugene Coffey Wilkesboro 

Gregory Steven Crocker Hickory 

David McKenzie Culp Cullowhee 

**George Louis Derbyshire Camden 

Vincent Prescott Epps Statesville 

David Marks Heyman Rome, GA 

**Darrell Marvin Jones Hickory 

Curtis Emra Kelly Winston-Salem 

Marion Lee Spears, Jr Lexington 



* Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

26 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

David James Allen Charlotte 

George Robert Auten, Jr Belmont 

*Richard Wayne Bagley Clayton 

David William Barringer Conover 

**Tony Russell Blalock Timberlake 

*Charles Alan Clayton Southern Pines 

James Clarence Coggin, Jr High Point 

**John Timothy Compton Greensboro 

**George Louis Derbyshire Camden 

Bryan David Hopkins Brown Summit 

*Jeffrey White Johnson Clemmons 

*Randy Day Joyce Stoneville 

♦Walter Ray Mitchell High Point 

Edward Scott Moose Conover 

Neena Lynn Nowell Creedmoor 

Jeffery Scott Parker Kings Mountain 

John Robert Parrish Raleigh 

*Dawn Elizabeth Shropshire Eden 

Ronnie Sherrill Strickland Salemburg 

Steven James Uhl Raleigh 

Blake Lesley White Concord 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MATERIALS ENGINEERING 

* James Jay Hodson Greensboro 

Jacob Thaddeus Hooks Fremont 

Michael Lloyd Meier Goldsboro 

Jerry Keith Moore Charlotte 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Ivan Mauricio Azuero Bogota, Colombia 

Paul Frederick Bailey Greensboro 

Woodrow James Bailey Millers Creek 

*Mary Patricia Bass High Point 

* James Robert Benson, III Wilmington 

Michael Thomas Beroth Pfafftown 

Chester Lee Brafford, Jr Raleigh 

Ronald George Bremer Winston-Salem 

*Carey Andrew Camp Durham 

*Henry Andrew Carlson Shelby 

**Stephen Blakely Cates Charlotte 

*Joe Holland Charles, Jr Lexington 

Charles Edouard Chassaing Raleigh 

Barry Lucas Conrad Winston-Salem 

Michael Lewis Crawford Newport News, VA 

Stanley Albert Crisp Charlotte 

H**Douglas Alan Davey Raleigh 

William Mark Davidson Raleigh 

H**Joseph Randall Davis Raleigh 

Vorapot Dej-Udom Bangkok, Thailand 

*Weldon Ross Dixon Winston-Salem 



Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

27 



•Willard John Feimster, Jr Morganton 

Scott Robin Forrest Mt. Airy 

John Rodney Francis Charlotte 

Hooshang Goodarzi Aligoodarz, Iran 

Charles Michael Gregson Liberty 

H*Richard Wayne Hahn, Jr Charlotte 

George Noal Hale Eden 

*Gregory William Hall Durham 

Lloyd Harmon Hancock Winston-Salem 

Danny Andrew Hardin Morganton 

*Robey Courtney Hartley Lenoir 

*Willem Sijbrand Haven Winston-Salem 

Kim Everette Hinshaw East Bend 

Roger Craig Holland Raleigh 

**Lewis Wayne Holley Raleigh 

David Wayne Holtsclaw Newland 

♦John Carlyle Hopkins Burlington 

♦Robert John Jones Pitman, NJ 

John Anthony Kauffmann, Jr Raleigh 

Benjamin Alton Kirby Morganton 

•William Joseph Kronenwetter Raleigh 

Robert Sherwood Lamb Chapel Hill 

*Donald Ivey Lamonds Greensboro 

Donna Hanner Langdon Durham 

**Douglas Michael Laws Pleasant Garden 

♦William David Learner, Jr Charlotte 

*Allen Douglas Lee Charlotte 

Gerand Craig Lynch Alexandria, VA 

Jay Frederick Maltais Raleigh 

William Gary Matthews Benson 

Albert Sidney Miller Lenoir 

Joseph Benjamin Millikan Sophia 

*Henry Davis Mitchell, III Winston-Salem 

Ralph A. Moody Charlotte 

*Ronald Harrison Morgan Greensboro 

Jon David Motes Gastonia 

John Barry Murphy, Jr Smithfield 

♦♦Gerald James Orazem Gastonia 

♦Vincent Patrick Pearce Charlotte 

Keith Hunter Petree Tobaccoville 

David Randolph Phelps Raleigh 

•Joseph Allen Phillips, Jr Raleigh 

♦Arthur Frederick Reimers, Jr Raleigh 

H**Harry William Reinitz Oxford 

Benjamin Ennis Rollins, Jr Goldsboro 

♦Harold James Royal Mebane 

Henry Bryan Sanders Wilmington 

♦♦Brian Douglas Sartori Jamestown 

*Gregg Stuart Schmidtke Fayetteville 

♦John Parker Shell Raleigh 

♦William Woodrow Simpson, III Durham 

♦♦Jeffrey Michael Stallings Winston-Salem 

Daniel Robert Thurber Wilmington 



♦ Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

28 



Phillip Marion Turnipseed Cary 

H**Donald Goodwin Walker, Jr Wilmington 

♦Bruce Robert Watson Raleigh 

James Allen Williams Ruston, LA 

Coleman Frederick Wilson Waynesville 

♦James Joel Womack Maiden 

"William Cecil Wood Charlotte 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 

♦♦Thomas Christopher Clark Yadkinville 

♦Thomas Bruce Conley Wilson 

♦Royal Thomas Daniel, III Raleigh 

♦♦Edward Miller Faggart Charlotte 

rPMark Stephen Fairchild Vilas 

George Fulton Gilliland Jacksonville, FL 

♦♦Randy Wayne Hobbs Goldsboro 

George Lawrence Hodge Charlotte 

Meldon Aitken Holjes, Jr Greensboro 

James Michael Loerch Burlington, IA 

♦Michael Joseph Lorek Fayetteville 

Clarence Haywood Mabry, Jr Albemarle 

H^Garry Dale Miller Brown Summit 

Keith Hunter Petree Tobaccoville 

H^Richard Theodore Redano Gastonia 

H^Robert Price Taylor, Jr Lynchburg, VA 

James Allen Twiggs Morganton 

H^Gregory Ray Westmoreland Clemmons 



School of Forest Resources 




BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CONSERVATION 

Jointly administered by the School of Forest Resources and the School of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences. 

♦Robert Scot Bowen Buffalo, NY 

Donald Reid Cofer, Jr Matthews 

Mary Christine Garber Albemarle 

Terry Michael Joyner Wilmington 

Robert Harrill Kluttz Charlotte 

♦Robin Dale Lipford Ruffin 

James William Madden Greensboro 

James Dean Meacham Greensboro 

William Eugene Postlethwait Durham 

James Moore Schenck Shelby 

* Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

29 



Mary Elizabeth Selzer Charlotte 

Gregory Fitzgerald Smith Durham 

Barbara Edith Walker Greensboro 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FORESTRY 

H**Gary Thomas Allred Asheboro 

Steven Roy Ansley St. Charles, IL 

Jim Thompson Bowden, Jr Gastonia 

Sheree Yvonne Bowyer Laurinburg 

*James Robert Burgin Cary 

*Dwain Taylor Burke Glen Ellyn, IL 

James Ralph Callis Raleigh 

Howard Edward Campbell, Jr Charlotte 

H**Stanley Warren Carpenter Newland 

Gregory Howard Cheek Clemmons 

Orlando Fern Comer Eagle Springs 

Stephen Halsey Conger, Jr Weldon 

Amelia Susan Conrad Charlotte 

John Philip Cooley Charlotte 

Katherine Libby Corkery Larchmont, NY 

Thomas Malcolm Davidson Bethesda, MD 

H*Paul Alan Everhart Lexington 

Robert Sherman Fearing, II Durham 

Donald Scott Gemmer Raleigh 

H**Robert Berry Green High Point 

♦Robert Boyd Harrison Whiteford, MD 

Randolph Elliott Hughes Yadkinville 

*Michael Kerry Kimbro Greensboro 

Raymond Mason Lilley Tarboro 

Charles Wayne McCoy Charlotte 

Lawrence Dean McCraw, Jr Hendersonville 

Arthur George McDonald Kingston, Jamaica 

*Thomas Hershel McSwain Hendersonville 

David Edward Meiggs Camden 

Roger Van Miller Winchester, TN 

*Douglas Richard Myers Wheaton, MD 

H**Christopher Moore Null Benton, AR 

Wilburn Lonnie Owen Salisbury 

Jeffery Lynn Pardue Jonesville 

Thomas Harry Percival Montague, NJ 

Kenneth Allen Pollock Clinton 

*Keith Dennis Porter Clarendon, Jamaica 

Susan Vanessa Reichert Chapel Hill 

Thornton Watson Rose, Jr Fayetteville 

H* Amy Walden Smith Goldsboro 

Steven Roy Snyder Salisbury 

Herman Marshall Speece, Jr Union Grove 

William Paul Stanton Garner 

John Harrison Talley Hopewell, VA 



* Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

30 



*Fred Mason Thompson Troy 

Michael Thomas Thompson Gaithersburg, MD 

Oren Thomas Waggoner, Jr Charlotte 

Charles Stephen Whaley Elizabeth City 

Timothy John Whelan Cinnaminson, NJ 

*Gregory S. Williams Asheboro 

*Dunbar Laurence Wright Portland, Jamaica 

Jeffrey Lee Yocum Durham 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NATURAL RESOURCE RECREATION 
MANAGEMENT 

*William Wright Burroughs, Jr Oxford 

John Reed Callis Raleigh 

Gregory Howard Cheek Clemmons 

H**Timothy Sherrill Goodfellow Euclid, OH 

*David Edward Malloy Silver Spring, MD 

Thomas Harry Percival Port Jervis, NY 

Terri Lynne Younger Sierra Vista, AZ 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PULP AND PAPER SCIENCE AND 
TECHNOLOGY 

H*Patricia Ann Adams DeRidder, LA 

H*Joel Moye Anderson, III New Bern 

Alan Fisher Armstrong Grifton 

*Blas Phillip Arroyo San Mateo, FL 

H**James Henry Bunch, Jr Williamston 

H*Ronnie Wayne Campbell Milton, FL 

*Terence Dwayne Cutler Arkadelphia, AR 

*Bradford Cameron Garnett Pensacola, FL 

H*Jimmy Carroll Gregg Canton 

Robert Casey Grygotis Lynchburg, VA 

Asa Dalton Hardison Jamesville 

Edward Benton Hickman Charlotte 

Stephen Pierce Hoke Burlington 

Michael John Kerkhof Rome, GA 

*Andrea Jean McAfee Rome, GA 

H*Jeffrey Charles Merck Waycross, GA 

*David Mark Osborne Pensacola, FL 

Thomas Richard Putnam Rutherfordton 

*John Earl Richardson, Jr Southport 

**Robert Thomas Slockett Wilmington 

*Suraphol Udomkesmalee Bangkok, Thailand 

Robert Andrew Vinson Cary 

*William Harrison Watson, Jr Grifton 

*Michele Lee Webb DeRidder, LA 

Bobby Gerald Williams New Bern 

Larry Lynn Williams DeRidder, LA 



* Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

31 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN RECREATION AND PARK ADMINISTRATION 

Richard Michael Ainsworth Charlotte 

Jackie Lee Bass Rocky Mount 

*Angela Sale Brooks North Wilkesboro 

John Reed Callis Raleigh 

Gail Lynne Clendaniel Cambridge, MD 

Alfred Dale Coats Clayton 

Donald Hester Cole Greensboro 

Robert Anthony Corliss Harlingen, TX 

David Kenneth Darden Spring Lake 

Clyde Arthur Denny Burlington 

Cora Louvenia Eure Eure 

George Lance Fulghum Wilson 

Kenneth Dale Goodyear Lumberton 

James William Hamilton Troy 

Cynthia Ann Helton Charlotte 

*Dennis Michael Joines Moravian Falls 

Samuel Moody Kirkland Durham 

Thomas E. Lindner Bethlehem, PA 

Ramona Margot Moore Cary 

Joseph Wayne Phipps Jefferson 

Thomas Melvin Rosser, Jr Broadway 

Robert Grant Stanley State Road 

Susan Avery Sutton Lincolnton 

Carlene Hope Warren Elizabeth City 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN RECREATION 
RESOURCES ADMINISTRATION 

♦Robert Scot Bowen Buffalo, NY 

George Timothy Greene Gastonia 

Gerald Clell Hagler, Jr Concord 

Calvin Warren Hester Roxboro 

Nelson Lynn Lee Tabor City 

*Kathy Bonita Sizemore King 

**Kriste Louise Steinhauer Charlotte 

*John Gus Tsantes Durham 

Sherie Lynne Voland Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN WOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Jeffrey Dale Arnold Raleigh 

William Everett Brothers Raleigh 

**Robert Keith Davis, Jr Swansboro 

Robert Paul Fenstermacher Massapequa, NY 

Charles Freeman Hopkins, Jr Winston-Salem 

Wayne Ammons Howell Pinetown 

Richard Eugene Mellish Williamsport, PA 

Timothy L. Presnell Orange, CT 

Thaddius Riley Roberts, Jr Grantsboro 

Robert Charles Seidler North Hollywood, CA 



* Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 



Dalton Stewart Sexton Thomasville 

Clarence Wayne Willis Raeford 



School of Humanities and 
Social Sciences 




BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ACCOUNTING 

Richard Ervin Barham Raleigh 

Wesley Evans Barnes, Jr Gastonia 

Nancy June Bingaman Gaithersburg, MD 

Kimberly Robin Bland Raleigh 

Thomas Abernethy Brewer Greensboro 

Johnny Ray Brown High Point 

*Brenda Faye Caviness Raleigh 

*Paula Jeanne Comby Conover 

Elizabeth White Davis Raleigh 

Jeffrey Jay Eakes Raleigh 

Jonathan Ray Eakes Raleigh 

Michael Charles Elledge North Wilkesboro 

* Anita Leslie Ennis Conover 

*Steven Lloyd Farber Raleigh 

*Ronald Lynn Flinchum Carthage 

**Joyce Ann Flowers Bentonville 

David Bembry Foxwell Edenton 

Gary Howard Fuquay Carthage 

"Cornelia Strickland Gatz Raleigh 

*Paul Sawyer Herbst Basking Ridge, NJ 

Barbara Ann Hickman Winston-Salem 

Clayton Howard Hobbs Charlotte 

Howard Cline Hollar Conover 

**Patricia Tabor Johnston Hendersonville 

"Troy Wayne Lancaster Raleigh 

Paul Richard Lawler Charlotte 

James Grover Lee, III Greensboro 

Keith Dow Manning Winterville 

Gary Roger Massey Statesville 

Lynn Elizabeth McNair Winston-Salem 

Roger Keith Meneely Huntington, NY 

William Russell Mizelle Raleigh 

David Coles Moore Wilson 

Merri Allen Morgan Wendell 

*Richard Peter Nordan Smithfield 

*Lila Frances Nygaard Warner Robins, GA 



Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 



♦Lewis Payne Orr, Jr Topsail Beach 

Philip Wayne Price Sanford 

Dale Martin Shuford Claremont 

Roy Wayne Stewart Winston-Salem 

Kathy Anne Tatum Mocksville 

Henry Lee White Elizabeth City 

Dale Alan Wilkinson Winston-Salem 

**Marv Bea Wilkinson Newton 

Rex David Williams Raleigh 

Charles Thomas Williford Fuquay-Varina 

Susan Lea Yates Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

Harry Bennett Adams, Jr High Point 

*David Bruce Alexander Raleigh 

Bruce Edward Anderson Rocky Mount 

George Warren Atkinson, Jr High Point 

William Shelton Austin Concord 

Neal B. Balboni Southern Pines 

*Lois Johnson Barbour Clayton 

*Robert Franklin Bardin Raleigh 

**Andrew Jonathan Beall Charlotte 

Wilbur Franklin Beard, Jr Raleigh 

Jack Clifton Bissette, Jr Goldsboro 

Kimberly Robin Bland Raleigh 

Richard Luther Bloom Cary 

Richard Earle Brannon, Jr Pilot Mountain 

James Horace Brantley Bailey 

Thomas Abernethy Brewer Greensboro 

♦Rebecca Elizabeth Britton Charlotte 

Kenneth Miller Bryant, Jr Raleigh 

John Afdem Butler Fayetteville 

Hugh Bernard Carroll, Jr Greensboro 

*Brenda Faye Caviness Raleigh 

*Caren Lou Clark Charlotte 

Elizabeth Leigh Clark Charlotte 

Robert Edward Cleveland Winston-Salem 

Fred Marvin Coltrane, Jr Greensboro 

*Paula Jeanne Comby Conover 

Robert Alvis Cook Winston-Salem 

Carol Lynn Craig Charlotte 

Thomas Jerome Creech Tarboro 

*Terri Royce Cromer Winston-Salem 

Steven Brooks Curtis Burlington 

Claude Thomas Davis, Jr Charlotte 

Elizabeth White Davis Raleigh 

William Danny Dean Kenly 

*Mark Raymond Diering Raleigh 



* Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

34 



Vaughn Mellard DuBose Gastonia 

Jeffery Lynn Easter Charlottesville, VA 

Thomas Mallrey Eldridge Elkin 

Elizabeth Ann Elesha Winston-Salem 

James Warren Ellis Marion 

♦Anita Leslie Ennis Conover 

Clifford Neal Ferrell Raleigh 

Ellen Sue Feuer Durham 

Clay Wade Fink Tyrone, PA 

Scott Johnson Fonville Durham 

Richard Edgar Ford Asheville 

Isaac Gambill Forester North Wilkesboro 

David Bembry Foxwell Edenton 

Richard Glen Frankoff Wilmington 

Ricky Ogilvie Freeman Hendersonville 

Anne Christian Gaillard Fayetteville 

Thurman Clark Gibson High Point 

James Andrew Gordon Winston-Salem 

Sharon Fawzi Habib Alexandria, VA 

♦♦Sandra Stuart Haskins Raleigh 

Richard Talmadge Helms, Jr Kinston 

♦Paul Sawyer Herbst Basking Ridge, NJ 

John Richard High Wilson 

Lalla Jeanne Hodges Washington 

Sarah Alston Homes Washington 

Gerald Chappell Hood Waxhaw 

Michael David House Raleigh 

Richard Keith Huckaby Pilot Mountain 

Steven Douglas Hyde Black Mountain 

Vereene Cynthia Ann Ibiezugbe Durham 

♦♦Mary Kathryn Ireland Raleigh 

James Tillery Johnson, Jr Ahoskie 

*John Mack Johnson Staunton, VA 

Keith Barry Johnson Raleigh 

Phillip Glen Johnson Dunn 

Douglas Glyn Jones Raleigh 

Jeffery Russell Jones Raleigh 

**Kimberly Grace Jordan Whiteville 

♦Sherry Denise Lail Newton 

*Troy Wayne Lancaster Raleigh 

Nancy Jones Leary Louisburg 

Robert Austin Lee Philadelphia, PA 

Sharon Miriam Leinwand Elizabethtown 

Bruce Allen Lowe Westf ield 

James Thomas Manning, III Greenville 

Joseph Paul Marley Charlotte 

Cavaretta Martin Rocky Mount 

Gary Roger Massey Statesville 

♦Rodney Shore Matthews Fayetteville 

James Rudolph McDaniel, Jr Murphy 

John Walton McKenzie High Point 

Richard Cameron McLean Rocky Mount 



Honors ♦* High Honors H Honors Program 

35 



Roger Keith Meneely Huntington, NY 

William Russell Mizelle Raleigh 

David Farrell Moody Asheboro 

David Coles Moore Wilson 

Rick Wilson Murphy Youngsville 

*David Wayne Nichols Raleigh 

Susan Patricia Norton Fairfax, VA 

♦Lila Frances Nygaard Warner Robins, GA 

♦Brantley Swann Orrell Wilmington 

Michael Oakey Page Raleigh 

Lacey Eliza Parrish Smithfield 

Peter Alan Parseghian Henderson 

♦Robert Ivey Peele Goldsboro 

♦Charles Jeffrey Peller Winston-Salem 

David Christian Phelps Windsor 

Ross Gregory Phipps New Bern 

♦Woodrow Player, Jr Charlotte 

Thomas Louis Prongay Colonia, NJ 

♦Terry Lee Reese Nazareth, PA 

William Edward Rhyne, Jr Gastonia 

♦William Howard Riddle, Jr Charlotte 

Detra Leigh Roberson Louisburg 

♦Eric Michael Roberts High Point 

♦James Oren Roberts Mars Hill 

♦Mark Alvin Roberts Charlotte 

Frederick Rollinson, III Greensboro 

Colton Earl Ruffin Wilson 

Edward Lawrence Sanders, III LaPlata, MD 

James Edward Sattler Easthampton, MA 

♦Michael Saunders Senter Lillington 

Kathleen Cameron Sharpe Raleigh 

Bruce Craven Sikes Polkton 

Norwood Lee Simmons Faison 

♦♦Victoria Johnson Simmons Raleigh 

Robert Glen Smith Red House, VA 

♦Carol Staley Stamper Richfield 

Peter Blackwood Stewart Fayetteville 

Roy Wayne Stewart Winston-Salem 

Gary Paul Stokan Pittsburgh, PA 

Stephen Michael Sumner Randleman 

Bruce Ray Sykes Fayetteville 

Carolyn Carson Taylor Raleigh 

Stamey Reynolds Taylor Lillington 

♦Michael Patrick Thompson Charlotte 

George Merrick Tisdale, Jr Asheville 

William Finch Troxler, Jr Raleigh 

♦Suraphol Udomkesmalee Bangkok, Thailand 

Norman Earl Ward, III Annandale, VA 

Angela Faith Watkins Henderson 



* Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

36 



Gregory Moore Weatherford Battleboro 

Dennis Ray Weatherman Winston-Salem 

*Glenn Michael Weaver Cary 

*William Gray West Winston-Salem 

Janet Koobs Wheeler Raleigh 

Henry Lee White Elizabeth City 

Paula Lynne Whitfield Creedmoor 

Rex David Williams Raleigh 

**Sarah Catherine Williamson Raleigh 

Dyan Elois Willoughby Baltimore, MD 

*Joy Dianne Wilson Reidsville 

Herman Stanford Winberry Lumberton 

John Frost Woodhouse, III Asheville 

Alan Shelley Wright Tabor City 

*Mark Blaine Youngquist Garner 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ECONOMICS 

*David Bruce Alexander Raleigh 

Barthelomew Otis Banner Winston-Salem 

*Robert Franklin Bardin Raleigh 

Richard Earle Brannon, Jr Pilot Mountain 

Kenneth Miller Bryant, Jr Raleigh 

Hugh Bernard Carroll, Jr Greensboro 

*Edward Mandre Cherry Windsor 

*Caren Lou Clark Charlotte 

Elizabeth Leigh Clark Charlotte 

Robert Edward Cleveland Winston-Salem 

Fred Marvin Coltrane Greensboro 

Elizabeth White Davis Raleigh 

**Kenneth Allen DeLay Raleigh 

*Mark Raymond Diering Raleigh 

James Warren Ellis Marion 

Scott Johnson Fonville Durham 

Ricky Ogilvie Freeman Hendersonville 

Anne Christian Gaillard Fayetteville 

Bruce Alexander Gayle High Point 

Sharon Fawzi Habib Alexandria, VA 

John Richard High Wilson 

Michael David House Raleigh 

*Mary Tom Houston Burlington 

Steven Douglas Hyde Black Mountain 

Vereene Cynthia Ann Ibiezugbe Durham 

**Mary Kathryn Ireland Raleigh 

James Tillery Johnson, Jr Ahoskie 

Douglas Glyn Jones Raleigh 

Jeffery Russell Jones Raleigh 

**Kimberly Grace Jordan Whiteville 

Robert Austin Lee Philadelphia, PA 

Sharon Miriam Leinwand Elizabethtown 



Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

37 



Harry Bertling Mincey Shelby 

*Charles Jeffrey Peller Winston-Salem 

Philip Wayne Price Sanford 

William Taft Proctor Sanford 

*Terry Lee Reese Nazareth, PA 

•William Howard Riddle Charlotte 

Gary Harold Robbins Cary 

Detra Leigh Roberson Louisburg 

*Mark Alvin Roberts Charlotte 

Frederick Rollinson, III Greensboro 

Edward Lawrence Sanders, III LaPlata, MD 

James Edward Sattler Easthampton, MA 

Kathleen Cameron Sharpe Raleigh 

•William Harrison Stewart, Jr Greensboro 

Larry Michael Tardell Winston-Salem 

Angela Faith Watkins Henderson 

Paula Lynne Whitfield Creedmoor 

Dyan Elois Willoughby Baltimore, MD 

•Joy Dianne Wilson Reidsville 

*Mark Blaine Youngquist Garner 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ECONOMICS 

Kevin Preston Cook Emerald Isle 

•William Sharpe Jones, Jr Oxford 

Kevin Brian Loftin Belmont 

Bobby Lee Pellegrini Pfaff town 

*Joseph Luther Raudabaugh Arlington, VA 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 

Margaret Potter Abbott Raleigh 

Dale Frances Ashley Roxboro 

Katherine Elaine Ayers Elizabethtown 

H**Mary Thane Barnes Rocky Mount 

••Felicity Adams Black Birstall, Leicester, England 

Carol Ann Brannock Mount Airy 

Linda Fay Brewer Winston-Salem 

John Albert Campbell, Jr Charlotte 

James Gilbert Carroll Raleigh 

•Wendy Sue Cotton Fuquay-Varina 

John Nicholas Downey Raleigh 

*Christa Elisabeth Elbert Raleigh 

John Alex Foriest Pendleton 

Walter Eriksen Gray Lumberton 

*Donna Jo Gunter Durham 

Thomas Matthew Harvey Rich Square 

Donald O'Neal Jones Raleigh 

*Drew Krishen Kapur Lawrenceville, NJ 

H**Susan Alice Lefevers Matthews 

•Deborah McKindra Lucas Clarksville, TN 

•Jill Elizabeth Mahler Raleigh 

Dana Wall Melvin Greensboro 



* Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

38 



Linda Claryl Mercer Greensboro 

Carla Anderson Morris Raleigh 

*Katherine Stevens Parker Cary 

*Connie Suzanne Price Elm City 

*G. Stephen Prince Bryson City 

*Taryn Diane Rice Lumberton 

Mark Laverne Robertson Greensboro 

Teresa Lee Saylor Wilson 

Barbara Rene Simmons Raleigh 

Sylvia Reinhardt Stone Yadkinville 

**Connie Wells Mt. Olive 

*Karen Elaine Whitfield Roxboro 

*John Harold Williams Garner 

John Thomas Williams, Jr Cary 

**Samuel Thomas Zahran Fayetteville 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGLISH 

*Dorothy Eugenia Owen Alexandria, VA 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

*Kent Edmond Essick Lexington 

**Barbara Emily Jessome-Nance Edmundston, Canada 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN HISTORY 

Ervin Rankin Brown, Jr High Point 

James Roy Clarke Raleigh 

Paula Jean Collins Greensboro 

Candace Amelia Cranford Newman, GA 

*Alan Craig Downs Raleigh 

*Charles Moore Draughn, III Raleigh 

*Christa Elisabeth Elbert Raleigh 

Druscilla Ramey Franks Raleigh 

*Lois Allene Hall Raleigh 

James Edward Hardin Havelock 

James Russell Howard Virginia Beach, VA 

Timothy Sharp Hull Short Hills, NJ 

*Sarah Crettier Hunnings Raleigh 

**Barbara Emily Jessome-Nance Edmundston, Canada 

Martin Raymond Kahl Havelock 

Rodney Wynn Kight Barco 

Kimly Janell Martin Zebulon 

*Henry Spears Mullen, Jr Kings Mountain 

William Roland Murray, Jr Raleigh 

Gayle Grantham Peacock Cary 

Linda Sue Pollock Clinton 

"Joseph Hiram Prater, III Greensboro 

*Richard Drew Schwartz Maplewood, NJ 

*Debbie Leigh Sheppard Lexington 

Catharine St. George Snell Fayetteville 

**James Otis Sorrell Cary 



Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 



••Anna Teresa Stevenson Winston-Salem 

William Glenn Watkins Raleigh 

Ronald Lee Watts Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MULTI-DISCIPLINARY STUDIES 

Janell Daubin Ellis Shelby 

Linda Carol McDaniels Clarendon 

Susan Morgan Royster Raleigh 

Priscilla Perry Sprunt Springfield, MS 

Mary Kathryn Vogler Winston-Salem 

James Michael White Bladenboro 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PHILOSOPHY 

•Connie Suzanne Price Elm City 

*Hassell Lee Vester Rocky Mount 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Kerry Lynn Ahrend Singers Glen, VA 

Sandra Lynn Alldred Winston-Salem 

Reynold Sawyer Allen Kinston 

•Charles Noel Anderson, Jr Raleigh 

Genia Anderson Charlotte 

•Michael Gordon Beatty Shelby 

**William Lincoln Bradham Chinquapin 

James Michael Chalk Raleigh 

Ronald Bryan Collins Raleigh 

Linda Gail Davis Wilson 

Elizabeth Dale Dollar Durham 

Kathleen Anne Doorley Durham 

Yolanda Maudean Ezekiel Darlington, SC 

Nancy Ellen Farrar Lillington 

Gregory Glenn Goss Ahoskie 

Richard Noel Gusler Burlington 

William Roger Gwinn Charlotte 

Thomas Lowe Harmon Raleigh 

John Mack Harris Candor 

•Douglas Reed Hendry Raleigh 

Daniel Keith Jones Burlington 

•Donna Jo Jones Hendersonville 

David Gene Koonce Jacksonville 

Robert Neal Mann Burlington 

Ricardo Martinez Hope Mills 

Albert Joseph Pleasants Oxford 

Charles Bernard Pugh, Jr Windsor 

Helen Elizabeth Quinn Marion 

Robert Blackwell Rader Morganton 

Frederick Michael Sessoms Greensboro 

••Douglas Tod Shore Pittsburgh, PA 

•Randy Keith Smith Greensboro 

Larry Stokes Gary, IN 

James Lamarr Stowe Belmont 

Anderson Thompson Trinity 

•Michael Adrian Weaver Durham 

* Honors •• High Honors H Honors Program 

40 



Octavis White Mebane 

Jacqueline Anne Womble Greensboro 

Margaret Elizabeth Yates Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SOCIOLOGY 

Beverly Tucker Benfield Lexington 

*Janet Lea Boyd Reidsville 

Nancy Jean Campbell Greenville, SC 

Debra Ann Clark Raleigh 

William Francis Danaher Statesville 

*Mary Rebecca Davis Rutherfordton 

Michael Lynn Davis Leasburg 

Lee Alan Dworsky Raleigh 

Michael John Gimbar Easton, PA 

*Karen Denise Hawkins Mebane 

Willie Harold House Hamlet 

*Sandra Hart Hughes Oxford 

**Patricia Ellen Kearns Nashville 

Marc Richard Kielty Winston-Salem 

Mary Kathryn Knuckley Wendell 

Richard Craig LePors Fayetteville 

Earl Spencer London Raleigh 

H**Maureen Elizabeth Matt Raleigh 

*Diana Thomas McAdams Charlotte 

Stuart Andrew Phillips Charlotte 

Noel Heddy Russos Raleigh 

Ericka Sue Sandbank Kinston 

Jill Siceloff Lexington 

*Shelia Simpson Singleton Greensboro 

*Linda Carol Steelman Greensboro 

**Martha Emily Stikeleather Stony Point 

Mary Gail Swann Garner 

* Andrea McAdory Swanner Graham 

""Caroline Herring Watson LaGrange 

Robert Philip Weir Winston-Salem 

*Cindy Lynne White Aulander 

Brenda Kay Young Bunn 

*Linda Faye Young Bunn 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SPANISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

*Nita Carriella Matthews Wagram 

Marilyn Anne Miller Shore Tobaccoville 

BACHELOR OF SOCIAL WORK 

Kim Marie Bauer Raleigh 

*Mary Edna Cagle Wadesboro 

Mary Ann Clodfelter High Point 



* Honors ** High Honors H Honors Program 

41 



**Linda Kay Eldridge State Road 

Sylvia Gail Ellington Graham 

**Patricia Ruth Gwaltney Jacksonville 

Donnie Evolyn Hayes Ivanhoe 

Deborah Anne Hazelwood Richmond, VA 

Melissa Eve Storie Raleigh 

Charlene Kay Thomas Raleigh 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SPEECH COMMUNICATION 

*Dean Gray Blevins Statesville 

Linda Fay Brewer Winston-Salem 

*John Henry Clarke, Jr Four Oaks 

•William Robert Cordle Cary 

Lisa Paige Creech Smithf ield 

Craig Michael Davis Rockville, MD 

*Susan Paige Denny Alexandria, VA 

Michele Marie Dunn Vero Beach, FL 

Robert Thomas Fuhrman New Cumberland, PA 

Cheryl Lynn Haithcock Greensboro 

H**Susan Alice Lefevers Matthews 

Bruce Allen Lowe Westfield 

Herbert Galen Meekins, Jr Raleigh 

Donald Craig Moore Greensboro 

John Lewis Moore Southern Pines 

Danny Lee Musten Kernersville 

Brenda Collier Ott Raleigh 

Carol Jeanne Powell Raleigh 

Phillip Martin Pugh Raleigh 

Charles Edward Ritter Wake Forest 

Karen Cheek Robbins Greensboro 

Teresa Lee Saylor Wilson 

Finette Sylvia Smith Havelock 

Linda Faye Smith Fayetteville 

James Lamarr Stowe Belmont 

Mark Foster Vaughn Raleigh 

**Bruce Arthur Wittman Raleigh 



School of Physical and 
Mathematical Sciences 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 

*Judith Ann Baumhover 




Oxford 



* Honors 
42 



High Honors 



H Honors Program 



H*Rodney Wayne Beaver Shelby 

H**Alan Charles Belch Charlotte 

H**Clifford Million Carlin Asheville 

*Thomas Stephen Everett Lutherville, MD 

Carlos Warren Hardin Raleigh 

John Alvah Harris Roxboro 

**William James Harris Fayetteville 

H**Kenneth Allen Harrison Swansboro 

Grant Bumgarner Kenion Charlotte 

♦Frank Ree Litaker Concord 

Louis John Micks, Jr Raleigh 

H*David Edwin Morris Charlotte 

•Gregory Lee Park High Point 

*Paul Daniel Ryskiewich Burlington 

♦♦Paul William Saxe Raleigh 

*Resat Say Concord 

Susan Rebecca Setzer Forest City 

Sarah Diane Sharpe Charlotte 

H**Susan Ann Sherrow Charlotte 

Marion Richard Stone, Jr Union Mills 

*Rebecca Ann Wagner Wilmi